where does Console.WriteLine() goto?

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Flip, Nov 18, 2004.

  1. Flip

    Flip Guest

    In j2ee/JBuilder/WebLogic when you do a System.err.println(), you can see
    the messages in the console that started the server. When I tried the same
    type of thing with VS 2k3 .NET and ASPX, I don't see the messages. Where do
    they go? What is the suggest logging method to use for debugging and for
    development apps?

    I broke out the question into two parts cause I'm looking to find out how to
    do quick'n'dirty debugging on the fly vs something a bit more formal and
    dependable.

    Thanks.
     
    Flip, Nov 18, 2004
    #1
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  2. Debug.Write() and/or Trace.Write()

    --
    Daniel Fisher(lennybacon)
    MCP ASP.NET C#
    Blog: http://www.lennybacon.com/


    "Flip" <[remove]> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > In j2ee/JBuilder/WebLogic when you do a System.err.println(), you can see
    > the messages in the console that started the server. When I tried the
    > same
    > type of thing with VS 2k3 .NET and ASPX, I don't see the messages. Where
    > do
    > they go? What is the suggest logging method to use for debugging and for
    > development apps?
    >
    > I broke out the question into two parts cause I'm looking to find out how
    > to
    > do quick'n'dirty debugging on the fly vs something a bit more formal and
    > dependable.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    >
     
    Daniel Fisher\(lennybacon\), Nov 18, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Console.Write line writes to the TextWriter assigned to
    the Console.Out property. You can use Console.SetOut to
    change this.

    The recommended logging method is to use
    System.Diagnostics.Debug class for debug messages and
    System.Diagnostics.Trace class for general tracing
    messages.

    The easiest way to see trace messages in an ASP.NET
    application is to either set Trace="true" in the Page
    directive in your ASPX page to have trace messages
    included at the end of the page or configure the trace
    element in the system.web section of the web.config file.
    Like this:
    <trace enabled="true" requestLimit="10"
    pageOutput="false" traceMode="SortByTime"
    localOnly="true" />

    You can see trace messages for the entire application in
    by navigating to trace.axd on the root of the application.

    Anders Norås - blog:
    http://dotnetjunkies.com/weblog/anoras/



    >-----Original Message-----
    >In j2ee/JBuilder/WebLogic when you do a

    System.err.println(), you can see
    >the messages in the console that started the server.

    When I tried the same
    >type of thing with VS 2k3 .NET and ASPX, I don't see the

    messages. Where do
    >they go? What is the suggest logging method to use for

    debugging and for
    >development apps?
    >
    >I broke out the question into two parts cause I'm

    looking to find out how to
    >do quick'n'dirty debugging on the fly vs something a

    bit more formal and
    >dependable.
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?Anders_Nor=E5s?=, Nov 18, 2004
    #3
  4. Wondering if you ever tried them in ASP.NET.

    Eliyahu

    "Daniel Fisher(lennybacon)" <info@(removethis)lennybacon.com> wrote in
    message news:...
    > Debug.Write() and/or Trace.Write()
    >
    > --
    > Daniel Fisher(lennybacon)
    > MCP ASP.NET C#
    > Blog: http://www.lennybacon.com/
    >
    >
    > "Flip" <[remove]> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    > > In j2ee/JBuilder/WebLogic when you do a System.err.println(), you can

    see
    > > the messages in the console that started the server. When I tried the
    > > same
    > > type of thing with VS 2k3 .NET and ASPX, I don't see the messages.

    Where
    > > do
    > > they go? What is the suggest logging method to use for debugging and

    for
    > > development apps?
    > >
    > > I broke out the question into two parts cause I'm looking to find out

    how
    > > to
    > > do quick'n'dirty debugging on the fly vs something a bit more formal

    and
    > > dependable.
    > >
    > > Thanks.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Eliyahu Goldin, Nov 18, 2004
    #4
  5. Flip

    Flip Guest

    AHHH! Cool! Thank you for the information and the quick reply! :> I'll
    check this out when I get to that machine tonight! :> Thank you.
     
    Flip, Nov 18, 2004
    #5
  6. Flip

    Scott M. Guest

    >>You can see trace messages for the entire application in
    >>by navigating to trace.axd on the root of the application.


    But you must have your application running when you attempt to do so as
    trace.axd is a virtual file and does not actually exist on the hard drive.



    >-----Original Message-----
    >In j2ee/JBuilder/WebLogic when you do a

    System.err.println(), you can see
    >the messages in the console that started the server.

    When I tried the same
    >type of thing with VS 2k3 .NET and ASPX, I don't see the

    messages. Where do
    >they go? What is the suggest logging method to use for

    debugging and for
    >development apps?
    >
    >I broke out the question into two parts cause I'm

    looking to find out how to
    >do quick'n'dirty debugging on the fly vs something a

    bit more formal and
    >dependable.
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    Scott M., Nov 18, 2004
    #6
  7. Flip

    Jeff Dillon Guest

    Or just use realtime debugging in VS.NET

    Jeff
    "Anders Norås" <> wrote in message
    news:69ca01c4cd83$2e661b70$...
    Console.Write line writes to the TextWriter assigned to
    the Console.Out property. You can use Console.SetOut to
    change this.

    The recommended logging method is to use
    System.Diagnostics.Debug class for debug messages and
    System.Diagnostics.Trace class for general tracing
    messages.

    The easiest way to see trace messages in an ASP.NET
    application is to either set Trace="true" in the Page
    directive in your ASPX page to have trace messages
    included at the end of the page or configure the trace
    element in the system.web section of the web.config file.
    Like this:
    <trace enabled="true" requestLimit="10"
    pageOutput="false" traceMode="SortByTime"
    localOnly="true" />

    You can see trace messages for the entire application in
    by navigating to trace.axd on the root of the application.

    Anders Norås - blog:
    http://dotnetjunkies.com/weblog/anoras/



    >-----Original Message-----
    >In j2ee/JBuilder/WebLogic when you do a

    System.err.println(), you can see
    >the messages in the console that started the server.

    When I tried the same
    >type of thing with VS 2k3 .NET and ASPX, I don't see the

    messages. Where do
    >they go? What is the suggest logging method to use for

    debugging and for
    >development apps?
    >
    >I broke out the question into two parts cause I'm

    looking to find out how to
    >do quick'n'dirty debugging on the fly vs something a

    bit more formal and
    >dependable.
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    Jeff Dillon, Nov 18, 2004
    #7
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