Should I learn C++?

Discussion in 'C++' started by Scott Sellers, Apr 12, 2007.

  1. Hi,

    I am a Junior Software Engineer who currently works programming in
    Delphi. I have been working with Delphi for around 12mths but I am
    interested in learning C++.

    The reason for this interest is that I noticed that alot of
    universities have started to teach C++ as their core language and I am
    beginning to think that its time now to widen my range of programming
    languages/skills. When I was at university I personally learned Java
    and Delphi as part of my studies but following my graduation I focused
    on using Delphi (which for the most part as been quite simple) as I
    enjoy developing and working with Windows Apps.

    I am not sure if I should learn C++, I know that it would be a useful
    skill but I was wondering if it would affect my work with Delphi. I
    also don't know where I should start with learning C++ (if at all), do
    I start with the very basics or would my previous experience help me
    in developing this new skill.

    I am sorry if this is not a good question for this forum but I have
    used Google groups in the past and found it very helpful.

    Thanks

    Scott
    Scott Sellers, Apr 12, 2007
    #1
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  2. Scott Sellers

    Greg Comeau Guest

    In article <>,
    Scott Sellers <> wrote:
    >I am a Junior Software Engineer who currently works programming in
    >Delphi. I have been working with Delphi for around 12mths but I am
    >interested in learning C++.
    >
    >The reason for this interest is that I noticed that alot of
    >universities have started to teach C++ as their core language and I am
    >beginning to think that its time now to widen my range of programming
    >languages/skills. When I was at university I personally learned Java
    >and Delphi as part of my studies but following my graduation I focused
    >on using Delphi (which for the most part as been quite simple) as I
    >enjoy developing and working with Windows Apps.
    >
    >I am not sure if I should learn C++, I know that it would be a useful
    >skill but I was wondering if it would affect my work with Delphi. I
    >also don't know where I should start with learning C++ (if at all), do
    >I start with the very basics or would my previous experience help me
    >in developing this new skill.
    >
    >I am sorry if this is not a good question for this forum but I have
    >used Google groups in the past and found it very helpful.


    It's hard to say, but 12 months is not a vast amount of experience
    so it may not hurt for you to start from the very basics. And if
    you find you know some of the basics, then use it as a review.
    Often thought the mindset and focused and goals of different
    languages establish different and new basics, so I doubt you'll
    be in much dillemma. But keep an open mind, since Delphi ways
    are not necessarily C++ ways, and so on.
    --
    Greg Comeau / 4.3.9 with C++0xisms now in beta!
    Comeau C/C++ ONLINE ==> http://www.comeaucomputing.com/tryitout
    World Class Compilers: Breathtaking C++, Amazing C99, Fabulous C90.
    Comeau C/C++ with Dinkumware's Libraries... Have you tried it?
    Greg Comeau, Apr 12, 2007
    #2
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  3. Scott Sellers wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am a Junior Software Engineer who currently works programming in
    > Delphi. I have been working with Delphi for around 12mths but I am
    > interested in learning C++.
    >
    > The reason for this interest is that I noticed that alot of
    > universities have started to teach C++ as their core language and I am
    > beginning to think that its time now to widen my range of programming
    > languages/skills. When I was at university I personally learned Java
    > and Delphi as part of my studies but following my graduation I focused
    > on using Delphi (which for the most part as been quite simple) as I
    > enjoy developing and working with Windows Apps.
    >
    > I am not sure if I should learn C++, I know that it would be a useful
    > skill but I was wondering if it would affect my work with Delphi. I
    > also don't know where I should start with learning C++ (if at all), do
    > I start with the very basics or would my previous experience help me
    > in developing this new skill.



    Yes, you should learn C++.

    The best way to learn a language is by using it. Pick a small project,
    say a small utility text file manipulation tool that gets you to
    exercise the language. Say a file sorting tool that reads in strings of
    various types (ints, floats, strings) and then you can pick a way to
    sort these.
    Gianni Mariani, Apr 12, 2007
    #3
  4. Scott Sellers wrote:
    > The reason for this interest is that I noticed that alot of
    > universities have started to teach C++ as their core language and I am
    > beginning to think that its time now to widen my range of programming
    > languages/skills.


    If you want a broad range of useful programming skills, then C++ is a
    must to learn, along with Java, Ruby, Lisp, Assembler, and D.
    Walter Bright, Apr 13, 2007
    #4
  5. Scott Sellers

    GeekBoy Guest

    "Scott Sellers" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am a Junior Software Engineer who currently works programming in
    > Delphi. I have been working with Delphi for around 12mths but I am
    > interested in learning C++.
    >
    > The reason for this interest is that I noticed that alot of
    > universities have started to teach C++ as their core language and I am


    No, they have been for many years.

    > beginning to think that its time now to widen my range of programming
    > languages/skills. When I was at university I personally learned Java


    Which is based on C++

    > and Delphi as part of my studies but following my graduation I focused
    > on using Delphi (which for the most part as been quite simple) as I
    > enjoy developing and working with Windows Apps.
    >
    > I am not sure if I should learn C++, I know that it would be a useful
    > skill but I was wondering if it would affect my work with Delphi. I
    > also don't know where I should start with learning C++ (if at all), do
    > I start with the very basics or would my previous experience help me
    > in developing this new skill.
    >
    > I am sorry if this is not a good question for this forum but I have
    > used Google groups in the past and found it very helpful.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Scott
    >
    GeekBoy, Apr 13, 2007
    #5
  6. Scott Sellers

    Guest

    On Apr 12, 9:21 pm, Walter Bright <>
    wrote:
    > Scott Sellers wrote:
    > > The reason for this interest is that I noticed that alot of
    > > universities have started to teach C++ as their core language and I am
    > > beginning to think that its time now to widen my range of programming
    > > languages/skills.

    >
    > If you want a broad range of useful programming skills, then C++ is a
    > must to learn, along with Java, Ruby, Lisp, Assembler, and D.


    How much would one's range be broadened by learning D after learning C+
    + and Java?
    , Apr 13, 2007
    #6
  7. "Scott Sellers" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > The reason for this interest is that I noticed that alot of
    > universities have started to teach C++ as their core language and I am
    > beginning to think that its time now to widen my range of programming
    > languages/skills. When I was at university I personally learned Java
    > and Delphi as part of my studies but following my graduation I focused
    > on using Delphi (which for the most part as been quite simple) as I
    > enjoy developing and working with Windows Apps.



    <sarcasm> Universities teach C++?!!
    The two universites I attended only forced me to use some kind of hybrid C
    and deprecated C++ mix that they called C++ and alot of bad programming
    practices. They also shoved Linux down my throat and forced me to pretend to
    hate Microsoft. There wasn't much teaching involved.
    Christopher Pisz, Apr 13, 2007
    #7
  8. * Christopher Pisz:
    > There wasn't much teaching involved.


    Well, maybe you haven't *learned* anything.... ;)

    --
    Martijn van Buul -
    Martijn van Buul, Apr 13, 2007
    #8
  9. Martijn van Buul wrote:
    > * Christopher Pisz:
    >> There wasn't much teaching involved.

    >
    > Well, maybe you haven't *learned* anything.... ;)


    Most likely nothing of what they weren't teaching, but
    certainly something else, probably. :)
    Victor Bazarov, Apr 13, 2007
    #9
  10. Christopher Pisz wrote:
    ....
    > <sarcasm> Universities teach C++?!!
    > The two universites I attended only forced me to use some kind of hybrid C
    > and deprecated C++ mix that they called C++ and alot of bad programming
    > practices. They also shoved Linux down my throat and forced me to pretend to
    > hate Microsoft. ...


    And what's the problem ?

    :)
    Gianni Mariani, Apr 13, 2007
    #10
  11. wrote:
    > On Apr 12, 9:21 pm, Walter Bright <>
    > wrote:
    >> If you want a broad range of useful programming skills, then C++ is a
    >> must to learn, along with Java, Ruby, Lisp, Assembler, and D.

    >
    > How much would one's range be broadened by learning D after learning C+
    > + and Java?


    In D you can do advanced things with much less effort than in C++.
    Walter Bright, Apr 13, 2007
    #11
  12. Walter Bright wrote:
    > wrote:
    >> On Apr 12, 9:21 pm, Walter Bright <>
    >> wrote:
    >>> If you want a broad range of useful programming skills, then C++ is
    >>> a must to learn, along with Java, Ruby, Lisp, Assembler, and D.

    >>
    >> How much would one's range be broadened by learning D after learning
    >> C+ + and Java?

    >
    > In D you can do advanced things with much less effort than in C++.


    I think that just confirms the point. If it's easier, what's the
    value of _learning_ it? Using it, I can understand. But learning?
    It's like learning to drive automatic after mastering stick shift.
    Victor Bazarov, Apr 13, 2007
    #12
  13. "Martijn van Buul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >* Christopher Pisz:
    >> There wasn't much teaching involved.

    >
    > Well, maybe you haven't *learned* anything.... ;)
    >
    > --
    > Martijn van Buul -


    I learned how to say," yes ma'm or yes sir... absolutly right, we should all
    use iostream.h fstream.h stdlib.h etc, declare main to return void, never
    use the STL but rather implement our own buggy data structures, use char
    arrays instead of strings, use atoi and itoa instead of a stringstream,
    warnings are only displayed to entertain us, trunctation is a word we
    shouldn't really worry about, the more globals we have the better, VIM is
    the best tool to use when writing my code because it is extremely important
    that I dedicate hours to memorizing keystrokes instead of writing code, the
    debugger? that's something I'll learn later when I am on the job...my
    employer won't mind. Yes ma'am or sir, you've been doing this since i was
    still semen, so you are correct as usual. Oh and yes all republicans suck
    and we should all smoke pot, have gay marraiges, and it is my fault that
    women are sex objects because I have been beating them with a baseball bat
    since birth to dance for money. Absolutly...yes ma'am.
    Christopher Pisz, Apr 13, 2007
    #13
  14. Christopher Pisz wrote:
    > "Martijn van Buul" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>* Christopher Pisz:
    >>
    >>>There wasn't much teaching involved.

    >>
    >>Well, maybe you haven't *learned* anything.... ;)
    >>
    >>--
    >>Martijn van Buul -

    >
    >
    > I learned how to say," yes ma'm or yes sir... absolutly right, we should all
    > use iostream.h fstream.h stdlib.h etc, declare main to return void, never
    > use the STL but rather implement our own buggy data structures, use char
    > arrays instead of strings, use atoi and itoa instead of a stringstream,
    > warnings are only displayed to entertain us, trunctation is a word we
    > shouldn't really worry about, the more globals we have the better, VIM is
    > the best tool to use when writing my code because it is extremely important
    > that I dedicate hours to memorizing keystrokes instead of writing code, the
    > debugger? that's something I'll learn later when I am on the job...my
    > employer won't mind. Yes ma'am or sir, you've been doing this since i was
    > still semen, so you are correct as usual. Oh and yes all republicans suck
    > and we should all smoke pot, have gay marraiges, and it is my fault that
    > women are sex objects because I have been beating them with a baseball bat
    > since birth to dance for money. Absolutly...yes ma'am.


    You forgot the repentance for your repressed memories of using cobol in
    your previous incarnation.
    Gianni Mariani, Apr 13, 2007
    #14
  15. Scott Sellers

    Ian Collins Guest

    Victor Bazarov wrote:
    > Walter Bright wrote:
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Apr 12, 9:21 pm, Walter Bright <>
    >>>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>If you want a broad range of useful programming skills, then C++ is
    >>>>a must to learn, along with Java, Ruby, Lisp, Assembler, and D.
    >>>
    >>>How much would one's range be broadened by learning D after learning
    >>>C+ + and Java?

    >>
    >>In D you can do advanced things with much less effort than in C++.

    >
    >
    > I think that just confirms the point. If it's easier, what's the
    > value of _learning_ it? Using it, I can understand. But learning?
    > It's like learning to drive automatic after mastering stick shift.
    >

    It took me quite a while to stop using two feet!

    --
    Ian Collins.
    Ian Collins, Apr 14, 2007
    #15
  16. [my OT] Re: Should I learn C++?

    Ian Collins wrote:
    > Victor Bazarov wrote:
    >> Walter Bright wrote:
    >>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Apr 12, 9:21 pm, Walter Bright <>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> If you want a broad range of useful programming skills, then C++
    >>>>> is a must to learn, along with Java, Ruby, Lisp, Assembler, and D.
    >>>>
    >>>> How much would one's range be broadened by learning D after
    >>>> learning C+ + and Java?
    >>>
    >>> In D you can do advanced things with much less effort than in C++.

    >>
    >>
    >> I think that just confirms the point. If it's easier, what's the
    >> value of _learning_ it? Using it, I can understand. But learning?
    >> It's like learning to drive automatic after mastering stick shift.
    >>

    > It took me quite a while to stop using two feet!


    It's like speaking English to a colleague after a phone conversation
    [in Russian] with my wife - requires a mental effort to switch... So,
    did you broaden your horizon by learning to drive automatic?
    Victor Bazarov, Apr 14, 2007
    #16
  17. Scott Sellers

    Ian Collins Guest

    Re: [my OT] Re: Should I learn C++?

    Victor Bazarov wrote:
    > Ian Collins wrote:
    >
    >>Victor Bazarov wrote:
    >>
    >>>Walter Bright wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>On Apr 12, 9:21 pm, Walter Bright <>
    >>>>>wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>If you want a broad range of useful programming skills, then C++
    >>>>>>is a must to learn, along with Java, Ruby, Lisp, Assembler, and D.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>How much would one's range be broadened by learning D after
    >>>>>learning C+ + and Java?
    >>>>
    >>>>In D you can do advanced things with much less effort than in C++.
    >>>
    >>>I think that just confirms the point. If it's easier, what's the
    >>>value of _learning_ it? Using it, I can understand. But learning?
    >>>It's like learning to drive automatic after mastering stick shift.
    >>>

    >>
    >>It took me quite a while to stop using two feet!

    >
    > It's like speaking English to a colleague after a phone conversation
    > [in Russian] with my wife - requires a mental effort to switch... So,
    > did you broaden your horizon by learning to drive automatic?
    >

    Not realy, but it was a requirement for the environment (the US). When
    I returned to my normal environment, I kept forgetting the clutch and
    stalling. I'm sure there's an analogy buried in that somewhere!

    --
    Ian Collins.
    Ian Collins, Apr 14, 2007
    #17
  18. Scott Sellers

    Unknownmat Guest

    > The reason for this interest is that I noticed that alot of
    > universities have started to teach C++ as their core language and I am
    > beginning to think that its time now to widen my range of programming
    > languages/skills. When I was at university I personally learned Java
    > and Delphi as part of my studies but following my graduation I focused
    > on using Delphi (which for the most part as been quite simple) as I
    > enjoy developing and working with Windows Apps.
    >


    I would recommend against learning C++ if your stated goal is to
    broaden your horizons. From a language perspective C++ is quite
    similar to Java which you already know.

    I strongly recommend that you cast your net a bit further. In
    particular, I would recommend a LISP variant because it is so easy to
    write mini-languages within it. Haskell would be good because it is a
    purely functional, lazy language and learning its type system will be
    quite insightful. To round out the list, I also recommend at least
    understanding the basics of Prolog (the canonical logic-deduction
    language).

    Anyway, there are a ton of languages out there that represent widely
    disparate means of reasoning about programs. For a somewhat shallow
    overview of 6 or 7 that you ought to know (of which Java/C++ are
    conspicuously absent), please see: http://www.informit.com/articles/article.asp?p=704316&rl=1.
    I think there are huge advantages to be able to think in completely
    different paradigms (even if you stick with Java professionally), and
    in this regard C++ doesn't fall far enough from the Java tree (or vice
    versa, actually), for me to be able to recommend it to you.

    BTW, if you have not already read this, then I strongly recommend
    reading the book "Structure and Interpretation of Computer
    Programs" (which uses Scheme): http://mitpress.mit.edu/sicp/. This
    book is quite amazing. Talk about broadening your horizons.
    Unknownmat, Apr 14, 2007
    #18
  19. Scott Sellers

    Ian Collins Guest

    Unknownmat wrote:
    >>The reason for this interest is that I noticed that alot of
    >>universities have started to teach C++ as their core language and I am
    >>beginning to think that its time now to widen my range of programming
    >>languages/skills. When I was at university I personally learned Java
    >>and Delphi as part of my studies but following my graduation I focused
    >>on using Delphi (which for the most part as been quite simple) as I
    >>enjoy developing and working with Windows Apps.
    >>

    >
    >
    > I would recommend against learning C++ if your stated goal is to
    > broaden your horizons. From a language perspective C++ is quite
    > similar to Java which you already know.
    >

    My Ford is similar to my Landrover, but the latter gets me to way more
    interesting places.

    --
    Ian Collins.
    Ian Collins, Apr 14, 2007
    #19
  20. Victor Bazarov wrote:
    > Walter Bright wrote:
    >> wrote:
    >>> On Apr 12, 9:21 pm, Walter Bright <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>> If you want a broad range of useful programming skills, then C++ is
    >>>> a must to learn, along with Java, Ruby, Lisp, Assembler, and D.
    >>> How much would one's range be broadened by learning D after learning
    >>> C+ + and Java?

    >> In D you can do advanced things with much less effort than in C++.

    >
    > I think that just confirms the point. If it's easier, what's the
    > value of _learning_ it? Using it, I can understand. But learning?
    > It's like learning to drive automatic after mastering stick shift.


    You do learn to appreciate an auto after learning a stick <g>.
    Walter Bright, Apr 14, 2007
    #20
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