Reading sound output in Java

Discussion in 'Java' started by GGolf, Oct 22, 2013.

  1. GGolf

    GGolf Guest

    Is there a way to read the output that the speakers produce?
    GGolf, Oct 22, 2013
    #1
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  2. GGolf

    Lew Guest

    GGolf wrote:
    > Is there a way to read the output that the speakers produce?


    Are you talking about using a microphone to record the speaker sound,
    and reading that in a program?

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Oct 24, 2013
    #2
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  3. GGolf

    GGolf Guest

    On 10/24/2013 4:30 AM, Lew wrote:
    > GGolf wrote:
    >> Is there a way to read the output that the speakers produce?

    >
    > Are you talking about using a microphone to record the speaker sound,
    > and reading that in a program?
    >

    Yes, but using software instead of hardware. Basically, the "Stereo Mix"
    option that most systems had built-in years ago.
    GGolf, Oct 24, 2013
    #3
  4. GGolf

    Jeff Higgins Guest

    On 10/24/2013 06:13 AM, GGolf wrote:
    > On 10/24/2013 4:30 AM, Lew wrote:
    >> GGolf wrote:
    >>> Is there a way to read the output that the speakers produce?

    >>
    >> Are you talking about using a microphone to record the speaker sound,
    >> and reading that in a program?
    >>

    > Yes, but using software instead of hardware. Basically, the "Stereo Mix"
    > option that most systems had built-in years ago.


    A pretty vague question. Here's a vague response.
    http://www.developerfusion.com/article/84314/wired-for-sound/
    http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/sound/index.html
    http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/sound/programmer_guide/contents.html
    http://www.developerfusion.com/article/84314/wired-for-sound/
    Jeff Higgins, Oct 24, 2013
    #4
  5. GGolf

    Lew Guest

    On Thursday, October 24, 2013 3:13:23 AM UTC-7, GGolf wrote:
    > On 10/24/2013 4:30 AM, Lew wrote:
    >
    > > GGolf wrote:
    >>> Is there a way to read the output that the speakers produce?

    >
    >> Are you talking about using a microphone to record the speaker sound,
    >> and reading that in a program?

    >
    > Yes, but using software instead of hardware. Basically, the "Stereo Mix"
    > option that most systems had built-in years ago.


    You're contradicting yourself, or else I'm not getting you. You said "Yes" to the
    microphone question, but you aren't using hardware. What?

    I have no notion of what you mean by the "Stereo Mix" option.

    How about you actually define for us precisely what you want to do?

    Then maybe someone can help you.

    Here's the thing: how else will you capture what the speakers produce if you
    don't use a microphone?

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Oct 24, 2013
    #5
  6. GGolf

    Jeff Higgins Guest

    On 10/24/2013 02:18 PM, Lew wrote:
    > On Thursday, October 24, 2013 3:13:23 AM UTC-7, GGolf wrote:
    >> On 10/24/2013 4:30 AM, Lew wrote:
    >>
    >>> GGolf wrote:
    >>>> Is there a way to read the output that the speakers produce?

    >>
    >>> Are you talking about using a microphone to record the speaker sound,
    >>> and reading that in a program?

    >>
    >> Yes, but using software instead of hardware. Basically, the "Stereo Mix"
    >> option that most systems had built-in years ago.

    >
    > You're contradicting yourself, or else I'm not getting you. You said "Yes" to the
    > microphone question, but you aren't using hardware. What?
    >
    > I have no notion of what you mean by the "Stereo Mix" option.
    >
    > How about you actually define for us precisely what you want to do?
    >
    > Then maybe someone can help you.
    >
    > Here's the thing: how else will you capture what the speakers produce if you
    > don't use a microphone?
    >

    stereo+mix+java I suspect shows results for what he is after
    a search on javasound brings much more info
    Jeff Higgins, Oct 24, 2013
    #6
  7. GGolf

    Jeff Higgins Guest

    On 10/24/2013 04:27 PM, Jeff Higgins wrote:
    > On 10/24/2013 02:18 PM, Lew wrote:
    >> On Thursday, October 24, 2013 3:13:23 AM UTC-7, GGolf wrote:
    >>> On 10/24/2013 4:30 AM, Lew wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> GGolf wrote:
    >>>>> Is there a way to read the output that the speakers produce?
    >>>
    >>>> Are you talking about using a microphone to record the speaker sound,
    >>>> and reading that in a program?
    >>>
    >>> Yes, but using software instead of hardware. Basically, the "Stereo Mix"
    >>> option that most systems had built-in years ago.

    >>
    >> You're contradicting yourself, or else I'm not getting you. You said
    >> "Yes" to the
    >> microphone question, but you aren't using hardware. What?
    >>
    >> I have no notion of what you mean by the "Stereo Mix" option.
    >>
    >> How about you actually define for us precisely what you want to do?
    >>
    >> Then maybe someone can help you.
    >>
    >> Here's the thing: how else will you capture what the speakers produce
    >> if you
    >> don't use a microphone?
    >>

    > stereo+mix+java I suspect shows results for what he is after
    > a search on javasound brings much more info
    >

    I also suspect he might find what he wants in the Java Sound Tutorial
    <http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/sound/index.html>
    Jeff Higgins, Oct 24, 2013
    #7
  8. GGolf

    Jens Guest

    On Tue, 22 Oct 2013 08:52:45 +0530, GGolf <> wrote:

    >Is there a way to read the output that the speakers produce?

    Richard Baldwin has many fully functional and well commented examples on Java Sound.
    http://www.dickbaldwin.com/tocadv.htm
    Scoll down to Java Sound.

    The subject of Java Sound is very large and can be a bit overwhelming for the
    uninitiated.
    His examples are the best I have seen on Java Sound.

    Another source of information is
    http://www.jsresources.org/faq.html
    Treats Java Sound to great detail.

    JensJ
    Jens, Oct 25, 2013
    #8
  9. GGolf

    Joerg Meier Guest

    On Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:18:03 -0700 (PDT), Lew wrote:

    > On Thursday, October 24, 2013 3:13:23 AM UTC-7, GGolf wrote:
    >> On 10/24/2013 4:30 AM, Lew wrote:
    >>> GGolf wrote:
    >>>> Is there a way to read the output that the speakers produce?
    >>> Are you talking about using a microphone to record the speaker sound,
    >>> and reading that in a program?

    >> Yes, but using software instead of hardware. Basically, the "Stereo Mix"
    >> option that most systems had built-in years ago.

    > You're contradicting yourself, or else I'm not getting you. You said "Yes" to the
    > microphone question, but you aren't using hardware. What?


    > I have no notion of what you mean by the "Stereo Mix" option.


    In Windows (and. presumably, other OSs), you can record "What you hear", as
    in, you can record whatever your speakers are playing. This is done on a
    software level, so it works even if you have no speakers or microphones. It
    seems to just intercept and copy the data that gets sent to the speaker
    output. I would guess that's what he want.

    Liebe Gruesse,
    Joerg

    --
    Ich lese meine Emails nicht, replies to Email bleiben also leider
    ungelesen.
    Joerg Meier, Oct 25, 2013
    #9
  10. GGolf

    Lew Guest

    Joerg Meier wrote:
    > Lew wrote:
    >> GGolf wrote:
    > >> Lew wrote:
    > >>> GGolf wrote:
    > >>>> Is there a way to read the output that the speakers produce?

    >
    > >>> Are you talking about using a microphone to record the speaker sound,
    > >>> and reading that in a program?

    >
    > >> Yes, but using software instead of hardware. Basically, the "Stereo Mix"
    > >> option that most systems had built-in years ago.

    >
    > > You're contradicting yourself, or else I'm not getting you. You said "Yes" to the
    > > microphone question, but you aren't using hardware. What?

    >
    > > I have no notion of what you mean by the "Stereo Mix" option.

    >
    >
    > In Windows (and. presumably, other OSs), you can record "What you hear", as
    > in, you can record whatever your speakers are playing. This is done on a
    > software level, so it works even if you have no speakers or microphones. It
    > seems to just intercept and copy the data that gets sent to the speaker
    > output. I would guess that's what he want.


    Maybe, but what he asked for was "the output that the speakers produce", not the
    signal that is input to the speakers.

    If he wants the signal as sent to the speakers, does he want the actual electrical
    signal, decoded and turned into some file format, or does he want a copy of the
    MP3 or WAV or whatever generated that signal, or what?

    You can guess all you want, but absent the *OP* answering the question, it is only a guess.

    As another responder said, the question is vague, and certainly ambiguous.

    So, OP, how about it? Are you going to ask a good question, or give up on getting a
    good answer?

    The technique you use will depend on exactly what you want.

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Oct 25, 2013
    #10
  11. GGolf

    GGolf Guest

    On 10/26/2013 3:26 AM, Lew wrote:
    > Joerg Meier wrote:
    >> Lew wrote:
    >>> GGolf wrote:
    >>>> Lew wrote:
    >>>>> GGolf wrote:
    >>>>>> Is there a way to read the output that the speakers produce?

    >>
    >>>>> Are you talking about using a microphone to record the speaker sound,
    >>>>> and reading that in a program?

    >>
    >>>> Yes, but using software instead of hardware. Basically, the "Stereo Mix"
    >>>> option that most systems had built-in years ago.

    >>
    >>> You're contradicting yourself, or else I'm not getting you. You said "Yes" to the
    >>> microphone question, but you aren't using hardware. What?

    >>
    >>> I have no notion of what you mean by the "Stereo Mix" option.

    >>
    >>
    >> In Windows (and. presumably, other OSs), you can record "What you hear", as
    >> in, you can record whatever your speakers are playing. This is done on a
    >> software level, so it works even if you have no speakers or microphones. It
    >> seems to just intercept and copy the data that gets sent to the speaker
    >> output. I would guess that's what he want.

    >
    > Maybe, but what he asked for was "the output that the speakers produce", not the
    > signal that is input to the speakers.


    Sorry for being so vague. I should have said "the signal that is input
    to the speakers".

    >
    > If he wants the signal as sent to the speakers, does he want the actual electrical
    > signal, decoded and turned into some file format, or does he want a copy of the
    > MP3 or WAV or whatever generated that signal, or what?
    >


    I _think_ either will do.

    Let me tell you the use case: I want to
    (i) capture a VOIP conversation (which could be between multiple
    participants, or just two participants), and
    (ii) convert that to text using a speech recognizer (using one of the
    various implementations of JSAPI), and
    (iii) display that text on screen.

    Note that this will also mean that I should be able to capture the input
    to the microphone at the same time. However, if I just get the signal
    that's input to the speakers, I think that would be a great beginning -
    I could at least transcribe the incoming side.

    > You can guess all you want, but absent the *OP* answering the question, it is only a guess.
    >
    > As another responder said, the question is vague, and certainly ambiguous.
    >
    > So, OP, how about it? Are you going to ask a good question, or give up on getting a
    > good answer?


    I hope I've clarified the question at least a little more, based on your
    useful hints.

    I also aim to try experimenting with the Java Sound API as suggested by
    JensJ and others elsethread.

    >
    > The technique you use will depend on exactly what you want.
    >
    GGolf, Oct 26, 2013
    #11
  12. GGolf <> wrote:
    > Let me tell you the use case: I want to
    > (i) capture a VOIP conversation (which could be between multiple
    > participants, or just two participants), and
    > (ii) convert that to text using a speech recognizer (using one of the
    > various implementations of JSAPI), and
    > (iii) display that text on screen.


    Is this going to happen real-time? (I have no idea if consumer-grade
    speech-to-text is fast enough for that.)

    If so, I'd use a second PC (thus with independent sound system) with
    a microphone & line-in(connected to a "Y"-split of the headphones' cable)
    to capture both outgoing and incoming speech.
    Unless you've got some very special sound hardware on the primary (VoIP
    running) machine, capturing both input and output (where input isn't
    itself mixed into the output) may just not be possible.

    PS: note, that recording of conversations may have legal issues, so make
    sure that at the start of the recording everyone involved knows it and
    agrees to it. (this may not be relevant if the signal is used *only* for
    speech-to-text and displaying of text, and neither text nor signal are
    saved, but I'm not a lawyer.) If you were from NSA, then you probably
    wouldn't need to ask here in the first place...
    Andreas Leitgeb, Oct 26, 2013
    #12
  13. GGolf

    GGolf Guest

    On 10/26/2013 3:02 PM, Andreas Leitgeb wrote:
    > GGolf <> wrote:
    >> Let me tell you the use case: I want to
    >> (i) capture a VOIP conversation (which could be between multiple
    >> participants, or just two participants), and
    >> (ii) convert that to text using a speech recognizer (using one of the
    >> various implementations of JSAPI), and
    >> (iii) display that text on screen.

    >
    > Is this going to happen real-time? (I have no idea if consumer-grade
    > speech-to-text is fast enough for that.)


    I've seen a couple of demos where this has been done, though I guess the
    participants have to speak slower than usual for the transcription to
    make some sense.

    >
    > If so, I'd use a second PC (thus with independent sound system) with
    > a microphone & line-in(connected to a "Y"-split of the headphones' cable)
    > to capture both outgoing and incoming speech.
    > Unless you've got some very special sound hardware on the primary (VoIP
    > running) machine, capturing both input and output (where input isn't
    > itself mixed into the output) may just not be possible.


    Hmm...I think you got a point here. I remember that the Stereo Mix
    option on Windows wouldn't record the input to the microphone unless you
    would /play it back/ to the speakers.

    >
    > PS: note, that recording of conversations may have legal issues, so make
    > sure that at the start of the recording everyone involved knows it and
    > agrees to it. (this may not be relevant if the signal is used *only* for
    > speech-to-text and displaying of text, and neither text nor signal are
    > saved, but I'm not a lawyer.)


    Only the text is going to be displayed (the user can save the transcript
    if they want, but it won't go anywhere by itself).

    > If you were from NSA, then you probably
    > wouldn't need to ask here in the first place...
    >


    True :)
    GGolf, Oct 26, 2013
    #13
  14. GGolf <> wrote:
    >> Unless you've got some very special sound hardware on the primary (VoIP
    >> running) machine, capturing both input and output (where input isn't
    >> itself mixed into the output) may just not be possible.

    > Hmm...I think you got a point here. I remember that the Stereo Mix
    > option on Windows wouldn't record the input to the microphone unless you
    > would /play it back/ to the speakers.


    The core of the problem appears to be that there is only one sound-device
    on a typical system, and the mixer settings are a property of that one device,
    not per-process.

    If the VoIP application obviously specifically requires to record only the
    microphone (in order to transmit it to the parties), then another process
    cannot have its own settings to record everything.

    I'm not sure if you need a recording solution for yourself, or if you
    intended to create a transcription add-on to be used by Joe "VoIP" User.
    If it was the latter, then I fear it won't be that easy. If you create
    your own VoIP client that would be a different story, and also if there
    was an existing VoIP client with a decent API for plugging into the sound
    stream.
    Andreas Leitgeb, Oct 26, 2013
    #14
  15. GGolf

    Jeff Higgins Guest

    On 10/26/2013 07:45 AM, Andreas Leitgeb wrote:
    > GGolf <> wrote:
    >>> Unless you've got some very special sound hardware on the primary (VoIP
    >>> running) machine, capturing both input and output (where input isn't
    >>> itself mixed into the output) may just not be possible.

    >> Hmm...I think you got a point here. I remember that the Stereo Mix
    >> option on Windows wouldn't record the input to the microphone unless you
    >> would /play it back/ to the speakers.

    >
    > The core of the problem appears to be that there is only one sound-device
    > on a typical system, and the mixer settings are a property of that one device,
    > not per-process.
    >
    > If the VoIP application obviously specifically requires to record only the
    > microphone (in order to transmit it to the parties), then another process
    > cannot have its own settings to record everything.
    >
    > I'm not sure if you need a recording solution for yourself, or if you
    > intended to create a transcription add-on to be used by Joe "VoIP" User.
    > If it was the latter, then I fear it won't be that easy. If you create
    > your own VoIP client that would be a different story, and also if there
    > was an existing VoIP client with a decent API for plugging into the sound
    > stream.
    >

    <http://licensing.ttu.edu/technologies/d-0205/vocal-recognition-with-speech-signal-processing-for-voice-over-ip-and-medical-transcription>
    Jeff Higgins, Oct 26, 2013
    #15
  16. GGolf

    Jeff Higgins Guest

    On 10/26/2013 11:36 AM, Jeff Higgins wrote:
    >>

    > <http://licensing.ttu.edu/technologies/d-0205/vocal-recognition-with-speech-signal-processing-for-voice-over-ip-and-medical-transcription>
    >

    <http://www.cs.jhu.edu/~fabian/papers/oakland08.pdf>
    Jeff Higgins, Oct 26, 2013
    #16
  17. GGolf

    Jeff Higgins Guest

    On 10/26/2013 04:47 AM, GGolf wrote:
    > On 10/26/2013 3:26 AM, Lew wrote:
    >> Joerg Meier wrote:
    >>> Lew wrote:
    >>>> GGolf wrote:
    >>>>> Lew wrote:
    >>>>>> GGolf wrote:
    >>>>>>> Is there a way to read the output that the speakers produce?
    >>>
    >>>>>> Are you talking about using a microphone to record the speaker sound,
    >>>>>> and reading that in a program?
    >>>
    >>>>> Yes, but using software instead of hardware. Basically, the "Stereo
    >>>>> Mix"
    >>>>> option that most systems had built-in years ago.
    >>>
    >>>> You're contradicting yourself, or else I'm not getting you. You said
    >>>> "Yes" to the
    >>>> microphone question, but you aren't using hardware. What?
    >>>
    >>>> I have no notion of what you mean by the "Stereo Mix" option.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> In Windows (and. presumably, other OSs), you can record "What you
    >>> hear", as
    >>> in, you can record whatever your speakers are playing. This is done on a
    >>> software level, so it works even if you have no speakers or
    >>> microphones. It
    >>> seems to just intercept and copy the data that gets sent to the speaker
    >>> output. I would guess that's what he want.

    >>
    >> Maybe, but what he asked for was "the output that the speakers
    >> produce", not the
    >> signal that is input to the speakers.

    >
    > Sorry for being so vague. I should have said "the signal that is input
    > to the speakers".
    >
    >>
    >> If he wants the signal as sent to the speakers, does he want the
    >> actual electrical
    >> signal, decoded and turned into some file format, or does he want a
    >> copy of the
    >> MP3 or WAV or whatever generated that signal, or what?
    >>

    >
    > I _think_ either will do.
    >
    > Let me tell you the use case: I want to
    > (i) capture a VOIP conversation (which could be between multiple
    > participants, or just two participants), and
    > (ii) convert that to text using a speech recognizer (using one of the
    > various implementations of JSAPI), and
    > (iii) display that text on screen.
    >
    > Note that this will also mean that I should be able to capture the input
    > to the microphone at the same time. However, if I just get the signal
    > that's input to the speakers, I think that would be a great beginning -
    > I could at least transcribe the incoming side.
    >
    >> You can guess all you want, but absent the *OP* answering the
    >> question, it is only a guess.
    >>
    >> As another responder said, the question is vague, and certainly
    >> ambiguous.
    >>
    >> So, OP, how about it? Are you going to ask a good question, or give up
    >> on getting a
    >> good answer?

    >
    > I hope I've clarified the question at least a little more, based on your
    > useful hints.
    >
    > I also aim to try experimenting with the Java Sound API as suggested by
    > JensJ and others elsethread.
    >
    >>
    >> The technique you use will depend on exactly what you want.
    >>

    >

    There may be some help around about here:
    <http://cmusphinx.sourceforge.net/sphinx4/>
    <http://cmusphinx.sourceforge.net/sphinx4/javadoc/edu/cmu/sphinx/tools/audio/doc-files/HowToRunAudioTool.html>
    Jeff Higgins, Oct 26, 2013
    #17
  18. GGolf

    Jeff Higgins Guest

    On 10/26/2013 11:49 AM, Jeff Higgins wrote:
    > On 10/26/2013 11:36 AM, Jeff Higgins wrote:
    >>>

    >> <http://licensing.ttu.edu/technologies/d-0205/vocal-recognition-with-speech-signal-processing-for-voice-over-ip-and-medical-transcription>
    >>
    >>

    > <http://www.cs.jhu.edu/~fabian/papers/oakland08.pdf>
    >
    >

    <http://www.deweyhagborg.com/listeningPost/> :)
    Jeff Higgins, Oct 26, 2013
    #18
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