OT: great ideas for websites I wish I'd thought of first #134

Discussion in 'HTML' started by +mrcakey, Jul 21, 2008.

  1. +mrcakey

    +mrcakey Guest

    http://www.telebid.com/auction/sony-rdr-hxd1070-hdmi-dvd-recorder-500gb/84066.html

    Each "bid" is in 7p increments; they charge 50p for each bid. Most of the
    time, if you win, you get to pay the final value for the item as well PLUS
    postage.

    It's utter utter genius!

    For this item, the method is even more ingenius - the price is always going
    to be £39 - so the bidders that are paying 50p each time are bidding ad
    infinitum knowing that they'll only ever be paying the £39 PLUS the cost of
    their bids. So far it's up to £351.75. That's 5025 bids, i.e. £2512.50!!!!
    MAN I WISH I'D THOUGHT OF THAT FIRST!

    The utter genius of it is that the person who wins probably has got a
    bargain - ten bids = £5 plus £39 plus postage for £450 worth of kit. Oh so
    clever...

    Damn it!!!!

    --

    +mrcakey
     
    +mrcakey, Jul 21, 2008
    #1
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  2. +mrcakey

    Morten Holt Guest

    Re: great ideas for websites I wish I'd thought of first #134

    Brian Cryer wrote:
    > "+mrcakey" <> wrote in message
    > news:g621pc$cdd$...
    >>
    >> Each "bid" is in 7p increments; they charge 50p for each bid. Most of
    >> the time, if you win, you get to pay the final value for the item as
    >> well PLUS postage.
    >>
    >> It's utter utter genius!

    >
    > Its a waste of time and money - I know because my daughter persuaded me
    > to sign up so I could get a laptop for her "cheap". Fortunatly I read
    > how it worked before committing any money. Each time a "bid" is placed
    > the end time is reset. Each bid is only an increment of 7p over the
    > previous, so its not a bid in the convential sense. Since each "bid"
    > costs you 50p, and the final price only goes up by 7p each time, more
    > often than not the bidding only ends when everyone gives up or has
    > emptied their bank accounts. It must be a brilliant way of the website
    > owners raking it in, but not very good for the end customers.
    >
    > I'd recommnd you stick with eBay.

    I think you misunderstood the OP.
    It's a great idea for a website, not for the user, but the owner. If OP
    had thought of it first, he could've been the once making thousands of £

    --
    Morten Holt


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    Morten Holt, Jul 21, 2008
    #2
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  3. +mrcakey

    +mrcakey Guest

    Re: great ideas for websites I wish I'd thought of first #134

    Indeed.

    That £450 DVD recorder / HDD had £3409 spent on it! AFAICT, the winning
    bidder alone spent £1318 on it. How, I don't know. Unless he's affiliated
    to the website and wasn't actually spending any money. Oooh, now there's a
    slanderous comment...

    +mrcakey
     
    +mrcakey, Jul 22, 2008
    #3
  4. +mrcakey

    Morten Holt Guest

    Re: great ideas for websites I wish I'd thought of first #134

    Brian Cryer wrote:
    > "Morten Holt" <> wrote in message
    > news:g62amk$i3c$...
    > Brian Cryer wrote:
    >>> "+mrcakey" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:g621pc$cdd$...
    >>>>
    >>>> Each "bid" is in 7p increments; they charge 50p for each bid. Most of
    >>>> the time, if you win, you get to pay the final value for the item as
    >>>> well PLUS postage.
    >>>>
    >>>> It's utter utter genius!
    >>>
    >>> Its a waste of time and money - I know because my daughter persuaded me
    >>> to sign up so I could get a laptop for her "cheap". Fortunatly I read
    >>> how it worked before committing any money. Each time a "bid" is placed
    >>> the end time is reset. Each bid is only an increment of 7p over the
    >>> previous, so its not a bid in the convential sense. Since each "bid"
    >>> costs you 50p, and the final price only goes up by 7p each time, more
    >>> often than not the bidding only ends when everyone gives up or has
    >>> emptied their bank accounts. It must be a brilliant way of the website
    >>> owners raking it in, but not very good for the end customers.
    >>>
    >>> I'd recommnd you stick with eBay.

    >> I think you misunderstood the OP.
    >> It's a great idea for a website, not for the user, but the owner. If OP
    >> had thought of it first, he could've been the once making thousands of £

    >
    > I stand corrected on the OP's intent. My mistake.
    >
    > I agree that its great for the website, but not at all for the user. I
    > feel like its a type of scam, although in a typical scam they aren't
    > open and up front about how it works.

    I don't think it's fair to call it a scam actually, one reason being
    their being upfront about it.
    >
    > BTW, I don't know what newsgroup reader you are posting with but at my
    > end your post was an attachment and I had to copy and paste it into this
    > to retain the context.

    I am sorry about that, it could have something to do with my PGP
    signature perhaps? I have disabled it on this account, which should
    solve the issue I hope.

    --
    Morten 'T-Hawk' Holt
    In the joy of anticipation there's the anticipatory
    letdown of anticipating not anticipating anticipation
    of some future anticipation.
     
    Morten Holt, Jul 22, 2008
    #4
  5. +mrcakey

    BootNic Guest

    On Tue, 22 Jul 2008 22:21:53 +0200
    Morten Holt <> wrote in:
    <g65fh2$sbu$>

    > Brian Cryer wrote:
    >> "Morten Holt" <> wrote in message
    >> news:g62amk$i3c$...
    >> Brian Cryer wrote:

    [snip]
    >>
    >> BTW, I don't know what newsgroup reader you are posting with but at my
    >> end your post was an attachment and I had to copy and paste it into this
    >> to retain the context.

    > I am sorry about that, it could have something to do with my PGP
    > signature perhaps? I have disabled it on this account, which should
    > solve the issue I hope.


    No need to be sorry mate. Windows Mail has issues with multipart/signed
    messages. Any broken news reader may have issues, it's not the message.

    Even google groups can read a multipart/signed message :-O.

    --

    BootNic Wed Jul 23, 2008 11:55 am
    A conclusion is the place where you get tired of thinking.
    *Arthur Bloch*

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    BootNic, Jul 23, 2008
    #5
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