python-dev Summary for 2003-12-01 through 2003-12-31

Discussion in 'Python' started by Brett, Jan 11, 2004.

  1. Brett

    Brett Guest

    python-dev Summary for 2003-12-01 through 2003-12-31
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    This is a summary of traffic on the `python-dev mailing list`_ from
    December 1, 2003 through December 31, 2003. It is intended to inform
    the wider Python community of on-going developments on the list. To
    comment on anything mentioned here, just post to `comp.lang.python`_ (or
    email which is a gateway to the newsgroup) with a
    subject line mentioning what you are discussing. All python-dev members
    are interested in seeing ideas discussed by the community, so don't
    hesitate to take a stance on something. And if all of this really
    interests you then get involved and join `python-dev`_!

    This is the thirty-first and -second summaries written by Brett Cannon
    (a friend of a friend actually reads this thing! Hi, Elle).

    To contact me, please send email to brett at python.org ; I do not have
    the time to keep up on comp.lang.python and thus do not always catch
    follow-ups posted there.

    All summaries are archived at http://www.python.org/dev/summary/ .

    Please note that this summary is written using reStructuredText_ which
    can be found at http://docutils.sf.net/rst.html . Any unfamiliar
    punctuation is probably markup for reST_ (otherwise it is probably
    regular expression syntax or a typo =); you can safely ignore it,
    although I suggest learning reST; it's simple and is accepted for `PEP
    markup`_ and gives some perks for the HTML output. Also, because of the
    wonders of programs that like to reformat text, I cannot guarantee you
    will be able to run the text version of this summary through Docutils_
    as-is unless it is from the original text file.

    ... _PEP Markup: http://www.python.org/peps/pep-0012.html

    The in-development version of the documentation for Python can be found
    at http://www.python.org/dev/doc/devel/ and should be used when looking
    up any documentation on something mentioned here. PEPs (Python
    Enhancement Proposals) are located at http://www.python.org/peps/ . To
    view files in the Python CVS online, go to
    http://cvs.sourceforge.net/cgi-bin/viewcvs.cgi/python/ . Reported bugs
    and suggested patches can be found at the SourceForge_ project page.

    The `Python Software Foundation`_ is the non-profit organization that
    holds the intellectual property for Python. It also tries to forward
    the development and use of Python. But the PSF cannot do this without
    donations. You can make a donation at
    http://python.org/psf/donations.html . Every penny helps so even a
    small donation (you can donate through PayPal or by check) helps.

    ... _python-dev: http://www.python.org/dev/
    ... _SourceForge: http://sourceforge.net/tracker/?group_id=5470
    ... _python-dev mailing list:
    http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-dev
    ... _comp.lang.python: http://groups.google.com/groups?q=comp.lang.python
    ... _Docutils: http://docutils.sf.net/
    ... _reST:
    ... _reStructuredText: http://docutils.sf.net/rst.html
    ... _Python Software Foundation: http://python.org/psf/

    ... contents::

    ... _last summary:
    http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2003-10-16_2003-11-15.html


    =====================
    Summary Announcements
    =====================
    Sorry if this summary comes off as light, but I caught the flu the week
    of Christmas and it developed into walking pneumonia which I still have.

    On a more positive note, PyCon is hitting its stride. Online
    registration is available at http://pycon.org/dc2004 and early bird
    registration ends January 31. Online talk proposal submission is online
    at http://submit.pycon.org/ and the deadline is January 15.


    =========
    Summaries
    =========
    ----------------------------
    2.3.3 released to the masses
    ----------------------------
    `Python 2.3.3`_ has gone out the door. Thanks to Anthony Baxter for
    being release manager (again!) and to all of python-dev and anyone who
    contributed code for this release. With this being a bugfix release
    this supercedes 2.3.2 and thus people should upgrade if possible.

    ... _Python 2.3.3: http://python.org/2.3.3/

    Contributing threads:
    - `2.3.3 cycle
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040550.html>`__
    - `release23-maint branch CLOSED for release
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040852.html>`__
    - `Berkeley support in release23-maint
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041004.html>`__
    - `RELEASED Python 2.3.3 (release candidate 1)
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040740.html>`__
    - `2.3.3 portability audit
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041167.html>`__
    - `2.3.3 and beyond
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041183.html>`__
    - `RELEASED Python 2.3.3 (final)
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041286.html>`__
    - `status of 2.3 branch for maintenance checkins
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041424.html>`__


    ----------------------------------
    Pie-thon competition work ramps up
    ----------------------------------
    `Dan Sugalski`_, project leader of the Parrot_ VM that will be used for
    `Perl 6`_, reminded the list that the benchmark to be used for the
    `Pie-thon`_ needed to be written since the bytecode for the benchmark
    needed to be frozen.

    So Guido wrote some benchmarks. They are in CVS under
    nondist/sandbox/parrotbench .

    ... _Dan Sugalski: http://www.sidhe.org/~dan/blog/
    ... _Parrot: http://www.parrotcode.org/
    ... _Perl 6: http://dev.perl.org/perl6/
    ... _Pie-thon: http://www.sidhe.org/~dan/blog/archives/000219.html

    Contributing threads:
    - `Merry December
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040613.html>`__
    - `Pie-thon benchmarks
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040963.html>`__
    - `Pie-thon benchmark code ready
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041527.html>`__


    --------------
    PyCon is a go!
    --------------
    http://www.pycon.org/ has gone live! Registration_ is live (early-bird
    ends January 31)! Online talk proposal submission is live (deadline is
    January 15)!

    ... _Registration: http://www.pycon.org/dc2004

    Contributing threads:
    - `PyCon DC 2004 - Registration about to open!
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040553.html>`__
    - `PyCon DC 2004 - Submissions Now Open
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041012.html>`__


    ----------------------------------------
    operator gains attrgetter and itemgetter
    ----------------------------------------
    The operator module has now gained two new functions: attrgetter and
    itemgetter "which are useful for creating fast data extractor functions
    for map(), list.sort(), itertools.groupby(), and other functions that
    expect a function argument" according to Misc/NEWS .

    Contributing threads:
    - `Re: "groupby" iterator
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040590.html>`__


    -------------------
    CObjects and safety
    -------------------
    Michael Hudson pointed out how CObjects could be misused in Python code.
    Various ideas of how to make them safer by checking that the proper
    CObject was passed were proposed. The thread seemed to end without a
    resolution, though.

    Contributing threads:
    - `are CObjects inherently unsafe?
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040702.html>`__


    -----------------
    Unicode is a pain
    -----------------
    Want proof? How about the fact that you can store a character like "ä"
    either as two characters ("a" followed by "previous character has an
    umlaut") or as one ("a with an umlaut"). The former is called
    "decomposed normal form" and is used in OS X. Windows, of course, uses
    the latter version.

    Contributing threads:
    - `test_unicode_file failing on Mac OS X
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040778.html>`__


    ------------------
    Two new developers
    ------------------
    Hye-Shik Chang has become a developer. You probably know him from his
    work on the CJK codecs. He is now an official developer.

    Vinay Sajip, implementor of the logging package has also been granted
    CVS checkin rights.

    Contributing threads:
    - `New developer
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040808.html>`__


    ------------------------
    Compiling 2.4 under .NET
    ------------------------
    Martin v. Löwis has started sandbox work on an MSI installer and moving
    Python 2.4 over to VC 7.

    Contributing threads:
    - `Py2.4 pre-alpha snapshot
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040784.html>`__
    - `First version of Python MSI available
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041451.html>`__
    - `Switching to VC.NET 2003
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041452.html>`__


    -----------------------------
    New method flag: METH_COEXIST
    -----------------------------
    Raymond Hettinger, in his continual pursuit of speed, came up with a new
    method flag, METH_COEXIST, which causes a method to be used in place of
    a slot wrapper. The example that actually led to this is __contains__:
    a PyCFunction defining __contains__ tends to be faster than one in the
    sq_contains slot thanks to METH_O and other tricks.

    Contributing threads:
    - `FW: METH_COEXIST
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040940.html>`__


    ------------------------------
    Better relative import support
    ------------------------------
    There was a huge discussion on a better way to handle relative imports
    (think of the situation where you have your module ``import sys`` and
    you happen to have a module named sys in the same directory; should that
    local module be imported or the sys module from the stdlib?). Luckily
    Aahz volunteered to write a PEP on the whole thread so I am being spared
    from having to summarize the thing. =) Thanks, Aahz.

    Contributing threads:
    - `Re: Christmas Wishlist
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/040973.html>`__
    - `Re: Python-Dev Digest, Vol 5, Issue 57
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041078.html>`__
    - `Relative import
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041065.html>`__
    - `Another Strategy for Relative Import
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041418.html>`__


    ------------------------------
    list.sorted becomes a built-in
    ------------------------------
    Just as the title says, list.sorted has now been moved out of the list
    type and has been made a built-in.

    Contributing threads:
    - `python/dist/src/Python bltinmodule.c,2.304,2.305
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041129.html>`__


    --------------------------------
    What to do with old Python code?
    --------------------------------
    Someone rewrote the bisect module in C. This brought up the question of
    what to do with the old Python version. Some suggest moving it to the
    Demo directory. Others suggest keeping the code but importing the C
    version in the Python module. The idea of keeping both was quickly shot
    down, though, like in the pickle/cPickle situation.

    This discussion is still going at this time.

    Contributing threads:
    - `SF patch 864863: Bisect C implementation
    <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2003-December/041511.html>`__
    Brett, Jan 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. First: thanks Brett, for the summary. And get well soon from your pneumonia.

    Brett wrote:

    > ------------------------
    > Compiling 2.4 under .NET
    > ------------------------
    > Martin v. Löwis has started sandbox work on an MSI installer and moving
    > Python 2.4 over to VC 7.


    MSI? Why, what is wrong with the old installer?
    I'm not too fond of MSI installers, I find them slow and large.
    Especially when using lots of files. That may be a problem in the
    installer script, but almost all MSI installers I encountered were
    extremely slow when installing and deinstalling a program that
    consists of a lot of files (and Python does).
    (I must note that this is much less so with recent versions
    than before, because the help files are no longer in seperate
    html files but in a single chm file).

    --Irmen
    Irmen de Jong, Jan 11, 2004
    #2
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  3. Brett

    Brett C. Guest

    Irmen de Jong <> wrote in message news:<4001a488$0$317$4all.nl>...
    > First: thanks Brett, for the summary. And get well soon from your pneumonia.
    >


    Thanks. The doctor has cleared me of pneumonia. Now if the funky
    feeling in my lower back when I bend over would just go away I would
    be willing to claim I am perfectly healthy.

    > Brett wrote:
    >
    > > ------------------------
    > > Compiling 2.4 under .NET
    > > ------------------------
    > > Martin v. Löwis has started sandbox work on an MSI installer and moving
    > > Python 2.4 over to VC 7.

    >
    > MSI? Why, what is wrong with the old installer?
    > I'm not too fond of MSI installers, I find them slow and large.
    > Especially when using lots of files. That may be a problem in the
    > installer script, but almost all MSI installers I encountered were
    > extremely slow when installing and deinstalling a program that
    > consists of a lot of files (and Python does).
    > (I must note that this is much less so with recent versions
    > than before, because the help files are no longer in seperate
    > html files but in a single chm file).
    >


    I am guessing here, but I think it has to do with maintennance and
    modernization. The WISE installer was only maintained by Tim Peters
    and he has been hella (too much time in Berkeley) busy for a while
    now. Moving over to MSI allows Martin to handle it along with anyone
    else who has experience with MSI installers (which seems to be more
    than WISE from the emails on the list). Decentralizing reliance on
    individuals is important in case someone falls off the face of the
    earth. The Python 2.3 releases have mostly been handled by people who
    did not usually handle it. Yes, there were some issues, but now there
    a bunch more people who know how to deal with a release.

    Beyond that I don't know since I am an OS X user now and just compile
    from source. =)

    -Brett
    Brett C., Jan 19, 2004
    #3
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