LINQ and Entity Framework - Worth a stab?

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Cirene, Sep 7, 2008.

  1. Cirene

    Cirene Guest

    I'm about to begin a brand new, big, ASP.NET project (using 3.5 .net fw), VS
    2008. I'm using MySQL as the backend (customer request.) I have absolutely
    no experience with LINQ and/or the Entity Framework. Though I am quite
    comfortable with ADO.NET and VB.NET.

    In your opinion, should I take a few days and learn it and utilize these
    technologies in this new project (I'm starting from scratch)? Are the
    benefits worth it in your opinion? Is there a steep learning curve in your
    opinion? Or should I stick with what I know for this project?

    I value Your opinion, so please let me know...
     
    Cirene, Sep 7, 2008
    #1
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  2. Cirene

    Cirene Guest

    "Mark Rae [MVP]" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Cirene" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >> In your opinion, should I take a few days and learn it and utilize these
    >> technologies in this new project (I'm starting from scratch)? Are the
    >> benefits worth it in your opinion? Is there a steep learning curve in
    >> your opinion? Or should I stick with what I know for this project?

    >
    > IMO, one of the worst things that a developer can do is to take a new
    > piece of technology and then go looking for a problem for it to solve...
    >
    > I would suggest that you take a few days and learn LINQ, but utilise it
    > ONLY IF IT IS APPROPRIATE for the project. It might be, it might not be...
    >


    Thanks for your input. I was thinking that "biting the bullet" and learning
    it will (1) keep me on the cutting edge technically and (2) take advantage
    of the new benefits. Thanks again...
     
    Cirene, Sep 7, 2008
    #2
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  3. Cirene

    Andy B Guest

    What kind of projects is linq good for then? and What kind of projects is it
    not good for... can you give some examples of each?


    "Mark Rae [MVP]" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Cirene" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >
    >>> I would suggest that you take a few days and learn LINQ, but utilise it
    >>> ONLY IF IT IS APPROPRIATE for the project. It might be, it might not
    >>> be...

    >>
    >> Thanks for your input. I was thinking that "biting the bullet" and
    >> learning it will (1) keep me on the cutting edge technically and (2) take
    >> advantage of the new benefits. Thanks again...

    >
    > Learning LINQ (just like learning any new technology) will indeed keep you
    > up to date, but it's really important not to let technology drive the
    > solution... Just because a piece of technology is new and exciting doesn't
    > mean that it's always the appropriate thing to use in every situation...
    >
    >
    > --
    > Mark Rae
    > ASP.NET MVP
    > http://www.markrae.net
     
    Andy B, Sep 8, 2008
    #3
  4. Cirene

    Andy B Guest

    "Mark Rae [MVP]" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Andy B" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >
    > [please don't top-post]
    >
    >>>> Thanks for your input. I was thinking that "biting the bullet" and
    >>>> learning it will (1) keep me on the cutting edge technically and (2)
    >>>> take advantage of the new benefits. Thanks again...
    >>>
    >>> Learning LINQ (just like learning any new technology) will indeed keep
    >>> you up to date, but it's really important not to let technology drive
    >>> the solution... Just because a piece of technology is new and exciting
    >>> doesn't mean that it's always the appropriate thing to use in every
    >>> situation...

    >>
    >> What kind of projects is LINQ good for then? and What kind of projects is
    >> it not good for... can you give some examples of each?

    >
    > LINQ is a set of extensions to the .NET Framework which encompass
    > language-integrated query, set, and transform operations. It extends .NET
    > languages with native language syntax for queries and provides class
    > libraries to take advantage of these capabilities.
    >
    > Put simplistically, LINQ allows .NET collection objects to be queried with
    > syntax which resembles T-SQL. If your project has a requirement to query
    > collection objects, and you would like to do that with syntax which
    > resembles T-SQL, the LINQ will be be perfect for your project. If your
    > project has no need to do this, then LINQ will be of no use to you.
    >
    > Take AJAX as an example. AJAX is great for allowing parts of web pages to
    > be updated from the server without needing to refresh the entire page -
    > callbacks instead of postbacks. However, if you have no need to refresh
    > parts of web pages without needing to refresh the entire page, and you're
    > perfectly happy with good ol' postbacks, then AJAX is of no use to you. So
    > don't use it - you don't have to if you don't want to or need to...
    >
    > Similarly, the ASP.NET ValidationControls. What are they good for? They
    > are good for projects which need validation. Projects which don't need
    > validation have no use for the ValidationControls. Alternatively, some
    > developers (like me) have evaluated the ValidationControls and find them
    > to be too restrictive so we don't use them.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Mark Rae
    > ASP.NET MVP
    > http://www.markrae.net


    Ok, I use sql server databases all the time. It's is the entire backbone of
    the web applications I am working on now. What would you feel about using
    linq to sql in this case?
     
    Andy B, Sep 8, 2008
    #4
  5. Cirene

    bruce barker Guest

    it depends on requirements. linq has two modes:

    one where its a query of collections (its as efficient as any code you
    write). you should learn linq to replace your for loops as the code will
    run faster (especially if you use foreach).

    the other is where it generates an expression tree (at compile time),
    that is converted to code at runtime. this is how linq to sql works. the
    expression tree is converted to dynamic sql and executed. its great for
    data binding but less useful if you use stored procedures for all you
    sql access.

    the entity framework can be used with or without linq. if you business
    objects are really just based on tables and not a logical view, then
    entity framework is great. it will build a class for each table and
    supports relationships to other tables. its considerable better than
    typed datasets.

    -- bruce (sqlwork.com)


    Andy B wrote:
    > "Mark Rae [MVP]" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> "Andy B" <> wrote in message
    >> news:%...
    >>
    >> [please don't top-post]
    >>
    >>>>> Thanks for your input. I was thinking that "biting the bullet" and
    >>>>> learning it will (1) keep me on the cutting edge technically and (2)
    >>>>> take advantage of the new benefits. Thanks again...
    >>>> Learning LINQ (just like learning any new technology) will indeed keep
    >>>> you up to date, but it's really important not to let technology drive
    >>>> the solution... Just because a piece of technology is new and exciting
    >>>> doesn't mean that it's always the appropriate thing to use in every
    >>>> situation...
    >>> What kind of projects is LINQ good for then? and What kind of projects is
    >>> it not good for... can you give some examples of each?

    >> LINQ is a set of extensions to the .NET Framework which encompass
    >> language-integrated query, set, and transform operations. It extends .NET
    >> languages with native language syntax for queries and provides class
    >> libraries to take advantage of these capabilities.
    >>
    >> Put simplistically, LINQ allows .NET collection objects to be queried with
    >> syntax which resembles T-SQL. If your project has a requirement to query
    >> collection objects, and you would like to do that with syntax which
    >> resembles T-SQL, the LINQ will be be perfect for your project. If your
    >> project has no need to do this, then LINQ will be of no use to you.
    >>
    >> Take AJAX as an example. AJAX is great for allowing parts of web pages to
    >> be updated from the server without needing to refresh the entire page -
    >> callbacks instead of postbacks. However, if you have no need to refresh
    >> parts of web pages without needing to refresh the entire page, and you're
    >> perfectly happy with good ol' postbacks, then AJAX is of no use to you. So
    >> don't use it - you don't have to if you don't want to or need to...
    >>
    >> Similarly, the ASP.NET ValidationControls. What are they good for? They
    >> are good for projects which need validation. Projects which don't need
    >> validation have no use for the ValidationControls. Alternatively, some
    >> developers (like me) have evaluated the ValidationControls and find them
    >> to be too restrictive so we don't use them.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Mark Rae
    >> ASP.NET MVP
    >> http://www.markrae.net

    >
    > Ok, I use sql server databases all the time. It's is the entire backbone of
    > the web applications I am working on now. What would you feel about using
    > linq to sql in this case?
    >
    >
    >
     
    bruce barker, Sep 8, 2008
    #5
  6. ANy time you throw a non-Microsoft technology into the mix, you increase
    your programming time. As such, it is better to stick with technologies that
    have been out awhile, where you can find pages to help you through the
    configuration and coding.

    I also agree with Mark that running around with a hammer, looking for nails,
    is not a good way to solve a problem.

    --
    Gregory A. Beamer
    MVP, MCP: +I, SE, SD, DBA

    Subscribe to my blog
    http://feeds.feedburner.com/GregoryBeamer#

    or just read it:
    http://feeds.feedburner.com/GregoryBeamer

    ********************************************
    | Think outside the box! |
    ********************************************
    "Cirene" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm about to begin a brand new, big, ASP.NET project (using 3.5 .net fw),
    > VS 2008. I'm using MySQL as the backend (customer request.) I have
    > absolutely no experience with LINQ and/or the Entity Framework. Though I
    > am quite comfortable with ADO.NET and VB.NET.
    >
    > In your opinion, should I take a few days and learn it and utilize these
    > technologies in this new project (I'm starting from scratch)? Are the
    > benefits worth it in your opinion? Is there a steep learning curve in
    > your opinion? Or should I stick with what I know for this project?
    >
    > I value Your opinion, so please let me know...
    >
     
    Cowboy \(Gregory A. Beamer\), Sep 8, 2008
    #6
  7. ANy time you throw a non-Microsoft technology into the mix, you increase
    your programming time. As such, it is better to stick with technologies that
    have been out awhile, where you can find pages to help you through the
    configuration and coding.

    I also agree with Mark that running around with a hammer, looking for nails,
    is not a good way to solve a problem.

    --
    Gregory A. Beamer
    MVP, MCP: +I, SE, SD, DBA

    Subscribe to my blog
    http://feeds.feedburner.com/GregoryBeamer#

    or just read it:
    http://feeds.feedburner.com/GregoryBeamer

    ********************************************
    | Think outside the box! |
    ********************************************
    "Cirene" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm about to begin a brand new, big, ASP.NET project (using 3.5 .net fw),
    > VS 2008. I'm using MySQL as the backend (customer request.) I have
    > absolutely no experience with LINQ and/or the Entity Framework. Though I
    > am quite comfortable with ADO.NET and VB.NET.
    >
    > In your opinion, should I take a few days and learn it and utilize these
    > technologies in this new project (I'm starting from scratch)? Are the
    > benefits worth it in your opinion? Is there a steep learning curve in
    > your opinion? Or should I stick with what I know for this project?
    >
    > I value Your opinion, so please let me know...
    >
     
    Cowboy \(Gregory A. Beamer\), Sep 8, 2008
    #7
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