recommend aural browser?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Leslie, Nov 25, 2003.

  1. Leslie

    Leslie Guest

    Can anyone recommend a good aural browser that's available for free
    download and will work under Windows XP Pro?

    Thanks,

    Leslie
    Leslie, Nov 25, 2003
    #1
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  2. Leslie

    Chris Morris Guest

    Leslie <> writes:
    > Can anyone recommend a good aural browser that's available for free
    > download and will work under Windows XP Pro?


    IBM Home Page Reader has 30 day trial download. That should be enough
    for you to use it, test sites in, learn what it's like and how you
    need to adjust your style to make things easier for speech browser
    users.

    --
    Chris
    Chris Morris, Nov 25, 2003
    #2
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  3. Leslie

    Leslie Guest

    On 25 Nov 2003 17:32:37 +0000, Chris Morris <>
    wrote:

    >Leslie <> writes:
    >> Can anyone recommend a good aural browser that's available for free
    >> download and will work under Windows XP Pro?

    >
    >IBM Home Page Reader has 30 day trial download. That should be enough
    >for you to use it, test sites in, learn what it's like and how you
    >need to adjust your style to make things easier for speech browser
    >users.


    I'll d/l the trial version this weekend, but I'd still like to know if
    there is a free aural browser that won't time out in 30 days - and
    will work under XP Pro.

    Thanks!


    "I refuse to have a battle of wits with an unarmed person."
    Leslie, Nov 26, 2003
    #3
  4. Leslie

    Leslie Guest

    On 25 Nov 2003 17:32:37 +0000, Chris Morris <>
    wrote:

    >Leslie <> writes:
    >> Can anyone recommend a good aural browser that's available for free
    >> download and will work under Windows XP Pro?

    >
    >IBM Home Page Reader has 30 day trial download. That should be enough
    >for you to use it, test sites in, learn what it's like and how you
    >need to adjust your style to make things easier for speech browser
    >users.


    I've d/l and installed IBM HPR and have spent the past hour or so
    listening to some of my web pages. What an education!

    I'd like the opinions on what users of aural browsers find is the best
    layout. Most of my pages have navigation links on the left with the
    main body of the page on the right, and then nav links again at the
    bottom of the page. This seem pretty straightforward to me, but then
    I can see what it is the browser is reading to me.

    In addition to making my pages conform to current accessibility "laws"
    and any new ones that will come down the pike in the future I'd also
    like to make sure that they are laid out so that they make sense to
    anyone who can only hear them.

    Comments??

    Thanks,

    Leslie
    "I refuse to have a battle of wits with an unarmed person."
    Leslie, Nov 27, 2003
    #4
  5. Leslie

    Trusylver Guest

    "Leslie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 25 Nov 2003 17:32:37 +0000, Chris Morris <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Leslie <> writes:
    > >> Can anyone recommend a good aural browser that's available for free
    > >> download and will work under Windows XP Pro?

    > >
    > >IBM Home Page Reader has 30 day trial download. That should be enough
    > >for you to use it, test sites in, learn what it's like and how you
    > >need to adjust your style to make things easier for speech browser
    > >users.

    >
    > I'll d/l the trial version this weekend, but I'd still like to know if
    > there is a free aural browser that won't time out in 30 days - and
    > will work under XP Pro.
    >

    I use Multiweb to test my pages it is a free browser developed by Deakin
    University
    with government funding.

    http://www.deakin.edu.au/infosys/multiweb/default.htm


    Cheers
    Trusylver
    Trusylver, Nov 27, 2003
    #5
  6. Leslie

    Spartanicus Guest

    Leslie wrote:

    >In addition to making my pages conform to current accessibility "laws"
    >and any new ones that will come down the pike in the future I'd also
    >like to make sure that they are laid out so that they make sense to
    >anyone who can only hear them.


    Switch your monitor off.

    --
    Spartanicus
    Spartanicus, Nov 27, 2003
    #6
  7. Leslie

    Nico Schuyt Guest

    Nico Schuyt, Nov 27, 2003
    #7
  8. Leslie

    Trusylver Guest

    "Nico Schuyt" <> wrote in message
    news:3fc5b1eb$0$13865$...
    > Trusylver wrote:
    > > I use Multiweb to test my pages it is a free browser developed by
    > > Deakin University
    > > with government funding.
    > > http://www.deakin.edu.au/infosys/multiweb/default.htm

    >
    > What is the advantage above Lynx?
    > Nico
    >
    >


    It is an aural browser which is what the OP was asking about

    I test in Lynx as well but to realy know what it is like for
    a blind person to surf your page it is helpfull to close your eyes or
    turn off your monitor.
    Trusylver, Nov 28, 2003
    #8
  9. Leslie

    Leslie Guest

    On Fri, 28 Nov 2003 00:42:05 GMT, "Trusylver"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Nico Schuyt" <> wrote in message
    >news:3fc5b1eb$0$13865$...
    >> Trusylver wrote:
    >> > I use Multiweb to test my pages it is a free browser developed by
    >> > Deakin University
    >> > with government funding.
    >> > http://www.deakin.edu.au/infosys/multiweb/default.htm

    >>
    >> What is the advantage above Lynx?
    >> Nico
    >>
    >>

    >
    >It is an aural browser which is what the OP was asking about
    >
    >I test in Lynx as well but to realy know what it is like for
    >a blind person to surf your page it is helpfull to close your eyes or
    >turn off your monitor.


    When I first listened to my pages I did turn my back to the computer,
    and to be honest, found it all to be very confusing. I did learn that
    my alt tags should be more precise, but since I know these pages like
    the back of my hand I could easily visualize where the reader was on
    the page.

    I'd truly like the opinions of those with no or low vision on what
    makes a page easy to understand and navigate. I suppose if I was more
    adept at using an aural browser (and the keyboard commands to stop the
    speech and move around) I wouldn't find it all so confusing.

    I hope I never have the need to use an aural browser, but I'd like to
    know that pages I write are easy to use, navigate and are enjoyable
    for those with little or no vision.

    Leslie
    "I refuse to have a battle of wits with an unarmed person."
    Leslie, Nov 28, 2003
    #9
  10. Leslie

    Nico Schuyt Guest

    Trusylver wrote:
    > "Nico Schuyt" wrote in message
    >> Trusylver wrote:


    >>> I use Multiweb to test my pages it is a free browser developed by
    >>> Deakin University
    >>> with government funding.
    >>> http://www.deakin.edu.au/infosys/multiweb/default.htm


    >> What is the advantage above Lynx?


    > It is an aural browser which is what the OP was asking about
    > I test in Lynx as well but to realy know what it is like for
    > a blind person to surf your page it is helpfull to close your eyes or
    > turn off your monitor.


    Ahh, I thought it was a text only browser. Interesting! I'll try it
    tomorrow.
    Thanks, Nico
    Nico Schuyt, Nov 28, 2003
    #10
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