What is the score with XML

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Titus A Ducksass - AKA broken-record, Dec 30, 2004.

  1. Apart from it being a long winded way of setting up and categorising
    data what is the point?

    I know there must be a reasonable reason for it.

    <A message to top posters. Type your reply here>

    --
    Never be afraid to try something new. Remember that a lone amateur
    built the Ark. A large group of professionals built the Titanic.
    Titus A Ducksass - AKA broken-record, Dec 30, 2004
    #1
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  2. In article <>,
    says...
    > Apart from it being a long winded way of setting up and categorising
    > data what is the point?
    >
    > I know there must be a reasonable reason for it.


    It's portable. Supposing you are writing a novel - save it as XML then
    you can easily re-task the same data for print, web, PDA, whatever
    output you want.

    --
    Hywel http://kibo.org.uk/
    I do not eat quiche.
    Hywel Jenkins, Dec 30, 2004
    #2
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  3. On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 19:54:38 -0000, Hywel Jenkins
    <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > says...
    >> Apart from it being a long winded way of setting up and categorising
    >> data what is the point?
    >>
    >> I know there must be a reasonable reason for it.

    >
    >It's portable. Supposing you are writing a novel - save it as XML then
    >you can easily re-task the same data for print, web, PDA, whatever
    >output you want.


    ? Now I am more confused.
    How can it be used for a novel?
    <Chapter> ahsfblksdjhfsaj </Chapter
    ....

    I can slightly understand it for data but am confused wholesale.
    Is there anything that describes what/why in lay men's terms...

    <A message to top posters. Type your reply here>

    --
    Never be afraid to try something new. Remember that a lone amateur
    built the Ark. A large group of professionals built the Titanic.
    Titus A Ducksass - AKA broken-record, Dec 30, 2004
    #3
  4. Titus A Ducksass - AKA broken-record

    Oli Filth Guest

    Titus A Ducksass - AKA broken-record wrote:
    > On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 19:54:38 -0000, Hywel Jenkins
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>In article <>,
    >> says...
    >>
    >>>Apart from it being a long winded way of setting up and categorising
    >>>data what is the point?
    >>>
    >>>I know there must be a reasonable reason for it.

    >>
    >>It's portable. Supposing you are writing a novel - save it as XML then
    >>you can easily re-task the same data for print, web, PDA, whatever
    >>output you want.

    >
    >
    > ? Now I am more confused.
    > How can it be used for a novel?
    > <Chapter> ahsfblksdjhfsaj </Chapter
    > ...
    >
    > I can slightly understand it for data but am confused wholesale.
    > Is there anything that describes what/why in lay men's terms...
    >
    > <A message to top posters. Type your reply here>
    >


    Just like HTML is designed as a standardised way of representing
    structured data suitable for display on a human-readable browser, XML is
    designed as a standardised way of representing any structured data,
    whatever its meaning.

    AFAIK, the hope being that in the future documents will be much more
    portable, as applications would all be able to understand each others'
    file formats (well, the structure of them, anyway).

    Oli
    Oli Filth, Dec 30, 2004
    #4
  5. In article <>,
    says...
    > On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 19:54:38 -0000, Hywel Jenkins
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <>,
    > > says...
    > >> Apart from it being a long winded way of setting up and categorising
    > >> data what is the point?
    > >>
    > >> I know there must be a reasonable reason for it.

    > >
    > >It's portable. Supposing you are writing a novel - save it as XML then
    > >you can easily re-task the same data for print, web, PDA, whatever
    > >output you want.

    >
    > ? Now I am more confused.
    > How can it be used for a novel?
    > <Chapter> ahsfblksdjhfsaj </Chapter

    Pretty much:
    <novel>
    <author>Hywel Jenkins</author>
    <title>I'm In Charge</title>
    <chapter>
    <chaptertitle>Chapter One</chaptertitle>
    <text>
    <paragraph>This is a paragraph</paragraph>
    <paragraph>This is another paragraph</paragraph>
    </text>
    </chapter>
    <chapter>
    <chaptertitle>Chapter Two</chaptertitle>
    <text>
    <paragraph>This is a paragraph</paragraph>
    <paragraph>This is another paragraph</paragraph>
    </text>
    </chapter>
    </novel>

    --
    Hywel http://kibo.org.uk/
    I do not eat quiche.
    Hywel Jenkins, Dec 30, 2004
    #5
  6. Titus A Ducksass - AKA broken-record

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Oli Filth wrote:

    > Just like HTML is designed as a standardised way of representing
    > structured data suitable for display on a human-readable browser, XML is
    > designed as a standardised way of representing any structured data,
    > whatever its meaning.


    XML is not so much a standard way of representing data, but rather it's
    an easy(-ish) framework for creating new markup languages.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
    Toby Inkster, Jan 3, 2005
    #6
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