MultiThreading in C++

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by ktxn1020, Feb 6, 2007.

  1. ktxn1020

    ktxn1020 Guest

    Hi,

    I am pretty new to multithreaded programming. I have a question with a
    hope someone can help me out.

    I want to find distances between points using thread (Win MFC)

    For instance distance from:
    p1 to p2, p3, p4, p5
    p2 to p1, p3, p4, p5
    p3 to p1, p2, p4, p5
    p4 to p1, p2, p3, p5
    p5 to p1, p2, p3, p4

    with

    p1(x1, y1) = p1(42.67,73.75)
    p2(x2, y2) = p2 (61.22, 149.9)
    p3(x3, y3) = p3(30.27, 97.73)
    p4(x4, y4) = p4(35.18,101.83)
    p5(x5, y5) = p5(41.15, 104.87)


    using formular distance = square root (square (x2 - x1) + square (y2 -
    y1))

    How can I do it and what is the best way to do this?

    Thanks in advance,
     
    ktxn1020, Feb 6, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. ktxn1020 wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am pretty new to multithreaded programming. I have a question with
    > a hope someone can help me out.
    >
    > I want to find distances between points using thread (Win MFC)
    >
    > For instance distance from:
    > p1 to p2, p3, p4, p5
    > p2 to p1, p3, p4, p5
    > p3 to p1, p2, p4, p5
    > p4 to p1, p2, p3, p5
    > p5 to p1, p2, p3, p4
    >
    > with
    >
    > p1(x1, y1) = p1(42.67,73.75)
    > p2(x2, y2) = p2 (61.22, 149.9)
    > p3(x3, y3) = p3(30.27, 97.73)
    > p4(x4, y4) = p4(35.18,101.83)
    > p5(x5, y5) = p5(41.15, 104.87)
    >
    >
    > using formular distance = square root (square (x2 - x1) + square (y2
    > - y1))
    >
    > How can I do it and what is the best way to do this?
    >
    > Thanks in advance,


    The best way is to do your school assignments yourself ;-), you will
    benefit from it in the future the great deal. Besides, it may be the
    wrong list as Ruby is discussed here.

    Gennady.
     
    Gennady Bystritsky, Feb 6, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. ktxn1020

    Avdi Grimm Guest

    On 2/6/07, ktxn1020 <> wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am pretty new to multithreaded programming. I have a question with a
    > hope someone can help me out.


    First, this is a mailing list for the Ruby programming language, not
    C++. You would probably have better luck on a mailing list devoted to
    C++ programming, or on the comp.lang.c++ newsgroup.

    Second, why are on earth are you using threads to solve the problem you stated?

    --
    Avdi
     
    Avdi Grimm, Feb 6, 2007
    #3
  4. On Wed, Feb 07, 2007 at 06:59:41AM +0900, Francis Cianfrocca wrote:
    > The best way to solve this problem is not to use threads. It's local-compute
    > and local-memory bound so there is no capturable system latency. The problem
    > appears to be parallelizable to some degree. If you are sure you'll be
    > running it on multi-processor or multicore hardware, then break up the
    > dataset into multiple chunks, and run each one through a separate process.
    > Threads add nothing here.
    >

    *applauds*
     
    Logan Capaldo, Feb 6, 2007
    #4
  5. On Tue, 06 Feb 2007 22:59:41 +0100, Francis Cianfrocca
    <> wrote:

    > If you are sure you'll be
    > running it on multi-processor or multicore hardware, then break up the
    > dataset into multiple chunks, and run each one through a separate
    > process.
    > Threads add nothing here.
    >


    Threads for a single process only get scheduled on one of the cores? This
    is new to me, I thought at least on Windowsen, threads are the base
    scheduling unit.

    David Vallner
     
    David Vallner, Feb 7, 2007
    #5
  6. On 2/7/07, David Vallner <> wrote:
    > Threads for a single process only get scheduled on one of the cores? This
    > is new to me, I thought at least on Windowsen, threads are the base
    > scheduling unit.


    Difference between a Windows (native) thread and a Ruby (green)
    thread. The Ruby interpreter does not (yet) support native threads.

    pth
     
    Patrick Hurley, Feb 7, 2007
    #6
  7. On Wed, 07 Feb 2007 17:28:59 +0100, Patrick Hurley <>
    wrote:

    > On 2/7/07, David Vallner <> wrote:
    >> Threads for a single process only get scheduled on one of the cores?
    >> This
    >> is new to me, I thought at least on Windowsen, threads are the base
    >> scheduling unit.

    >
    > Difference between a Windows (native) thread and a Ruby (green)
    > thread. The Ruby interpreter does not (yet) support native threads.
    >


    The whole thread is horribly off-topic with C++ and MFC being involved
    from the beginning from someone who thought ruby-talk is there to work out
    his homework. So the threads in my (equally off-topic) question are in
    fact native Win32 threads.

    David Vallner
     
    David Vallner, Feb 8, 2007
    #7
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Boris Condarco

    Multithreading

    Boris Condarco, Jun 28, 2003, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    605
    Boris Condarco
    Jun 30, 2003
  2. Ilia
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    3,008
    John Saunders
    Nov 4, 2003
  3. Fieldadvice

    Multithreading with HttpWebRequest

    Fieldadvice, Nov 6, 2003, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,347
  4. Muralidharan Ramakrishnan

    MultiThreading

    Muralidharan Ramakrishnan, Nov 10, 2003, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    415
    Kevin Spencer
    Nov 10, 2003
  5. BoomWackaBoom

    Asynchronous requests vs. multithreading

    BoomWackaBoom, Nov 14, 2003, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    636
    Alvin Bruney
    Nov 15, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page