Processing Print jobs through Java before sending them to Novell iPrint

Discussion in 'Java' started by dwalter, Oct 24, 2005.

  1. dwalter

    dwalter Guest

    Hi I want to process all print jobs through java, before letting them
    print to enforce such things as print quotas and add banner pages and
    such to the various print jobs. But the one thing I can't figgure out
    is how to catch the print job before the printer starts printing it.
    dwalter, Oct 24, 2005
    #1
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  2. dwalter

    Rationem Guest

    Maybe java isn't the best programming language to do this in......
    sounds like C might provide some better inferfaces to catch lower level
    controls and simulate the print queue
    Rationem, Oct 25, 2005
    #2
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  3. dwalter

    Roedy Green Guest

    On 24 Oct 2005 13:40:49 -0700, "dwalter" <> wrote,
    quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

    >Hi I want to process all print jobs through java, before letting them
    >print to enforce such things as print quotas and add banner pages and
    >such to the various print jobs. But the one thing I can't figgure out
    >is how to catch the print job before the printer starts printing it.


    The Javaesque way to do that would be to build a wrapper around one or
    more of the System printing classes that added the additional
    functionality and just use discipline to use that new class instead.

    Java's philosophy is to maintain class integrity. Nobody gets to
    insert code or modify code in a class unless the original author
    explicitly designed for it.
    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Again taking new Java programming contracts.
    Roedy Green, Oct 25, 2005
    #3
  4. dwalter

    steve Guest

    On Tue, 25 Oct 2005 04:40:49 +0800, dwalter wrote
    (in article <>):

    > Hi I want to process all print jobs through java, before letting them
    > print to enforce such things as print quotas and add banner pages and
    > such to the various print jobs. But the one thing I can't figgure out
    > is how to catch the print job before the printer starts printing it.
    >


    why are you not using IPrint for this?
    To write a print spooler in java is madness, have you any idea of the typical
    volume of data sent from a computer to a print spooler?

    Steve
    steve, Oct 25, 2005
    #4
  5. dwalter

    dwalter Guest

    >why are you not using IPrint for this?

    I am trying too, but I dont't understand how to call a java program
    from IPrint, and have it modify the right job. I know IPrint can send
    out events but I don't know how to intergrate java with that.
    dwalter, Oct 25, 2005
    #5
  6. dwalter

    Roedy Green Guest

    On 24 Oct 2005 13:40:49 -0700, "dwalter" <> wrote,
    quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

    >Hi I want to process all print jobs through java,


    Did you mean my that all print jobs inside a particular java app or
    all print jobs in the machine, including ones written in other
    languages? I assumed the first when I answered.

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Again taking new Java programming contracts.
    Roedy Green, Oct 25, 2005
    #6
  7. dwalter

    dwalter Guest

    all print jobs that are send to the print server from the labs. The
    single most important feature is the ability to check the users
    printing account to check that they can pay before printing anything. I
    can do this checking on the server side or on the client side but I
    need to do it somehow. When approved it should then print.
    dwalter, Oct 25, 2005
    #7
  8. dwalter

    Roedy Green Guest

    On 25 Oct 2005 06:26:15 -0700, "dwalter" <> wrote,
    quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

    >I am trying too, but I dont't understand how to call a java program
    >from IPrint, and have it modify the right job. I know IPrint can send
    >out events but I don't know how to intergrate java with that.


    What sort of interface does Iprint offer? If you really want to do
    this, consider another separate Java program that runs all the time
    and takes work requests from Iprint.

    How might the connection work, in descending order of plausibility:

    1. jni

    2. raw socket.

    3. shared file.

    4. shared SQL database.

    5. Java side is a Servlet Womb liseting to requests coming in via HTTP
    and sending back HTML.


    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Again taking new Java programming contracts.
    Roedy Green, Oct 25, 2005
    #8
  9. dwalter

    steve Guest

    On Tue, 25 Oct 2005 22:06:56 +0800, Roedy Green wrote
    (in article <>):

    > On 25 Oct 2005 06:26:15 -0700, "dwalter" <> wrote,
    > quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :
    >
    >> I am trying too, but I dont't understand how to call a java program
    >> from IPrint, and have it modify the right job. I know IPrint can send
    >> out events but I don't know how to intergrate java with that.

    >
    > What sort of interface does Iprint offer? If you really want to do
    > this, consider another separate Java program that runs all the time
    > and takes work requests from Iprint.
    >
    > How might the connection work, in descending order of plausibility:
    >
    > 1. jni
    >
    > 2. raw socket.
    >
    > 3. shared file.
    >
    > 4. shared SQL database.
    >
    > 5. Java side is a Servlet Womb liseting to requests coming in via HTTP
    > and sending back HTML.
    >
    >
    >


    CHRISSSSSTT!!

    novell's iPrint, is novells backend print system. it handles security ,
    Auditing , accounting , headers, job control , spooling Etc.

    It is time for this guy to get the novell manuals out.

    After users install an iPrint printer on their computer, they can use iPrint
    client software to access that printer's NDPS Printer Operations page. As you
    probably know, the Printer Operations page includes printer information that
    you can't access through the Windows Printers folder. For example, the
    Printer Operations page enables you to view the number of print jobs that
    have been submitted to a printer before you send a print job to that printer.
    In contrast, as you know, you must send a print job to a printer before you
    can view this information through the Windows Printers folder. (See Figure
    4.)
    Users can also use the Printer Operations page to find out if an iPrint
    printer is experiencing a paper jam, is low on toner, or is out of paper
    before they print to that printer. In addition, the Printer Operations page
    displays information about the printer's make and model, the languages the
    printer supports, and whether or not the printer is a color printer.
    To view the Printer Operations page for an iPrint printer that is already
    installed on a user's computer, the user uses his or her browser to access
    either the iPrint default web page or an iPrint map. When the user clicks to
    select a previously installed printer from either of these locations, iPrint
    client software displays the Printer Operations page for that printer.



    A BRIEF HISTORY OF SIMPLIFIED PRINTING
    iPrint runs on top of Novell Distributed Print Services (NDPS) 2.1.2 or
    later. (NDPS version 2.1.2 is included in Support Pack 2a for NetWare 5.1.
    You can download Support Pack 2a from
    http://support.novell.com/misc/patlst.htm#nw.) NDPS, as you probably know, is
    Novell's print services software for NetWare 4.11 and above. NDPS meets two
    complementary goals:
    € Simplify printer setup and management
    € Simplify users' printing experience
    For example, NDPS 1.0 for NetWare 4.11--the first version of NDPS--replaced
    queue-based print services with distributed print services. As a result, you
    create only one Novell Directory Services (NDS) object for each printer on
    your company's network. You also use only one utility to manage all print
    tasks through this one object.
    In contrast, with queue-based printing, you must create three NDS objects for
    every printer. To manage print tasks for these printers, you then use several
    utilities--including the NetWare Administrator (NWADMIN) utility, the PSERVER
    utility, and the printer management utilities provided by the manufacturers
    of the printers.
    NDPS 1.0 also simplifies printing for users. For example, users no longer
    need to perform queue-based tasks such as capturing printer ports. (For more
    information about the benefits of NDPS 1.0, see "NDPS: Good-bye, Queue
    World!" Novell Connection, Oct. 1997, pp 6-22.)
    Novell provides another tool that further simplifies network printing,
    NetWare Enterprise Print Services (NEPS). NEPS--which is a separate printing
    product for NetWare 4.11 and 5.0 servers--adds management capabilities to
    NDPS running on these servers. These capabilities are also available for
    NetWare 5.1 servers with NDPS 2.1.1, which ships with NetWare 5.1.
    Specifically, NEPS and NDPS 2.1.1 further simplify administrative tasks by
    enabling you to manage print services for UNIX, Macintosh, and mainframe
    users. Prior to NEPS and NDPS 2.1.1, you had to set up and manage print
    services for these users separately. (For more information about NEPS, See
    "NetWare Enterprise Print Services: Print Services Made Easy," Novell
    Connection, Dec. 1999, pp. 24-35.)
    NEPS and NDPS 2.1.1 include a Line Printer Remote/Line Printer Daemon
    (LPR/LPD) server. LPR is a UNIX print command that links files to a spooling
    area on a print server. LPD then copies these files to a printer. You can
    also configure Macintosh workstations and several mainframe systems to use
    LPR/LPD.
    NEPS and NDPS 2.1.1 also include an IPP 1.0 server, which enables users who
    have IPP client software and an Internet connection to print to NDPS printers
    over the Internet. iPrint updates and enhances NDPS to make printing over the
    Internet as easy for users as printing over the local network. In fact,
    iPrint essentially extends NDPS to include IPP access to NDPS printers.
    steve, Oct 27, 2005
    #9
  10. dwalter

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Fri, 28 Oct 2005 05:10:01 +0800, steve <> wrote,
    quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

    >novell's iPrint, is novells backend print system. it handles security ,
    >Auditing , accounting , headers, job control , spooling Etc.


    Your point is if he dug around, he would discover he did not need to
    do ANY custom coding at all. Somewhere in there is all the
    functionality he already needs?

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Java custom programming, consulting and coaching.
    Roedy Green, Oct 31, 2005
    #10
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