"C++11"


S

Stefan Ram

There seems to be a trend to append the version number
directly to the name, as in »HTML5« (instead of »HTML 5.0«)
or »C++11« (instead of »C++ 2011«) and »C++14« (instead of
»C++ 2014«).

When I once wrote that a new language should have a new name
in some comp.lang.c... group, people replied expressing in
written words that they disagree with me, but in reality,
today everybody writes »C++11« (and not »C++«) to refer to
»C++11« and »C++14« (and not »C++«) when referring to »C++14«.

Today, I had this idea that some of the decline of the
popularity of C++ at TIOBE might be related to search
engines possibly not finding »C++11« or »C++14« when one
searches for »C++«. Unless special rules are introduced,
they should not find »HTML5« when one searches for »HTML«,
but they would find »HTML 5« or »HTML 5.0« in this case.
 
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V

Victor Bazarov

There seems to be a trend to append the version number
directly to the name, as in »HTML5« [..]
Today, I had this idea that some of the decline of the
popularity of C++ at TIOBE might be related to search
engines possibly not finding »C++11« or »C++14« when one
searches for »C++«. [..]

<yawn>

V
 
M

Melzzzzz

On 6 Jun 2014 18:59:50 GMT
There seems to be a trend to append the version number
directly to the name, as in »HTML5« (instead of »HTML 5.0«)
or »C++11« (instead of »C++ 2011«) and »C++14« (instead of
»C++ 2014«).

When I once wrote that a new language should have a new name
in some comp.lang.c... group, people replied expressing in
written words that they disagree with me, but in reality,
today everybody writes »C++11« (and not »C++«) to refer to
»C++11« and »C++14« (and not »C++«) when referring to »C++14«.

Today, I had this idea that some of the decline of the
popularity of C++ at TIOBE might be related to search
engines possibly not finding »C++11« or »C++14« when one
searches for »C++«. Unless special rules are introduced,
they should not find »HTML5« when one searches for »HTML«,
but they would find »HTML 5« or »HTML 5.0« in this case.

Tiobe C first! Hhahahhahahahhahah
 
J

Jorgen Grahn

There seems to be a trend to append the version number
directly to the name, as in »HTML5« (instead of »HTML 5.0«)
or »C++11« (instead of »C++ 2011«) and »C++14« (instead of
»C++ 2014«).

When I once wrote that a new language should have a new name
in some comp.lang.c... group, people replied expressing in
written words that they disagree with me

I think most of us just didn't agree with your view that C++11 is a
new language. Of course different things should have different names.

/Jorgen
 
S

Stefan Ram

Jorgen Grahn said:
I think most of us just didn't agree with your view that C++11 is a
new language. Of course different things should have different names.

The definition of »language« in computer science.

»In mathematics, computer science, and linguistics, a
formal language is a set of strings of symbols that may
be constrained by rules that are specific to it.«

A Word-Wide Web encyclopedia

And when two sets only differ by a single element, they are
two different sets!

Now, you might say that this might be true formally, but
that it just does not feel like a new language, but then I
quote Bjarne Stroustrup, who says:

»C++11 feels like a new language.«

http://www.stroustrup.com/C++11FAQ.html

So, it is a new language formally, and it also feels like a
new language, and people use a new designation (»C++11«) for it.
 
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