Today's poem

Discussion in 'C++' started by Alf P. Steinbach, Aug 16, 2009.

  1. Shamelessly stolen, rerarranged & fused, from Norwegian Hamsun & Danish Hein:

    you can easily forgive a better superior,
    and you do
    but you can never forgive an equal or inferior
    who is, somehow, better than you


    Cheers,

    - Alf

    PS: Oh, C++ content, I forgot, but, anyway.
    Alf P. Steinbach, Aug 16, 2009
    #1
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  2. Alf P. Steinbach

    osmium Guest

    OT: Re: Today's poem

    "Alf P. Steinbach" wrote:

    > Shamelessly stolen, rerarranged & fused, from Norwegian Hamsun & Danish
    > Hein:
    >
    > you can easily forgive a better superior,
    > and you do
    > but you can never forgive an equal or inferior
    > who is, somehow, better than you


    I listen to, and like, a lot of Danish vocal singing and I get the
    impression, just from listening, that there is much less vowel usage in
    Danish compared to other European languages. It sounds like you really
    have to work at it to get it to come out right. Is it possible I am right?
    osmium, Aug 16, 2009
    #2
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  3. Alf P. Steinbach

    Jorgen Grahn Guest

    Re: OT: Re: Today's poem

    On Sun, 16 Aug 2009 10:29:52 -0500, osmium <> wrote:
    > "Alf P. Steinbach" wrote:
    >
    >> Shamelessly stolen, rerarranged & fused, from Norwegian Hamsun & Danish
    >> Hein:
    >>
    >> you can easily forgive a better superior,
    >> and you do
    >> but you can never forgive an equal or inferior
    >> who is, somehow, better than you

    >
    > I listen to, and like, a lot of Danish vocal singing and I get the
    > impression, just from listening, that there is much less vowel usage in
    > Danish compared to other European languages. It sounds like you really
    > have to work at it to get it to come out right. Is it possible I am right?


    1) Alf appears to be norwegian, so he probably speaks one of those
    languages rather than Danish
    2) Swedes like to think that spoken Danish is like speaking with one's
    mouth full of hot potatoes ... I guess that translates to *more* vowels
    than Swedish

    (No disrepect intended, of course. I hear they design good programming
    languages.)

    /Jorgen

    --
    // Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
    \X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
    Jorgen Grahn, Aug 20, 2009
    #3
  4. Alf P. Steinbach

    James Kanze Guest

    Re: OT: Re: Today's poem

    On Aug 20, 8:55 pm, Jorgen Grahn <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 16 Aug 2009 10:29:52 -0500, osmium <> wrote:
    > > "Alf P. Steinbach" wrote:


    > >> Shamelessly stolen, rerarranged & fused, from Norwegian
    > >> Hamsun & Danish Hein:


    > >> you can easily forgive a better superior,
    > >> and you do
    > >> but you can never forgive an equal or inferior
    > >> who is, somehow, better than you


    > > I listen to, and like, a lot of Danish vocal singing and I
    > > get the impression, just from listening, that there is much
    > > less vowel usage in Danish compared to other European
    > > languages. It sounds like you really have to work at it to
    > > get it to come out right. Is it possible I am right?


    I doubt it. I suspect that most of the Germanic languages
    (including English) are fairly similar in this respect.

    > 1) Alf appears to be norwegian, so he probably speaks one of those
    > languages rather than Danish


    Ah, but which one? Norway has two legal written languages, and
    from what I understand, neither corresponds exactly to how the
    language is spoken (which, like most languages, varies from
    place to place as well). And if I'm not mistaken, Norway's
    greatest author (Ibsen) wrote in Danish (although I think the
    differences between Danish and Bokmål are fairly small).

    > 2) Swedes like to think that spoken Danish is like speaking
    > with one's mouth full of hot potatoes ... I guess that
    > translates to *more* vowels than Swedish


    I think it translates to the fact that the tonal accent in
    Swedish is replaced by a gotteral stop in Danish.

    > (No disrepect intended, of course. I hear they design good
    > programming languages.)


    I've sometimes wondered if there isn't some sort of relationship
    between national (or regional) culture and a orientation in
    computer science. Scandinavians have, on the whole, played a
    remarkable role in object oriented software, from Dahl and
    Nygaard on. The two major "inventors" of template
    meta-programming in C++ (David Vandevoorde and Todd Veldhuizen)
    are both Belgians, and Germans (Dietmar Külh, Angelika Langer,
    etc.) seem to dominate among the experts in iostreams. On the
    other hand, some coincidences are to be expected. I have a
    hard time finding a common theme for the three languages
    invented by Frenchmen: Eiffel, Ada and Prolog. And the
    relationship between Stroustrup and OO can be explained by the
    fact that Nygaard was one of his profs at the University of
    Aarhus; the Scandinavian connection is probably more one of
    direct contact than of any inborn or cultural orientation.

    --
    James Kanze (GABI Software) email:
    Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
    Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
    9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
    James Kanze, Aug 21, 2009
    #4
  5. Alf P. Steinbach

    Daveed Guest

    Re: OT: Re: Today's poem

    On Aug 21, 4:10 am, James Kanze <> wrote:
    [...]
    > The two major "inventors" of template
    > meta-programming in C++ (David Vandevoorde and Todd Veldhuizen)
    > are both Belgians,


    While "Veldhuizen" is a very Belgian name, Todd is actually Canadian :-
    P

    > and Germans (Dietmar Külh, Angelika Langer,
    > etc.) seem to dominate among the experts in iostreams.  On the
    > other hand, some coincidences are to be expected.  I have a
    > hard time finding a common theme for the three languages
    > invented by Frenchmen: Eiffel, Ada and Prolog.


    I think there is a certain blend of rigor and pragmatism in all three
    languages that is perhaps a reflection of the French academic culture?

    Daveed
    Daveed, Aug 25, 2009
    #5
  6. Alf P. Steinbach

    James Kanze Guest

    Re: OT: Re: Today's poem

    On Aug 25, 3:49 am, Daveed <> wrote:
    > On Aug 21, 4:10 am, James Kanze <> wrote:
    > [...]


    > > The two major "inventors" of template meta-programming in
    > > C++ (David Vandevoorde and Todd Veldhuizen) are both
    > > Belgians,


    > While "Veldhuizen" is a very Belgian name, Todd is actually
    > Canadian :- P


    I don't know what made me thing he was Belgian---the name could
    also just as easily been Dutch, but for some reason, I was sure
    he was Belgian. I know he is currently based in Canada, but
    then, you're currently based in the U.S.

    > > and Germans (Dietmar Külh, Angelika Langer, etc.) seem to
    > > dominate among the experts in iostreams. On the other hand,
    > > some coincidences are to be expected. I have a hard time
    > > finding a common theme for the three languages invented by
    > > Frenchmen: Eiffel, Ada and Prolog.


    > I think there is a certain blend of rigor and pragmatism in
    > all three languages that is perhaps a reflection of the French
    > academic culture?


    Maybe. Or perhaps, at least in the case of Eiffel and Prolog,
    the tradition of being stubornly different:). ("L'exception
    culturelle".)

    --
    James Kanze (GABI Software) email:
    Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
    Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
    9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
    James Kanze, Aug 25, 2009
    #6
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