"C++11"

Discussion in 'C++' started by Stefan Ram, Jun 6, 2014.

  1. Stefan Ram

    Stefan Ram Guest

    There seems to be a trend to append the version number
    directly to the name, as in »HTML5« (instead of »HTML 5.0«)
    or »C++11« (instead of »C++ 2011«) and »C++14« (instead of
    »C++ 2014«).

    When I once wrote that a new language should have a new name
    in some comp.lang.c... group, people replied expressing in
    written words that they disagree with me, but in reality,
    today everybody writes »C++11« (and not »C++«) to refer to
    »C++11« and »C++14« (and not »C++«) when referring to »C++14«.

    Today, I had this idea that some of the decline of the
    popularity of C++ at TIOBE might be related to search
    engines possibly not finding »C++11« or »C++14« when one
    searches for »C++«. Unless special rules are introduced,
    they should not find »HTML5« when one searches for »HTML«,
    but they would find »HTML 5« or »HTML 5.0« in this case.
     
    Stefan Ram, Jun 6, 2014
    #1
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  2. On 6/6/2014 2:59 PM, Stefan Ram wrote:
    > There seems to be a trend to append the version number
    > directly to the name, as in »HTML5« [..]
    > Today, I had this idea that some of the decline of the
    > popularity of C++ at TIOBE might be related to search
    > engines possibly not finding »C++11« or »C++14« when one
    > searches for »C++«. [..]


    <yawn>

    V
    --
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
     
    Victor Bazarov, Jun 6, 2014
    #2
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  3. Stefan Ram

    Melzzzzz Guest

    On 6 Jun 2014 18:59:50 GMT
    -berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote:

    > There seems to be a trend to append the version number
    > directly to the name, as in »HTML5« (instead of »HTML 5.0«)
    > or »C++11« (instead of »C++ 2011«) and »C++14« (instead of
    > »C++ 2014«).
    >
    > When I once wrote that a new language should have a new name
    > in some comp.lang.c... group, people replied expressing in
    > written words that they disagree with me, but in reality,
    > today everybody writes »C++11« (and not »C++«) to refer to
    > »C++11« and »C++14« (and not »C++«) when referring to »C++14«.
    >
    > Today, I had this idea that some of the decline of the
    > popularity of C++ at TIOBE might be related to search
    > engines possibly not finding »C++11« or »C++14« when one
    > searches for »C++«. Unless special rules are introduced,
    > they should not find »HTML5« when one searches for »HTML«,
    > but they would find »HTML 5« or »HTML 5.0« in this case.
    >


    Tiobe C first! Hhahahhahahahhahah

    --
    Click OK to continue...
     
    Melzzzzz, Jun 6, 2014
    #3
  4. Stefan Ram

    Jorgen Grahn Guest

    On Fri, 2014-06-06, Stefan Ram wrote:
    > There seems to be a trend to append the version number
    > directly to the name, as in »HTML5« (instead of »HTML 5.0«)
    > or »C++11« (instead of »C++ 2011«) and »C++14« (instead of
    > »C++ 2014«).
    >
    > When I once wrote that a new language should have a new name
    > in some comp.lang.c... group, people replied expressing in
    > written words that they disagree with me


    I think most of us just didn't agree with your view that C++11 is a
    new language. Of course different things should have different names.

    /Jorgen

    --
    // Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
    \X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
     
    Jorgen Grahn, Jun 6, 2014
    #4
  5. Stefan Ram

    Stefan Ram Guest

    Jorgen Grahn <> writes:
    >I think most of us just didn't agree with your view that C++11 is a
    >new language. Of course different things should have different names.


    The definition of »language« in computer science.

    »In mathematics, computer science, and linguistics, a
    formal language is a set of strings of symbols that may
    be constrained by rules that are specific to it.«

    A Word-Wide Web encyclopedia

    And when two sets only differ by a single element, they are
    two different sets!

    Now, you might say that this might be true formally, but
    that it just does not feel like a new language, but then I
    quote Bjarne Stroustrup, who says:

    »C++11 feels like a new language.«

    http://www.stroustrup.com/C++11FAQ.html

    So, it is a new language formally, and it also feels like a
    new language, and people use a new designation (»C++11«) for it.
     
    Stefan Ram, Jun 6, 2014
    #5
  6. Stefan Ram

    Ian Collins Guest

    Mr Flibble wrote:
    > On 06/06/2014 19:59, Stefan Ram wrote:
    >> There seems to be a trend to append the version number
    >> directly to the name, as in »HTML5« (instead of »HTML 5.0«)
    >> or »C++11« (instead of »C++ 2011«) and »C++14« (instead of
    >> »C++ 2014«).
    >>
    >> When I once wrote that a new language should have a new name
    >> in some comp.lang.c... group, people replied expressing in
    >> written words that they disagree with me, but in reality,
    >> today everybody writes »C++11« (and not »C++«) to refer to
    >> »C++11« and »C++14« (and not »C++«) when referring to »C++14«.
    >>
    >> Today, I had this idea that some of the decline of the
    >> popularity of C++ at TIOBE might be related to search
    >> engines possibly not finding »C++11« or »C++14« when one
    >> searches for »C++«. Unless special rules are introduced,
    >> they should not find »HTML5« when one searches for »HTML«,
    >> but they would find »HTML 5« or »HTML 5.0« in this case.

    >
    > Sausages.


    Don't forget the egg and chips.

    --
    Ian Collins
     
    Ian Collins, Jun 7, 2014
    #6
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