OO Database Design in C++

Discussion in 'C++' started by Josh McFarlane, May 23, 2005.

  1. If this is not the right place to post this, I apologize.

    I've taken over work for a few utility programs for a collection of
    database / raw files. All the programs but one read from the files, and
    as it is, many of the operations are done through standard non-OO code.
    All of the database information is currently stored in linked list
    structures. I'm looking to move the entire thing to objects.

    I'm defining generic database, table, and record classes, as well as
    base functions for the classes. Then I will define a specialized record
    class for each table and populate members inside the database class
    accordingly.

    This is the first time I've really tried to dig deep into OO with C++,
    so my question: Is this the right way to approach the design or is
    there a better method for C++?

    My overall goal is to standardize the code so when database design
    changes, all I need to do is modify the generic database classes and
    push those changes to the programs.

    Thanks in advance.
    Josh McFarlane
    Josh McFarlane, May 23, 2005
    #1
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  2. "Josh McFarlane" wrote:

    > I've taken over work for a few utility programs for a collection of
    > database / raw files. All the programs but one read from the files, and
    > as it is, many of the operations are done through standard non-OO code.
    > All of the database information is currently stored in linked list
    > structures. I'm looking to move the entire thing to objects.
    >
    > I'm defining generic database, table, and record classes, as well as
    > base functions for the classes. Then I will define a specialized record
    > class for each table and populate members inside the database class
    > accordingly.
    >

    You may try
    http://www.garret.ru/~knizhnik/databases.html

    Post++ and GOODS are ful-featured, mature OO databases.

    /Pavel
    Pavel Vozenilek, May 23, 2005
    #2
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  3. Josh McFarlane wrote:
    > If this is not the right place to post this, I apologize.
    >
    > I've taken over work for a few utility programs for a collection of
    > database / raw files. All the programs but one read from the files, and
    > as it is, many of the operations are done through standard non-OO code.
    > All of the database information is currently stored in linked list
    > structures. I'm looking to move the entire thing to objects.
    >
    > I'm defining generic database, table, and record classes, as well as
    > base functions for the classes. Then I will define a specialized record
    > class for each table and populate members inside the database class
    > accordingly.
    >
    > This is the first time I've really tried to dig deep into OO with C++,
    > so my question: Is this the right way to approach the design or is
    > there a better method for C++?


    The C++ language is so generic that any approach that solves the problems
    you identified is the right approach.

    I am not very versed in database management, so I don't have any specific
    advice to give in that area, however, there are quite a few books on the
    subject and there are database-centric newsgroups where folks would know
    more about how to [re-]design a database management system. I also seem
    to remember that there were OO DBMSes at some point, quite popular. One
    was called "POET", another was "c-tree", there were probably more. I am
    not sure if they are still around and what you can gain by looking at
    them, but c-tree used to ship in source code, so you could actually read
    it like a book on DBMS design.

    > [..]


    V
    Victor Bazarov, May 24, 2005
    #3
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