MSDOS-Based Compilable Code for RSA / Other Public-Key Scheme

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Crypto Loko, Oct 2, 2005.

  1. Crypto Loko

    Crypto Loko Guest

    Hello everyone,

    I was wondering if anyone should have any
    TC++ v3.0 / BC++ v3.1, or DJGPP v2.03 code
    for RSA implementation (or similar
    public-key scheme(s)) - of either a module,
    a library, or even a small program?

    I have tried an old version of RSAREF
    (I believe it was v1.0) with TC++ v3.0,
    but it wouldn't compile.

    I have tried Crypto++ Library v5.2.1, but
    that one wouldn't compile either.

    Maybe I'm doing something wrong? I'm not
    very familiar with compiler flags or
    other settings, of either Borland or DJGPP.

    Regardless, my goal is to be able to write an
    MSDOS-based utility that would offer
    the following functions:

    1.) Generate a large secret/public key pair;

    2.) Encrypt / decrypt a file, using a secret/public key;

    3.) Sign / verify a file, using a secret/public key.

    Anything useful would be greatly appreciated,
    Thanks in advance,
    Luke
     
    Crypto Loko, Oct 2, 2005
    #1
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  2. "Crypto Loko" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I was wondering if anyone should have any
    > TC++ v3.0 / BC++ v3.1, or DJGPP v2.03 code
    > for RSA implementation (or similar
    > public-key scheme(s)) - of either a module,
    > a library, or even a small program?


    Well, this group is about the things prescribed by the C standard and for
    some reason the C language standard doesn't contain a single word about the
    aforementioned compilers nor the software you're talking about. If you
    posted a C problem (e.g. a bit of C code with your questions about its
    correctness or behavior), it would be OK. But what you're coming with is
    better be sought elsewhere, say on google.

    > I have tried an old version of RSAREF
    > (I believe it was v1.0) with TC++ v3.0,
    > but it wouldn't compile.


    Which means that either that particular code isn't portable enough or the
    compiler isn't good enough. But we don't know since you haven't shown a bit
    of the code, a real problem that is *in* the scope of the standard C, with
    which you'd probably be pleased to help you out.

    Alex
     
    Alexei A. Frounze, Oct 2, 2005
    #2
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  3. "Alexei A. Frounze" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    ....
    > Which means that either that particular code isn't portable enough or the
    > compiler isn't good enough. But we don't know since you haven't shown a

    bit
    > of the code, a real problem that is *in* the scope of the standard C, with
    > which


    *we'd*

    > probably be pleased to help you out.


    Alex
     
    Alexei A. Frounze, Oct 2, 2005
    #3
  4. Crypto Loko

    Crypto Loko Guest

    Ok,

    Thanks for the insight.

    See, the reason I have NOT posted any code
    in here was, that I didn't know how much of it
    (at most) would be considered good manners.

    Unless, of course, you were to tell me that posting
    a block of code that, however long, is compilable
    the first time out (simply via copy & paste to one's
    IDE's editor) - and then by looking at the compiler's
    messages (to be generated) one could tell what is
    wrong with that code.

    Crypto
     
    Crypto Loko, Oct 16, 2005
    #4
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