Reasons to consider learning Ruby?

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Preston Crawford, Jan 21, 2005.

  1. I'm completely new to Ruby and Python. I'd like to learn another language
    I currently know most of the Microsoft mainstays like VB, C#, ASP,
    VBScript as well as JavaScript, Java, PHP, etc. I'm interested in learning
    another scripting language, mostly for fast proto-typing and also because
    I have a gut feeling, that at least in Open Source circles, languages like
    Python and Ruby are starting to pick up steam for glueing together
    applications. Now with the news on Slashdot about Rails (as a web
    developer by profession) Ruby has gained my attention.

    So I'm wondering, for what reasons should I consider learning Ruby? I'm a
    "Big Book" type of guy. I love buying one of those tree-killers and diving
    into a new language. I'm trying to decide whether my next language to
    learn will be Ruby or Python. I already know a bit about what makes Python
    good. So my question to you guys is, why Ruby?

    Also, do any of you have a feeling as to the future of Ruby? I know these
    things can change on a dime, but my main interest in this regard is that I
    know many shops are considering non-web-based Open Source solutions to
    replacing existing Visual C++ and VB applications. Acting as an oracle
    (i.e. taking a guess :) ) what kind of future do you think Ruby has in
    this regard?

    Thanks!

    Preston
     
    Preston Crawford, Jan 21, 2005
    #1
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  2. Preston Crawford

    Tim Hunter Guest

    Preston Crawford wrote:

    > I'm completely new to Ruby and Python. I'd like to learn another language
    > I currently know most of the Microsoft mainstays like VB, C#, ASP,
    > VBScript as well as JavaScript, Java, PHP, etc. I'm interested in learning
    > another scripting language, mostly for fast proto-typing and also because
    > I have a gut feeling, that at least in Open Source circles, languages like
    > Python and Ruby are starting to pick up steam for glueing together
    > applications. Now with the news on Slashdot about Rails (as a web
    > developer by profession) Ruby has gained my attention.
    >
    > So I'm wondering, for what reasons should I consider learning Ruby? I'm a
    > "Big Book" type of guy. I love buying one of those tree-killers and diving
    > into a new language. I'm trying to decide whether my next language to
    > learn will be Ruby or Python. I already know a bit about what makes Python
    > good. So my question to you guys is, why Ruby?


    This is something of a perma-thread on this n.g. so probably the best thing
    for you to do is to go do some searching on google groups for previous
    discussions.

    Also here's a couple of web pages:
    http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?PythonVsRuby
    http://www.ruby-doc.org/RubyEyeForThePythonGuy.html
     
    Tim Hunter, Jan 21, 2005
    #2
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  3. Preston Crawford wrote:
    > I'm completely new to Ruby and Python. I'd like to learn another language
    > I currently know most of the Microsoft mainstays like VB, C#, ASP,
    > VBScript as well as JavaScript, Java, PHP, etc. I'm interested in learning
    > another scripting language, mostly for fast proto-typing and also because
    > I have a gut feeling, that at least in Open Source circles, languages like
    > Python and Ruby are starting to pick up steam for glueing together
    > applications. Now with the news on Slashdot about Rails (as a web
    > developer by profession) Ruby has gained my attention.
    >
    > So I'm wondering, for what reasons should I consider learning Ruby? I'm a
    > "Big Book" type of guy. I love buying one of those tree-killers and diving
    > into a new language. I'm trying to decide whether my next language to
    > learn will be Ruby or Python. I already know a bit about what makes Python
    > good. So my question to you guys is, why Ruby?
    >
    > Also, do any of you have a feeling as to the future of Ruby? I know these
    > things can change on a dime, but my main interest in this regard is that I
    > know many shops are considering non-web-based Open Source solutions to
    > replacing existing Visual C++ and VB applications. Acting as an oracle
    > (i.e. taking a guess :) ) what kind of future do you think Ruby has in
    > this regard?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Preston
    >


    Buy yourself a "Big Book" called "Programming Ruby, The Pragmatic
    Programmers' Guide" by Dave Thomas and get enlightened ;-). You can get
    the book at http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/catalog/index.html

    Alternatively, you can search the ruby-talk archives at
    http://www.ruby-talk.org/ruby/ruby-talk/index.shtml

    for something like "Ruby vs. Python". You will find a lot of "why Ruby"
    reasons there.

    Read, compare, decide for yourself. Do not expect anybody to set you on
    "the right road".

    Gennady.

    P.S. Your post is very generic and smells like a troll (I beg your
    pardon if it is not), so do not expect a lot of responces here, people
    are just tired.
     
    Gennady Bystritksy, Jan 21, 2005
    #3
  4. Preston Crawford

    Joao Pedrosa Guest

    Hi,

    > So my question to you guys is, why Ruby?
    >
    > Also, do any of you have a feeling as to the future of Ruby? I know these
    > things can change on a dime, but my main interest in this regard is that I
    > know many shops are considering non-web-based Open Source solutions to
    > replacing existing Visual C++ and VB applications. Acting as an oracle
    > (i.e. taking a guess :) ) what kind of future do you think Ruby has in
    > this regard?


    As some people might say, this has been discussed before so
    comp.lang.ruby can be searched on google. :)

    But I believe in Ruby and the people that make Ruby what it is. If you
    consider that people have different abilities and motivations, then
    you might imagine that the people that make Python are different than
    the people that make Ruby.

    That said, i think that the code on the core and the libs of Ruby are
    very high level and very open for use. Couple that with the nice mix
    of features that are unique of Ruby, then you have a killer base for
    new software.

    One inspired programmer created the base of the Rails framework. So it
    may take one inspired programmer for every library that we may ever
    need. If you don't find your killer library, build it with Ruby,
    enjoying what's available already. Join forces with the community if
    you ever need.

    In the end, it's about getting inspired. :)

    Cheers,
    Joao
     
    Joao Pedrosa, Jan 21, 2005
    #4
  5. On 2005-01-21, Gennady Bystritksy <> wrote:
    > Buy yourself a "Big Book" called "Programming Ruby, The Pragmatic
    > Programmers' Guide" by Dave Thomas and get enlightened ;-). You can get
    > the book at http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/catalog/index.html


    Thanks!

    > Alternatively, you can search the ruby-talk archives at
    > http://www.ruby-talk.org/ruby/ruby-talk/index.shtml


    Thanks again!

    > Read, compare, decide for yourself. Do not expect anybody to set you on
    > "the right road".


    Of course. I wasn't expecting all the answers. And believe me, I Googled
    this topic to death. The problem is, that it always seems to end up in...

    "Python is more mature"
    "Ruby is more fun"
    "Python has more libraries"

    ...etc etc

    I'm coming at this as someone who really likes the look of Ruby and I
    guess I'm trying to find out if investing time in learning it (aside from
    just what you gain from learning the language) is worth it in terms of
    things you can actually do with it and how easily they can be done. I know
    that's a little vague, but I meant it to be vague, mostly, minus the last
    part.

    > P.S. Your post is very generic and smells like a troll (I beg your
    > pardon if it is not), so do not expect a lot of responces here, people
    > are just tired.


    Understood. It's definitely not a troll, though. No offense take. I
    understand how these things go (especially after Googling). If you reread
    my last part of my post, that should tell you that I'm 100% serious about
    hearing about how Ruby is being used out in the real world and what Ruby
    developers think of its chances. By that I mean that any time one learns a
    language there's obviously an investment in time if you want to get
    something out of it. Since I don't know Python, nor Ruby, but have
    leanings towards Ruby, my question was born out of sincere interest to
    know what some of you thought its future held, in particular as a language
    to develop desktop applications that need to be developed quickly. It
    looks to me like both Python and Ruby have a bright future, not just as
    web languages, but also in the afforementioned capacity, as languages to
    do RAD work where you don't want to use VB or you want to move away from
    VB or VC++. That's my primary interest and thus the reason I asked what
    you all thought of its future in that regard.

    Preston
     
    Preston Crawford, Jan 21, 2005
    #5
  6. On 2005-01-21, Joao Pedrosa <> wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    >> So my question to you guys is, why Ruby?
    >>
    >> Also, do any of you have a feeling as to the future of Ruby? I know these
    >> things can change on a dime, but my main interest in this regard is that I
    >> know many shops are considering non-web-based Open Source solutions to
    >> replacing existing Visual C++ and VB applications. Acting as an oracle
    >> (i.e. taking a guess :) ) what kind of future do you think Ruby has in
    >> this regard?

    >
    > As some people might say, this has been discussed before so
    > comp.lang.ruby can be searched on google. :)


    Of course. I've Googled this topic thoroughly. And (as mentioned in my
    other response) the conclusions reached are generally the same. So the
    tie-breaker from me, aside from how enjoyable a language is to use, is
    what the future of the language holds. Thus my last paragraph. I'm
    interested in learning a langauge where there's at least some potential
    that down the road I might be able to use this do the same kind of work
    that is done on the Microsoft side of the world with VB. i.e. Quick RAD
    using a good quality language with hooks into a decent GUI toolkit. This
    is the part I don't know as much about Ruby or Python. Other than I'm
    aware that Python has pyQT, etc. But I have leanings towards Ruby, just in
    terms of syntax and the way the language is constructed. That's why I
    asked here.

    > But I believe in Ruby and the people that make Ruby what it is. If you
    > consider that people have different abilities and motivations, then
    > you might imagine that the people that make Python are different than
    > the people that make Ruby.
    >
    > That said, i think that the code on the core and the libs of Ruby are
    > very high level and very open for use. Couple that with the nice mix
    > of features that are unique of Ruby, then you have a killer base for
    > new software.


    That's what I gather. I've done Java for years. But sometimes you just
    want to get things done. Thus my interest.

    > One inspired programmer created the base of the Rails framework. So it
    > may take one inspired programmer for every library that we may ever
    > need. If you don't find your killer library, build it with Ruby,
    > enjoying what's available already. Join forces with the community if
    > you ever need.
    >
    > In the end, it's about getting inspired. :)


    Thank you! That helps.

    Preston
     
    Preston Crawford, Jan 21, 2005
    #6
  7. Preston Crawford wrote:
    > So I'm wondering, for what reasons should I consider learning Ruby? I'm a
    > "Big Book" type of guy. I love buying one of those tree-killers and diving
    > into a new language. I'm trying to decide whether my next language to


    It seems that the 'pickaxe' is for you. You can get it at:
    http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/titles/ruby/index.html

    It's up to date (covers Ruby 1.8.x) and really really well written.
    It has a 'tutorial style' part as well as a reference to the Ruby
    standard library.

    > learn will be Ruby or Python. I already know a bit about what makes Python
    > good. So my question to you guys is, why Ruby?


    These are my reasons:
    - The community is friendly, helpful and open minded
    - It's easy to learn
    - For me it works well on both 'unixoide' OSes and Windows
    - It's readable code with out much 'noise' (semicolons,
    parentheses...)
    - It doesn't enforce one single program layout (indentation,
    parentheses...)
    - There's 'test/unit', YAML, RedCloth, Rails (you mentioned it),
    RDoc, ri and oh-so-many useful (and easy to use too) libs etc.
    - A lot of Design Patterns are 'built in' or easy to realize
    (Visitor, Observer, Delegator...)
    - It's a very dynamic language
    - It's fun to work with
    - I get things done right in a short time (among other things
    thanks to 'test/unit')
    - It fits my way of thinking


    > Also, do any of you have a feeling as to the future of Ruby? I know these
    > things can change on a dime, but my main interest in this regard is that I
    > know many shops are considering non-web-based Open Source solutions to
    > replacing existing Visual C++ and VB applications. Acting as an oracle
    > (i.e. taking a guess :) ) what kind of future do you think Ruby has in
    > this regard?


    Good question. I don't think Ruby will replace any of the
    extremely-wide-spread languages any time soon. And I don't mind. In
    fact, I think an extremely larger Ruby community would (at least) tend
    to be less kind, less helpful and less responsive.

    Happy rubying

    Stephan
     
    Stephan Kämper, Jan 21, 2005
    #7
  8. On Jan 22, 2005, at 12:25 AM, Preston Crawford wrote:
    > Of course. I've Googled this topic thoroughly. And (as mentioned in my
    > other response) the conclusions reached are generally the same. So the
    > tie-breaker from me, aside from how enjoyable a language is to use, is
    > what the future of the language holds. Thus my last paragraph. I'm
    > interested in learning a langauge where there's at least some potential
    > that down the road I might be able to use this do the same kind of work
    > that is done on the Microsoft side of the world with VB. i.e. Quick RAD
    > using a good quality language with hooks into a decent GUI toolkit.
    > This
    > is the part I don't know as much about Ruby or Python. Other than I'm
    > aware that Python has pyQT, etc. But I have leanings towards Ruby,
    > just in
    > terms of syntax and the way the language is constructed. That's why I
    > asked here.


    ruby has qtruby. if you have time. compare the sources.
    you'll understand afterwards why you should choose ruby :)
    clever people gather around ruby for some reason, i'm yet
    to understand why this is. i guess its something about ruby :)

    Alex
     
    Alexander Kellett, Jan 21, 2005
    #8
  9. Preston Crawford wrote:

    > Also, do any of you have a feeling as to the future of Ruby? I know these
    > things can change on a dime, but my main interest in this regard is that I
    > know many shops are considering non-web-based Open Source solutions to
    > replacing existing Visual C++ and VB applications. Acting as an oracle
    > (i.e. taking a guess :) ) what kind of future do you think Ruby has in
    > this regard?


    See http://www.rubygarden.org/ruby?RealWorldRuby for how Ruby is getting
    used. Lately we have received lots of coverage because of the wonderful
    Rails framework, there's lots of interesting applications getting
    implemented in it like for example 43things.com.

    I think we'll continue to grow rapidly in that direction, though I'm
    pretty sure we can also do well in other areas.

    Regarding rapid development of desktop GUIs you might be interested in
    http://developer.kde.org/language-bindings/ruby/,
    http://visualwx.altervista.org/ and Glade in combination with Ruby-GTK2.
    (wxWidgets looks native on pretty much all platforms and GTK2 can at
    least look native on Windows as well.)

    Personally, I've used Ruby in lots of areas successful already and am
    pretty sure that the language will continue to grow.

    Other than that just enjoy yourself and don't worry too much about the
    future. After all making the future happen is one of the things that's
    fun to do with Ruby.
     
    Florian Gross, Jan 21, 2005
    #9
  10. Hi Preston,

    I just started learning Ruby and a bit of Python last year, and I'll
    share my experience.

    Personally, I found comparing Ruby to Python a bit awkward. I read the
    great Ruby Python comparisons on various wikis, but some how kept
    ending up on Lisp pages (more later).

    As for the direct comparison, there was the "more OO", "more fun",
    "less libraries" aspect, but I really got a sense of why I liked Ruby
    when I started looking at Smalltalk and Lisp.

    1. most of the same language dynamic language benefits of python (a
    rough and brutal summary- Perl in a readable, maintainable and OO
    form)
    2. more OO
    3. more expression-oriented (python seperates expressions and statements).

    Nothing that was earth shattering to me, but I was an OO enthusiast,
    and quite liked Perl and it's conciseness, so Ruby looked nice, not
    yet considering libraries, existing apps, and industry acceptence.

    What really made it click for me was looking at Smalltalk and Lisp
    comparisons. Ruby has been called both Smalltalk-inspired and an
    infix-notation dialect of Lisp. That enables:

    4. creating DSLs (domain specific languages)
    A paraphrasing a comment on slashdot on the rails article today- if
    Python didn't have list comprehensions already, it would nearly
    impossible to add them. If ruby didn't, it would be fairly easy.

    and
    5. bottom-up programming to coincide with top-down. This somewhat
    implies implementing a custom DSL as your program your application.

    Paul Graham was useful in considering these:
    Bottom-up programming:
    http://www.paulgraham.com/progbot.html

    What Made Lisp Different:
    http://www.paulgraham.com/diff.html

    Succinctness is Power
    http://www.paulgraham.com/power.html

    Ultimately, DSL+succintness (and indirectly expresion-orientation)
    made me choose Ruby. I don't know if this is the incredible benefit as
    postulated by Graham. There are links to strong Lisp people defending
    Python at the bottom of articles. But ultimately, I find it fits my
    mind and how I like to think about programming.

    Don't know much Python yet, but plan to learn some in a few months
    time permitting to compare. I'm also learning some Scheme and
    Smalltalk to inform my Ruby programming.

    And as for the Ruby libraries, I love them and haven't found too many
    things that I'm missing for my needs.

    Regards,
    Nick
    --
    Nicholas Van Weerdenburg

    On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 07:20:57 +0900, Preston Crawford
    <> wrote:
    > I'm completely new to Ruby and Python. I'd like to learn another language
    > I currently know most of the Microsoft mainstays like VB, C#, ASP,
    > VBScript as well as JavaScript, Java, PHP, etc. I'm interested in learning
    > another scripting language, mostly for fast proto-typing and also because
    > I have a gut feeling, that at least in Open Source circles, languages like
    > Python and Ruby are starting to pick up steam for glueing together
    > applications. Now with the news on Slashdot about Rails (as a web
    > developer by profession) Ruby has gained my attention.
    >
    > So I'm wondering, for what reasons should I consider learning Ruby? I'm a
    > "Big Book" type of guy. I love buying one of those tree-killers and diving
    > into a new language. I'm trying to decide whether my next language to
    > learn will be Ruby or Python. I already know a bit about what makes Python
    > good. So my question to you guys is, why Ruby?
    >
    > Also, do any of you have a feeling as to the future of Ruby? I know these
    > things can change on a dime, but my main interest in this regard is that I
    > know many shops are considering non-web-based Open Source solutions to
    > replacing existing Visual C++ and VB applications. Acting as an oracle
    > (i.e. taking a guess :) ) what kind of future do you think Ruby has in
    > this regard?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Preston
    >
    >
     
    Nicholas Van Weerdenburg, Jan 22, 2005
    #10
  11. Preston Crawford

    RCS Guest

    If an advice from a newly converted Python to Ruby programmer (I have
    used Python for more than 6 years) is of any worth:

    go with Ruby!


    Ruby is simply a better designed language, better syntax, a more truly
    object-oriented language, and as far as libraries goes, Ruby catches on
    fast.

    RCS
     
    RCS, Jan 22, 2005
    #11
  12. Preston Crawford

    James Britt Guest

    Nicholas Van Weerdenburg wrote:
    > Hi Preston,
    >
    > I just started learning Ruby and a bit of Python last year, and I'll
    > share my experience.
    >
    > Personally, I found comparing Ruby to Python a bit awkward. I read the
    > great Ruby Python comparisons on various wikis, but some how kept
    > ending up on Lisp pages (more later).
    >

    ...

    > Ultimately, DSL+succintness (and indirectly expresion-orientation)
    > made me choose Ruby. I don't know if this is the incredible benefit as
    > postulated by Graham. There are links to strong Lisp people defending
    > Python at the bottom of articles.


    I realize that what follows is a near-match for what might ordinarily
    pass for either trolling or flame-baiting, but when I read a recent blog
    entry about Python I nearly shot coffee out my nose:

    http://www.genehack.org/2005/01/13#lisp-with-shitty-syntax

    Two too-funny quotes:

    "It's like they stole Lisp, and give it shitty syntax!"

    and

    "[P]erhaps Python was the subset of Lisp that was understandable by C++
    programmers."



    James
     
    James Britt, Jan 22, 2005
    #12
  13. On 2005-01-21, Stephan Kmper <> wrote:
    > Preston Crawford wrote:
    >> So I'm wondering, for what reasons should I consider learning Ruby? I'm a
    >> "Big Book" type of guy. I love buying one of those tree-killers and diving
    >> into a new language. I'm trying to decide whether my next language to

    >
    > It seems that the 'pickaxe' is for you. You can get it at:
    > http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/titles/ruby/index.html
    >
    > It's up to date (covers Ruby 1.8.x) and really really well written.
    > It has a 'tutorial style' part as well as a reference to the Ruby
    > standard library.


    Picked this up tonight. Thanks for all the heads up, everyone!

    >> learn will be Ruby or Python. I already know a bit about what makes Python
    >> good. So my question to you guys is, why Ruby?

    >
    > These are my reasons:
    > - The community is friendly, helpful and open minded
    > - It's easy to learn
    > - For me it works well on both 'unixoide' OSes and Windows
    > - It's readable code with out much 'noise' (semicolons,
    > parentheses...)
    > - It doesn't enforce one single program layout (indentation,
    > parentheses...)
    > - There's 'test/unit', YAML, RedCloth, Rails (you mentioned it),
    > RDoc, ri and oh-so-many useful (and easy to use too) libs etc.
    > - A lot of Design Patterns are 'built in' or easy to realize
    > (Visitor, Observer, Delegator...)
    > - It's a very dynamic language
    > - It's fun to work with
    > - I get things done right in a short time (among other things
    > thanks to 'test/unit')
    > - It fits my way of thinking


    That all sounds good. Actually, what sold me was when I read that it
    helped some people understand OO better. Which I think is great. I've been
    doing Java for 3 years now. So I'm still Jr. level in Java. So it would be
    a nice side benefit if the language I learned for fun, also helped me to
    understand OOP better. Sometimes you can get bogged down in Java
    implementation and (especially if you don't have the time to stop and
    really spend learning the language inside and out) not have as good a
    handle on design patterns, etc.

    >> things can change on a dime, but my main interest in this regard is that I
    >> know many shops are considering non-web-based Open Source solutions to
    >> replacing existing Visual C++ and VB applications. Acting as an oracle
    >> (i.e. taking a guess :) ) what kind of future do you think Ruby has in
    >> this regard?

    >
    > Good question. I don't think Ruby will replace any of the
    > extremely-wide-spread languages any time soon. And I don't mind. In
    > fact, I think an extremely larger Ruby community would (at least) tend
    > to be less kind, less helpful and less responsive.


    Maybe no. Anyway, thanks.

    Preston
     
    Preston Crawford, Jan 22, 2005
    #13
  14. On 2005-01-22, RCS <> wrote:
    > If an advice from a newly converted Python to Ruby programmer (I have
    > used Python for more than 6 years) is of any worth:
    >
    > go with Ruby!
    >
    >
    > Ruby is simply a better designed language, better syntax, a more truly
    > object-oriented language, and as far as libraries goes, Ruby catches on
    > fast.


    This helps too. Since essentially the competition for my time and "big
    book" money was Python. In the ended I ended up getting the 2nd edition
    PickAxe. I'm excited.

    Preston
     
    Preston Crawford, Jan 22, 2005
    #14
  15. On 2005-01-22, Nicholas Van Weerdenburg <> wrote:
    > Hi Preston,
    >
    > I just started learning Ruby and a bit of Python last year, and I'll
    > share my experience.
    >
    > Personally, I found comparing Ruby to Python a bit awkward. I read the
    > great Ruby Python comparisons on various wikis, but some how kept
    > ending up on Lisp pages (more later).


    I did the same thing and noticed the same trend. I also noticed Perl
    mentioned over and over again as lineage for Ruby.

    > As for the direct comparison, there was the "more OO", "more fun",
    > "less libraries" aspect, but I really got a sense of why I liked Ruby
    > when I started looking at Smalltalk and Lisp.


    That was part of why I went ahead and bought the Ruby book. I'd rather
    spend my time on something pure OO.

    > Regards,
    > Nick


    Thanks,

    Preston
     
    Preston Crawford, Jan 22, 2005
    #15
  16. On 2005-01-21, Tim Hunter <> wrote:
    > Preston Crawford wrote:
    >
    >> I'm completely new to Ruby and Python. I'd like to learn another language
    >> I currently know most of the Microsoft mainstays like VB, C#, ASP,
    >> VBScript as well as JavaScript, Java, PHP, etc. I'm interested in learning
    >> another scripting language, mostly for fast proto-typing and also because
    >> I have a gut feeling, that at least in Open Source circles, languages like
    >> Python and Ruby are starting to pick up steam for glueing together
    >> applications. Now with the news on Slashdot about Rails (as a web
    >> developer by profession) Ruby has gained my attention.
    >>
    >> So I'm wondering, for what reasons should I consider learning Ruby? I'm a
    >> "Big Book" type of guy. I love buying one of those tree-killers and diving
    >> into a new language. I'm trying to decide whether my next language to
    >> learn will be Ruby or Python. I already know a bit about what makes Python
    >> good. So my question to you guys is, why Ruby?

    >
    > This is something of a perma-thread on this n.g. so probably the best thing
    > for you to do is to go do some searching on google groups for previous
    > discussions.
    >
    > Also here's a couple of web pages:
    > http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?PythonVsRuby
    > http://www.ruby-doc.org/RubyEyeForThePythonGuy.html


    Thanks. I read much of what was here and it was very helpful in making my
    decision. Thanks.

    Preston
     
    Preston Crawford, Jan 22, 2005
    #16
  17. Preston Crawford

    Phil Tomson Guest

    In article <>,
    Preston Crawford <> wrote:
    >On 2005-01-21, Gennady Bystritksy <> wrote:
    >Of course. I wasn't expecting all the answers. And believe me, I Googled
    >this topic to death. The problem is, that it always seems to end up in...
    >
    >"Python is more mature"
    >"Ruby is more fun"
    >"Python has more libraries"
    >
    >..etc etc
    >
    >I'm coming at this as someone who really likes the look of Ruby and I
    >guess I'm trying to find out if investing time in learning it (aside from
    >just what you gain from learning the language) is worth it in terms of
    >things you can actually do with it and how easily they can be done. I know
    >that's a little vague, but I meant it to be vague, mostly, minus the last
    >part.


    Deciding between the two seems to come down to preferences. If you don't
    prefer whitespace as syntax then you'll probably prefer Ruby. If you
    think that whitespace as syntax is the coolest thing since sliced bread
    then you'll probably prefer Python. But the whitespace issue is only the
    first one you'll encounter.

    I suggest you actually write some code in each language and then decide.
    A project that would take a day or two.
    Perhaps you could take a stab at one of the Ruby Quizes?


    >
    >> P.S. Your post is very generic and smells like a troll (I beg your
    >> pardon if it is not), so do not expect a lot of responces here, people
    >> are just tired.

    >
    >Understood. It's definitely not a troll, though. No offense take. I
    >understand how these things go (especially after Googling). If you reread
    >my last part of my post, that should tell you that I'm 100% serious about
    >hearing about how Ruby is being used out in the real world and what Ruby
    >developers think of its chances. By that I mean that any time one learns a
    >language there's obviously an investment in time if you want to get
    >something out of it. Since I don't know Python, nor Ruby, but have
    >leanings towards Ruby, my question was born out of sincere interest to
    >know what some of you thought its future held, in particular as a language
    >to develop desktop applications that need to be developed quickly. It
    >looks to me like both Python and Ruby have a bright future, not just as
    >web languages, but also in the afforementioned capacity, as languages to
    >do RAD work where you don't want to use VB or you want to move away from
    >VB or VC++. That's my primary interest and thus the reason I asked what
    >you all thought of its future in that regard.


    One can only speculate about the future. Ruby's future does seem bright
    at this point, but I'd still hesitate to make predicitons. The future
    depends a lot on what new things Ruby-newbies will do with the language
    as they master it.

    Phil
     
    Phil Tomson, Jan 23, 2005
    #17
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