You want to see small text on a website?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Mike Barnard, Mar 18, 2008.

  1. Mike Barnard

    Mike Barnard Guest

    Mike Barnard, Mar 18, 2008
    #1
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  2. Mike Barnard

    SAZ Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > Then look at this... with a magnifying glass!
    >
    > http://lexingtoninstitute.org/1240.shtml
    >
    >

    It's small, but not horribly small. I've seen several news sites use
    the same font and size.
     
    SAZ, Mar 19, 2008
    #2
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  3. Mike Barnard

    cwdjrxyz Guest

    On Mar 18, 5:09 pm, Mike Barnard <>
    wrote:
    > Then look at this... with a magnifying glass!
    >
    > http://lexingtoninstitute.org/1240.shtml


    I can read the text, but I would not like to have to read it all day,
    especially on a small screen or a monitor that is a bit out of
    adjustment. I took a glance at the external style sheet. Much of the
    font-size is 10 px. I did note one or two cases of font-size specified
    in points, with the lowest I saw was 7.5 pt.

    That text is not nearly as small as it can be. You should see a period
    specified as font-size of 1 px. In fact I used that a bit a few years
    ago. If you want to draw a colored bar somewhere on a page, you can do
    so using a division with background-color for it specified. Back then,
    and perhaps still, for some browsers the division had to have some
    content for this to work. A 1 px period in the division is all it took
    to have content in the division, and it is not noticed by most people.
    However if you specify the text color for the division about the same
    as the background color, then the period can not be seen even if you
    know exactly where it should be.
     
    cwdjrxyz, Mar 19, 2008
    #3
  4. Mike Barnard

    C A Upsdell Guest

    Mike Barnard wrote:
    > Then look at this... with a magnifying glass!
    >
    > http://lexingtoninstitute.org/1240.shtml


    One of the problems is that the first font in the font-family list is
    Verdana, which is well known to be harder to read in small sizes. The
    designer clearly has not learned this.
     
    C A Upsdell, Mar 19, 2008
    #4
  5. Mike Barnard

    dorayme Guest

    In article <frpt4l$3b3$>,
    C A Upsdell <> wrote:

    > Verdana, ... is well known to be harder to read in small sizes


    It is?

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Mar 19, 2008
    #5
  6. Mike Barnard

    Mike Barnard Guest

    On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 14:10:07 +1100, dorayme
    <> wrote:

    >In article <frpt4l$3b3$>,
    > C A Upsdell <> wrote:
    >
    >> Verdana, ... is well known to be harder to read in small sizes

    >
    >It is?


    Hehe, have I (re)started the war about verdana?
     
    Mike Barnard, Mar 19, 2008
    #6
  7. C A Upsdell wrote:

    > One of the problems is that the first font in the font-family list is
    > Verdana, which is well known to be harder to read in small sizes. The
    > designer clearly has not learned this.


    No, the problem is that Verdana is well-known to be *easy* to read as
    small sizes, which encourages designers to use tiny text "because it's in
    Verdana", forgetting that it might *not* be in Verdana on some computers.

    (e.g. they have a user stylesheet which overrides the author's font
    choice, or they don't have the font installed.)

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    [Geek of HTML/SQL/Perl/PHP/Python/Apache/Linux]
    [OS: Linux 2.6.17.14-mm-desktop-9mdvsmp, up 1 day, 13:31.]

    The Semantic Web
    http://tobyinkster.co.uk/blog/2008/03/09/sw/
     
    Toby A Inkster, Mar 19, 2008
    #7
  8. Mike Barnard

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Mike Barnard <> wrote:

    > On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 14:10:07 +1100, dorayme
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <frpt4l$3b3$>,
    > > C A Upsdell <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Verdana, ... is well known to be harder to read in small sizes

    > >
    > >It is?

    >
    > Hehe, have I (re)started the war about verdana?


    I doubt it. CA has it wrong, simple as that.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Mar 19, 2008
    #8
  9. Mike Barnard

    C A Upsdell Guest

    dorayme wrote:
    > In article <frpt4l$3b3$>,
    > C A Upsdell <> wrote:
    >
    >> Verdana, ... is well known to be harder to read in small sizes

    >
    > It is?


    Arrghhh! Brain freeze. Yes, I had it backwards.
     
    C A Upsdell, Mar 19, 2008
    #9
  10. dorayme wrote:
    > In article <frpt4l$3b3$>,
    > C A Upsdell <> wrote:
    >
    >> Verdana, ... is well known to be harder to read in small sizes

    >
    > It is?
    >

    Certainly not. The whole problem with Verdana is that no matter whether
    you declare its size to be 0.1pt or 150% or 4ex, it's drawn half a meter
    high!
     
    Harlan Messinger, Mar 19, 2008
    #10
  11. On 2008-03-19, C A Upsdell wrote:
    > Mike Barnard wrote:
    >> Then look at this... with a magnifying glass!
    >>
    >> http://lexingtoninstitute.org/1240.shtml

    >
    > One of the problems is that the first font in the font-family list is
    > Verdana, which is well known to be harder to read in small sizes. The
    > designer clearly has not learned this.


    It is exactly the opposite; Verdana is larger than other fonts for
    the same point size, and therefore more legible than other fonts
    when it is reduced.

    The problem is using a font-size other than 100%.

    --
    Chris F.A. Johnson, webmaster <http://Woodbine-Gerrard.com>
    ===================================================================
    Author:
    Shell Scripting Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach (2005, Apress)
     
    Chris F.A. Johnson, Mar 19, 2008
    #11
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