NetBeans noobie Q: Compiling for Windows and Mac

Discussion in 'Java' started by Mary Pegg, Dec 17, 2006.

  1. Mary Pegg

    Mary Pegg Guest

    Hi, I inherited a Java project, which involved a very simple change to
    the source to fix it, and I've now produced a working .jar file using
    NetBeans 5.5 (on Ubuntu 6.10).

    I'm a NetBeans noob.

    The original distribution (i.e. download directory) contained four files:
    proj-java.zip
    proj-osx.dmg.gz
    proj-win.zip
    proj-winjre.zip

    all about 6MB in size apart from the Windows JRE one (about 28MB).
    So far I've created a new proj-java.zip; how do I get NetBeans to
    produce the OS-specific files?

    Hope this is the appropriate newsgroup.
    Mary Pegg, Dec 17, 2006
    #1
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  2. Mary Pegg wrote:
    > Hi, I inherited a Java project, which involved a very simple change to
    > the source to fix it, and I've now produced a working .jar file using
    > NetBeans 5.5 (on Ubuntu 6.10).
    >
    > I'm a NetBeans noob.
    >
    > The original distribution (i.e. download directory) contained four files:
    > proj-java.zip
    > proj-osx.dmg.gz


    What is in this file? It sounds the one most closely
    related to Mac.

    > proj-win.zip
    > proj-winjre.zip
    >
    > all about 6MB in size apart from the Windows JRE one (about 28MB).


    Very few people would distribute a JRE, the only
    reasons I can think of to do so are..
    The company has an extremely fast LAN
    The product is only known to work using one single
    obscure JRE micro-version.

    What reason does this app. use?

    > So far I've created a new proj-java.zip; how do I get NetBeans to
    > produce the OS-specific files?


    What 'OS' specific files? The only OS specific files mentioned
    so far are the Win JRE, and while it would not be common
    to provide a Win JRE, I have never heard of 'private' vendors
    for Mac. Java - which is supplied by Macintosh, along with
    the OS (AFAIU).

    > Hope this is the appropriate newsgroup.


    This is a good one for this question, but I think
    we need a lot more details on this 'deployment'
    to help you.

    E.G. The file you listed were all Zip files - these might
    be 'launched' easily using web-start, but failing using
    web-start - what is the 'installation procedure'? What
    do each of the Zips contain? Do they contain 'loose'
    resources, or other Zip and Jar archives?
    Does the project include DLL's or .so files?

    (I am a little confused when you mention 'OS specific'
    files - good java projects should have very few resources
    which are specific to an OS. Beyond the JRE, it would
    be OS specific natives.. thats about it, I think)


    Andrew T.
    Andrew Thompson, Dec 18, 2006
    #2
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  3. Mary Pegg

    Mary Pegg Guest

    Andrew Thompson wrote:

    > Mary Pegg wrote:
    >> Hi, I inherited a Java project, which involved a very simple change to
    >> the source to fix it, and I've now produced a working .jar file using
    >> NetBeans 5.5 (on Ubuntu 6.10).
    >>
    >> I'm a NetBeans noob.
    >>
    >> The original distribution (i.e. download directory) contained four files:
    >> proj-java.zip
    >> proj-osx.dmg.gz

    >
    > What is in this file? It sounds the one most closely
    > related to Mac.


    Well it is, it's some sort of OS X disk image.

    >> proj-win.zip
    >> proj-winjre.zip
    >>
    >> all about 6MB in size apart from the Windows JRE one (about 28MB).

    >
    > Very few people would distribute a JRE, the only
    > reasons I can think of to do so are..
    > The company has an extremely fast LAN
    > The product is only known to work using one single
    > obscure JRE micro-version.
    >
    > What reason does this app. use?


    The website does some sort of test that Java is installed and
    if not then the user is directed to the file that includes the
    JRE.

    >> So far I've created a new proj-java.zip; how do I get NetBeans to
    >> produce the OS-specific files?

    >
    > What 'OS' specific files? The only OS specific files mentioned
    > so far are the Win JRE, and while it would not be common
    > to provide a Win JRE, I have never heard of 'private' vendors
    > for Mac. Java - which is supplied by Macintosh, along with
    > the OS (AFAIU).


    The OS specific files are proj-win.zip and proj-osx.dmg.gz.

    The Windows file unzips into an .exe. This .exe is a WinZip
    self-extracting file that runs an installer which creates
    C:\Program Files\Proj and puts the .jar and lib files in there.

    > (I am a little confused when you mention 'OS specific'


    Not just me, then. (I've inherited this project).
    I thought there might be a "standard" NetBeans way of producing
    these OS-specific installers, but it doesn't look like it.
    Mary Pegg, Dec 18, 2006
    #3
  4. Mary Pegg wrote:
    (trim the saga...)

    > Not just me, then. (I've inherited this project).
    > I thought there might be a "standard" NetBeans way of producing
    > these OS-specific installers, but it doesn't look like it.


    The 'standard' way to install and launch Java
    applications is using the Sun based web-start
    technology.

    It sounds like you would be better off dumping
    the current build/deployment system (which seems
    incredibly overblown to me), and looking into
    web-start to launch the app., with a little JS in
    a web page to determine if a suitable JWS
    service is avaialbe, and let the user know
    where to get it otherwise.

    Andrew T.
    Andrew Thompson, Dec 18, 2006
    #4
  5. Mary Pegg

    Mary Pegg Guest

    Andrew Thompson wrote:

    > a web page to determine if a suitable JWS
    > service is avaialbe, and let the user know
    > where to get it otherwise.


    This is presumably precisely what the current
    build is meant to avoid! It may be overblown
    but from the end user point of view the Windows
    deployment is 100% click-and-drool.
    Mary Pegg, Dec 18, 2006
    #5
  6. Mary Pegg

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    Mary Pegg wrote:
    > Andrew Thompson wrote:
    >
    > > a web page to determine if a suitable JWS
    > > service is avaialbe, and let the user know
    > > where to get it otherwise.

    >
    > This is presumably precisely what the current
    > build is meant to avoid! It may be overblown
    > but from the end user point of view the Windows
    > deployment is 100% click-and-drool.


    The JWS approach is 95% click-and-drool. It also happens to be a
    supported deployment mechanism on multiple architectures.
    Daniel Pitts, Dec 18, 2006
    #6
  7. Mary Pegg

    Mary Pegg Guest

    Daniel Pitts wrote:

    > Mary Pegg wrote:
    >>
    >> This is presumably precisely what the current
    >> build is meant to avoid! It may be overblown
    >> but from the end user point of view the Windows
    >> deployment is 100% click-and-drool.

    >
    > The JWS approach is 95% click-and-drool.


    Presumably the customer was given the option and decided
    that 100% was required. That 5% could be quite expensive
    in support calls.
    Mary Pegg, Dec 18, 2006
    #7
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