Survey: What IDEs do people use?

Discussion in 'C++' started by Jonathan Turkanis, Jun 12, 2005.

  1. Hi All,

    I hope this is not too far off topic here, but I can't think off any place where
    it would be exactly on topic.

    I'd like to get some sense of how widely used certain IDEs are. I'm particularly
    interested to know how widely used are Borland C++BuilderX (on various operating
    systems) and Bloodshed Dev-CPP. I'd also like to know what C++ IDE people think
    is best for Linux.

    Obviously this is not a scientific survey -- I don't have the time or funding
    for that. But I'd like to get some rough idea of people's opinions.

    Your help would be greatly appreciated.

    Jonathan
    Jonathan Turkanis, Jun 12, 2005
    #1
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  2. Jonathan Turkanis wrote:
    > Hi All,
    >
    > I hope this is not too far off topic here, but I can't think off any place where
    > it would be exactly on topic.
    >
    > I'd like to get some sense of how widely used certain IDEs are. I'm particularly
    > interested to know how widely used are Borland C++BuilderX (on various operating
    > systems) and Bloodshed Dev-CPP. I'd also like to know what C++ IDE people think
    > is best for Linux.
    >
    > Obviously this is not a scientific survey -- I don't have the time or funding
    > for that. But I'd like to get some rough idea of people's opinions.
    >
    > Your help would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Jonathan
    >
    >


    IF you are looking for a GUI IDE with integrated debugger support,
    there are several, but Anjuta (for gnome) and KDevelop (for
    KDE, gnome, and several others) are the 2 most often used.
    KDevelop in particular is similar to the MS-Visual* IDE's
    found on Windows - similar as far as the IDE's GUI style is
    concerned.

    I haven't used Anjuta in about 2 years, so I can't speak to
    its latest features, but I use KDevelop a lot.

    Many Linux distros include one, or both, of these IDE's.

    Below are the links. Both sites include screenshots
    (at the top for Anjuta, and in the left-hand menu-pane
    for KDevelop), docs, etc.

    http://www.kdevelop.org/

    http://anjuta.sourceforge.net/

    Regards,
    Larry


    Regards,
    Larry
    Larry I Smith, Jun 12, 2005
    #2
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  3. Jonathan Turkanis

    John Carson Guest

    "Jonathan Turkanis" <> wrote in message
    news:
    > Hi All,
    >
    > I hope this is not too far off topic here, but I can't think off any
    > place where it would be exactly on topic.
    >
    > I'd like to get some sense of how widely used certain IDEs are. I'm
    > particularly interested to know how widely used are Borland
    > C++BuilderX (on various operating systems) and Bloodshed Dev-CPP. I'd
    > also like to know what C++ IDE people think is best for Linux.
    >
    > Obviously this is not a scientific survey -- I don't have the time or
    > funding for that. But I'd like to get some rough idea of people's
    > opinions.
    >
    > Your help would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Jonathan



    VC++. I have never seriously used anything else. I use VC++ because:

    1. It is pretty good.
    2. I figure that Microsoft is successful partly because its knowledge of the
    OS gives it the inside track in other development areas. Using Microsoft's
    compiler/IDE/documentation is the closest someone outside Microsoft can get
    to an inside track.

    --
    John Carson
    John Carson, Jun 12, 2005
    #3
  4. Jonathan Turkanis

    ben Guest

    Eclipse with CDT sounds like a nice choice!

    ben

    "Jonathan Turkanis" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > I hope this is not too far off topic here, but I can't think off any place

    where
    > it would be exactly on topic.
    >
    > I'd like to get some sense of how widely used certain IDEs are. I'm

    particularly
    > interested to know how widely used are Borland C++BuilderX (on various

    operating
    > systems) and Bloodshed Dev-CPP. I'd also like to know what C++ IDE people

    think
    > is best for Linux.
    >
    > Obviously this is not a scientific survey -- I don't have the time or

    funding
    > for that. But I'd like to get some rough idea of people's opinions.
    >
    > Your help would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Jonathan
    >
    >
    ben, Jun 12, 2005
    #4
  5. "Jonathan Turkanis" <> writes:

    > Hi All,
    >
    > I hope this is not too far off topic here, but I can't think off any place where
    > it would be exactly on topic.
    >
    > I'd like to get some sense of how widely used certain IDEs are. I'm particularly
    > interested to know how widely used are Borland C++BuilderX (on various operating
    > systems) and Bloodshed Dev-CPP. I'd also like to know what C++ IDE people think
    > is best for Linux.



    gcc + gdb + emacs + man



    --
    espen
    Espen Myrland, Jun 12, 2005
    #5
  6. Jonathan Turkanis

    Dan Elliott Guest

    Espen Myrland wrote:
    > "Jonathan Turkanis" <> writes:
    >
    >
    >>Hi All,
    >>
    >>I hope this is not too far off topic here, but I can't think off any place where
    >>it would be exactly on topic.
    >>
    >>I'd like to get some sense of how widely used certain IDEs are. I'm particularly
    >>interested to know how widely used are Borland C++BuilderX (on various operating
    >>systems) and Bloodshed Dev-CPP. I'd also like to know what C++ IDE people think
    >>is best for Linux.

    >
    >
    >
    > gcc + gdb + emacs + man
    >
    >
    >


    SECOND!
    Dan Elliott, Jun 12, 2005
    #6
  7. Hi,

    KDevelop on Linux.
    VC++ on Windows, but only if I have to.

    Fabio
    Fabio Fracassi, Jun 12, 2005
    #7
  8. Jonathan Turkanis wrote:

    > Hi All,
    >
    > I hope this is not too far off topic here, but I can't think off any place
    > where it would be exactly on topic.
    >
    > I'd like to get some sense of how widely used certain IDEs are. I'm
    > particularly interested to know how widely used are Borland C++BuilderX
    > (on various operating systems) and Bloodshed Dev-CPP. I'd also like to
    > know what C++ IDE people think is best for Linux.
    >
    > Obviously this is not a scientific survey -- I don't have the time or
    > funding for that. But I'd like to get some rough idea of people's
    > opinions.
    >
    > Your help would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Jonathan


    I have a lot of hope for the future of KDevelop, but right now, it doesn't
    behave in a way that enhances my personal development preferences. It also
    has a serious problem talking to my SVN server, and does not yet integrate
    well with QT4-rc1, so for now I use Emacs, bash, qmake (and/or autotools),
    svn commandline and gdb(I'm just learning). I'm beginning to view the
    Unix-like environment as an IDE. Not quite in the sense of those provided
    by Borland, Eclipse, VC++, etc., but once the tools are understood, the
    collection provides almost the same convenience as a more unified IDE, with
    far more flexibility.

    I've been spending a good bit of time studying the code base for KDevelop,
    and hope to contribute to it in the future. It proved very useful to me in
    the firest weeks working with C++ because it set up my header, and
    implementation files in a way that worked, and also set up the build
    environment. I was then able to examine what it produced in order to learn
    how it was done.

    The highmark in IDEs I have used is Borland's JBuilder. I know it's not
    C++, but after using JBuilder, I can see the limitations in any of the C++
    IDEs I looked at. I downloaded VC++ 2005 beta, and was willing to provide
    feedback, but it's so broken as to be unusable.
    --
    If our hypothesis is about anything and not about some one or more
    particular things, then our deductions constitute mathematics. Thus
    mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we
    are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true.-Bertrand Russell
    Steven T. Hatton, Jun 12, 2005
    #8
  9. John Carson wrote:

    > VC++. I have never seriously used anything else. I use VC++ because:
    >
    > 1. It is pretty good.
    > 2. I figure that Microsoft is successful partly because its knowledge of
    > the OS gives it the inside track in other development areas. Using
    > Microsoft's compiler/IDE/documentation is the closest someone outside
    > Microsoft can get to an inside track.
    >


    Oh, but, but, but...Oh, nevermind.
    --
    If our hypothesis is about anything and not about some one or more
    particular things, then our deductions constitute mathematics. Thus
    mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we
    are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true.-Bertrand Russell
    Steven T. Hatton, Jun 12, 2005
    #9
  10. On Sun, 12 Jun 2005 13:36:34 -0400, "Steven T. Hatton"
    <> wrote:

    >The highmark in IDEs I have used is Borland's JBuilder. I know it's not
    >C++, but after using JBuilder, I can see the limitations in any of the C++
    >IDEs I looked at. I downloaded VC++ 2005 beta, and was willing to provide
    >feedback, but it's so broken as to be unusable.


    You know that Borland is dropping JBuilder and moving to Eclipse now?

    Go to: http://tinyurl.com/dodlt and search in the current page for
    "Eclipse".

    --
    Bob Hairgrove
    Bob Hairgrove, Jun 12, 2005
    #10
  11. Bob Hairgrove wrote:

    > On Sun, 12 Jun 2005 13:36:34 -0400, "Steven T. Hatton"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>The highmark in IDEs I have used is Borland's JBuilder. I know it's not
    >>C++, but after using JBuilder, I can see the limitations in any of the C++
    >>IDEs I looked at. I downloaded VC++ 2005 beta, and was willing to provide
    >>feedback, but it's so broken as to be unusable.

    >
    > You know that Borland is dropping JBuilder and moving to Eclipse now?
    >
    > Go to: http://tinyurl.com/dodlt and search in the current page for
    > "Eclipse".
    >
    > --
    > Bob Hairgrove
    >


    That's a shame. I like JBuilder far more than I like Eclipse. I believe
    part of the problem Borland is facing is that Java is designed in such a
    way to make it relatively easy to provide many of the features that used to
    distinguish JBuilder from other tools. But I haven't done any Java coding
    in over a year, so I'm a bit out of the loop on the current state of
    affairs.
    --
    If our hypothesis is about anything and not about some one or more
    particular things, then our deductions constitute mathematics. Thus
    mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we
    are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true.-Bertrand Russell
    Steven T. Hatton, Jun 12, 2005
    #11
  12. > I'd like to get some sense of how widely used certain IDEs are.

    I have been an Emacs user, if not exactly an enthusiast, for 15 years or
    so. Last week I "upgraded" my Debian Linux box and the Emacs
    installation has been somewhat trashed. So I thought to myself, what
    better opportunity to look at some of the more 21st-century IDEs.

    Yesterday I installed KDevelop (version 3.2, from the Debian packages).
    It looks OK; there's obviously a learning curve, but something that is
    too quick to learn may turn out to be superficial in the long term. I
    was not unimpressed and imported one of my current projects. It seems
    happy to let me write my own Makefiles and doesn't "get in the way" of
    the underlying tools.

    BUT... then it crashed. I clicked OK on a preferences dialog and boom,
    the window was gone. That's not acceptable; Emacs has never done that
    to me.

    So I'm not sure what to do next. Maybe this thread will throw up some
    ideas.

    --Phil.
    Phil Endecott, Jun 12, 2005
    #12
  13. Jonathan Turkanis

    Starx Guest

    I use Visual C++ on windows. Mostly because I don't want to deal with
    the full beast that is MFC programming. Programming is only a hobby
    for me so I'd rather use the wizards.
    Starx, Jun 13, 2005
    #13
  14. Jonathan Turkanis

    KeithSpook Guest


    > BUT... then it crashed. I clicked OK on a preferences dialog and boom,
    > the window was gone. That's not acceptable; Emacs has never done that
    > to me.
    >
    > So I'm not sure what to do next. Maybe this thread will throw up some
    > ideas.
    >


    Yeah, I poked around with the linux IDE's and none of the ones I tested
    were even close to emacs in terms of functionality or stability.
    Anjuta and MonoDevelop are close, I guess. But I still stick with
    emacs, or XEmacs on some platforms. VIM if I need it.

    I use XCode on OS.X.
    KeithSpook, Jun 14, 2005
    #14
  15. Jonathan Turkanis

    Rob Guest

    I am waiting for JetBrains (makers of IntelliJ) to do something for the
    c++ community. After using IntelliJ for years is has been very
    disappointing to have to use VS.
    Rob, Jun 15, 2005
    #15
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