Sound Quality In Sound API

Discussion in 'Java' started by Luc The Perverse, Oct 30, 2005.

  1. I used a program once called ExactAudioCopy (from ExactAudioCopy.de) and
    used it to record my wedding march that a friend of mine who is a composer
    wrote and played on the piano.

    We initially tried using the windows sound recorder that comes prebundled
    with windows and it sounded absolutely aweful. For some reason, when we
    used EAC it sounded like a studio recording (it may have been the 60$
    microphone we used, but this doesn't excuse the windows app's horrible
    performance.)

    I didn't know you could screw up sound after it had already passed through
    the sound card, but appearantly not all recorders were created equal.

    When I make my app use sound I want to make sure that the recordings are as
    clear as possible. If I had to guess I would say that Microsoft Sound
    Recorder is just utter shit, and anything else should be acceptable. I was
    hoping someone with some experience in the issue could help me refute or
    justify that claim.

    --
    LTP

    :)
     
    Luc The Perverse, Oct 30, 2005
    #1
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  2. Luc The Perverse

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Sat, 29 Oct 2005 19:55:50 -0600, "Luc The Perverse"
    <> wrote, quoted or indirectly
    quoted someone who said :

    >We initially tried using the windows sound recorder that comes prebundled
    >with windows and it sounded absolutely aweful.


    When you record, the software needs to know the tradeoff you want
    between sound quality and compactness. Sounds like you chose one of
    the lower quality options, designed for telephone quality voice.

    Look in the properties. I'd expect you will see a choice of recording
    formats and/or frequencies 48KHz will sound better much better than
    8KHz because it takes 6 times as many samples a second and can thus
    capture higher frequencies better.

    MS generally bundles only toy software with its OS. You might look at
    a more serious tool like GoldWave.

    http://mindprod.com/jgloss/microphone.html

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Java custom programming, consulting and coaching.
     
    Roedy Green, Oct 30, 2005
    #2
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  3. Roedy Green wrote:

    > On Sat, 29 Oct 2005 19:55:50 -0600, "Luc The Perverse"
    > <> wrote, quoted or indirectly
    > quoted someone who said :
    >
    >>We initially tried using the windows sound recorder that comes prebundled
    >>with windows and it sounded absolutely aweful.


    (snip explanation)

    > MS generally bundles only toy software with its OS.


    The windows sound recorder works just fine.. My only
    complaint of it is that it has a tendency to encourage
    MS proprietary formats (selected as default for output,
    AFAIR).

    'Spend your money' on a better microphone, and spend a little
    time getting to understand the formats you are using and the
    effect of different 'bit rates'.

    Some sound formats are very huge (.WAV, .AU?), others are
    lossy (MP3, ..). For sounds that will be heavily remixed
    and edited, use the huge but non-lossy formats, but dump
    the final track to a more modest bit rate in one of the
    compressing/lossy formats.
     
    Andrew Thompson, Oct 31, 2005
    #3
  4. "Andrew Thompson" <> wrote in message
    news:hUf9f.5019$...
    > Roedy Green wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 29 Oct 2005 19:55:50 -0600, "Luc The Perverse"
    >> <> wrote, quoted or indirectly
    >> quoted someone who said :
    >>
    >>>We initially tried using the windows sound recorder that comes prebundled
    >>>with windows and it sounded absolutely aweful.

    >
    > (snip explanation)
    >
    >> MS generally bundles only toy software with its OS.

    >
    > The windows sound recorder works just fine.. My only
    > complaint of it is that it has a tendency to encourage
    > MS proprietary formats (selected as default for output,
    > AFAIR).


    I'm sorry I think you're wrong.

    We were using identical equipment and got a complete crap recording (going
    to uncompressed WAVE) from window's sound player - and got what sounded like
    a studio recording from the other application.

    It may be something as simple as controlling input levels, or something
    similar, but up till now, it seems more like magick.

    --
    LTP

    :)
     
    Luc The Perverse, Oct 31, 2005
    #4
  5. Luc The Perverse wrote:
    ...
    > I'm sorry I think you're wrong.


    You think I can't tell good sound quality?

    Your assertion that it was the 'same hardware' means little,
    as the default settings used by the two pieces of *software*
    might be quite different.

    What sample rate was the wav? What was the setting of the mic
    level in the mixer that controls the Windows media player?
    How big were the two files when you compared them for the same
    length of music recording?

    Until you can answer those questions, you are waving your hands
    about vaguely in the air, wasting our bandwidth.
     
    Andrew Thompson, Oct 31, 2005
    #5
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