SyntaxError: invalid syntax (windows)

P

Python Newsgroup

I'm a total newbe to scripting not to mention python. However I was able to
successfully create a telnet script to initiate login, initiate tftp, exit,
exit, confirm and close session. Frustrated, possibly causing my own misery.
I replace the sript the script with the standard example.

import getpass
import sys
import telnetlib

HOST = "remote linux"
user = raw_input("Enter your remote account: ")
password = getpass.getpass()

tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST)

tn.read_until("login: ")
tn.write(user + "\n")
if password:
tn.read_until("Password: ")
tn.write(password + "\n")

tn.write("ls\n")
tn.write("exit\n")

print tn.read_all()

Regardless of the script content, running in windows I constently get this
SyntaxError:

C:\Python30>python c:\Python30\scripts\telnet.py
File "c:\Python30\scripts\telnet.py", line 20
print tn.read_all()
^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

C:\Python30>

The same script works fine from linux.

I have also notices some other slight differences: this is my original
script that runs and completes but only if I comment out print. Also tried
to run debug without success in windows again this worked fine in linux. To
run this script in linux I also had to remove the b syntax in the "b" in the
perentesis

import telnetlib
# import pdb

HOST = "HP switch"

tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST)

tn.read_until(b'Password: ')
tn.write(b'password\n')

pdb.set_trace()

tn.read_until(b'HP switch# ')
tn.write(b' sh time\n')

tn.read_until(b'HP switch# ')
tn.write(b'exit\n')

tn.read_until(b'HP switch> ')
tn.write(b'exit\n')

tn.read_until(b'Do you want to log out [y/n]? ')
tn.write(b'y')

print tn.read_all()

Any guidance would be appreciated.

Delrey
 
G

Gary Herron

Python said:
I'm a total newbe to scripting not to mention python. However I was
able to successfully create a telnet script to initiate login,
initiate tftp, exit, exit, confirm and close session. Frustrated,
possibly causing my own misery. I replace the sript the script with
the standard example.

import getpass
import sys
import telnetlib

HOST = "remote linux"
user = raw_input("Enter your remote account: ")
password = getpass.getpass()

tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST)

tn.read_until("login: ")
tn.write(user + "\n")
if password:
tn.read_until("Password: ")
tn.write(password + "\n")

tn.write("ls\n")
tn.write("exit\n")

print tn.read_all()

Regardless of the script content, running in windows I constently get
this SyntaxError:

C:\Python30>python c:\Python30\scripts\telnet.py
File "c:\Python30\scripts\telnet.py", line 20
print tn.read_all()
^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

C:\Python30>


There's the clue:

In python 3.X, print is a function call
print(tn.read_all() )
with lots of formatting and line-ending features

In python 2.X, print is a statement:
print tn.read_all()

If you want one script to work for both Windows and Linux, then you
should probably
be running the same version of Python on each. At least both versions
should be on
the same side for the Python 2.x/3.x version change.


Gary Herron


The same script works fine from linux.

I have also notices some other slight differences: this is my original
script that runs and completes but only if I comment out print. Also
tried to run debug without success in windows again this worked fine
in linux. To run this script in linux I also had to remove the b
syntax in the "b" in the perentesis

import telnetlib
# import pdb

HOST = "HP switch"

tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST)

tn.read_until(b'Password: ')
tn.write(b'password\n')

pdb.set_trace()

tn.read_until(b'HP switch# ')
tn.write(b' sh time\n')

tn.read_until(b'HP switch# ')
tn.write(b'exit\n')

tn.read_until(b'HP switch> ')
tn.write(b'exit\n')

tn.read_until(b'Do you want to log out [y/n]? ')
tn.write(b'y')

print tn.read_all()

Any guidance would be appreciated.

Delrey
 
M

MRAB

Python said:
I'm a total newbe to scripting not to mention python. However I was able
to successfully create a telnet script to initiate login, initiate tftp,
exit, exit, confirm and close session. Frustrated, possibly causing my
own misery. I replace the sript the script with the standard example.

import getpass
import sys
import telnetlib

HOST = "remote linux"
user = raw_input("Enter your remote account: ")
password = getpass.getpass()

tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST)

tn.read_until("login: ")
tn.write(user + "\n")
if password:
tn.read_until("Password: ")
tn.write(password + "\n")

tn.write("ls\n")
tn.write("exit\n")

print tn.read_all()

Regardless of the script content, running in windows I constently get
this SyntaxError:

C:\Python30>python c:\Python30\scripts\telnet.py
File "c:\Python30\scripts\telnet.py", line 20
print tn.read_all()
^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

C:\Python30>

The same script works fine from linux.

I have also notices some other slight differences: this is my original
script that runs and completes but only if I comment out print. Also
tried to run debug without success in windows again this worked fine in
linux. To run this script in linux I also had to remove the b syntax in
the "b" in the perentesis

import telnetlib
# import pdb

HOST = "HP switch"

tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST)

tn.read_until(b'Password: ')
tn.write(b'password\n')

pdb.set_trace()

tn.read_until(b'HP switch# ')
tn.write(b' sh time\n')

tn.read_until(b'HP switch# ')
tn.write(b'exit\n')

tn.read_until(b'HP switch> ')
tn.write(b'exit\n')

tn.read_until(b'Do you want to log out [y/n]? ')
tn.write(b'y')

print tn.read_all()

Any guidance would be appreciated.
It looks like you're using Python 3.0 on Windows and Python 2.x on
Linux.

In Python 2.x, 'print' is a statement:

print tn.read_all()


In Python 3.x, 'print' is a function, so you need to write:

print(tn.read_all())
 
P

Python Newsgroup

Thats newbe experience for ya ;-) thanks. Its seems to work and leads to
another question. whether running the script or stepping thru the process at
the command line I get what looks like hex

C:\Python30>python \Python30\scripts\telnet-tftp1.py
b'\x1b[24;1H\x1b[24;31H\x1b[24;1H\x1b[?25h\x1b[24;31H\x1b[24;31Hy\x1b[24;31H\x1b
[?25h\x1b[24;32H\x1b[24;0H\x1bE\x1b[24;1H\x1b[24;32H\x1b[24;1H\x1b[2K\x1b[24;1H\
x1b[?25h\x1b[24;1H\x1b[1;24r\x1b[24;1H\x1b[2J\x1b[?7l\x1b[1;24r\x1b[?6l\x1b[24;1
H\x1b[?25h\x1b[24;1H\x1b[?6l\x1b[1;0r\x1b[?7l\x1b[2J\x1b[24;1H\x1b[1;1H\x1b[2K\x
1b[24;1H\n\r'

C:\Python30>

I can verify the script ran thru and executed the telnet commands. is there
a switch to convert to binary/ASCI or reduce the logging of the telnet
session ???

Thanks again
Chris



Gary Herron said:
Python said:
I'm a total newbe to scripting not to mention python. However I was able
to successfully create a telnet script to initiate login, initiate tftp,
exit, exit, confirm and close session. Frustrated, possibly causing my
own misery. I replace the sript the script with the standard example.

import getpass
import sys
import telnetlib

HOST = "remote linux"
user = raw_input("Enter your remote account: ")
password = getpass.getpass()

tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST)

tn.read_until("login: ")
tn.write(user + "\n")
if password:
tn.read_until("Password: ")
tn.write(password + "\n")

tn.write("ls\n")
tn.write("exit\n")

print tn.read_all()

Regardless of the script content, running in windows I constently get
this SyntaxError:

C:\Python30>python c:\Python30\scripts\telnet.py
File "c:\Python30\scripts\telnet.py", line 20
print tn.read_all()
^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

C:\Python30>


There's the clue:

In python 3.X, print is a function call
print(tn.read_all() )
with lots of formatting and line-ending features

In python 2.X, print is a statement:
print tn.read_all()

If you want one script to work for both Windows and Linux, then you should
probably
be running the same version of Python on each. At least both versions
should be on
the same side for the Python 2.x/3.x version change.


Gary Herron


The same script works fine from linux.

I have also notices some other slight differences: this is my original
script that runs and completes but only if I comment out print. Also
tried to run debug without success in windows again this worked fine in
linux. To run this script in linux I also had to remove the b syntax in
the "b" in the perentesis

import telnetlib
# import pdb

HOST = "HP switch"

tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST)

tn.read_until(b'Password: ')
tn.write(b'password\n')

pdb.set_trace()

tn.read_until(b'HP switch# ')
tn.write(b' sh time\n')

tn.read_until(b'HP switch# ')
tn.write(b'exit\n')

tn.read_until(b'HP switch> ')
tn.write(b'exit\n')

tn.read_until(b'Do you want to log out [y/n]? ')
tn.write(b'y')

print tn.read_all()

Any guidance would be appreciated.

Delrey
 
P

Python Newsgroup

Gotcha, I got started from the telnet example listed in the docs. The linux
install was via yum and installed 2.x instead. That explains it. Althought
print (tn.read_all () ) runs in 2.x on linux.

I have another problem maybe you cna help me with. My telnet output
jibberish in windows: I cna parse some of the output for results but is
there anyway to get rid of the jibberish. (looks like hex but I'm not sure)

I can only use this tn.read_until(b'whatever string') Is this whats causing
the output? the b switch. seems like I don't need it in linux. is that
binary?

Thanks

C:\Python30>python \Python30\scripts\telnet-tftp1.py
b'\x1b[24;1H\x1b[24;31H\x1b[24;1H\x1b[?25h\x1b[24;31H\x1b[24;31Hy\x1b[24;31H\x1b
[?25h\x1b[24;32H\x1b[24;0H\x1bE\x1b[24;1H\x1b[24;32H\x1b[24;1H\x1b[2K\x1b[24;1H\
x1b[?25h\x1b[24;1H\x1b[1;24r\x1b[24;1H\x1b[2J\x1b[?7l\x1b[1;24r\x1b[?6l\x1b[24;1
H\x1b[?25h\x1b[24;1H\x1b[?6l\x1b[1;0r\x1b[?7l\x1b[2J\x1b[24;1H\x1b[1;1H\x1b[2K\x
1b[24;1H\n\r'

C:\Python30>




MRAB said:
Python said:
I'm a total newbe to scripting not to mention python. However I was able
to successfully create a telnet script to initiate login, initiate tftp,
exit, exit, confirm and close session. Frustrated, possibly causing my
own misery. I replace the sript the script with the standard example.

import getpass
import sys
import telnetlib

HOST = "remote linux"
user = raw_input("Enter your remote account: ")
password = getpass.getpass()

tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST)

tn.read_until("login: ")
tn.write(user + "\n")
if password:
tn.read_until("Password: ")
tn.write(password + "\n")

tn.write("ls\n")
tn.write("exit\n")

print tn.read_all()

Regardless of the script content, running in windows I constently get
this SyntaxError:

C:\Python30>python c:\Python30\scripts\telnet.py
File "c:\Python30\scripts\telnet.py", line 20
print tn.read_all()
^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

C:\Python30>

The same script works fine from linux.

I have also notices some other slight differences: this is my original
script that runs and completes but only if I comment out print. Also
tried to run debug without success in windows again this worked fine in
linux. To run this script in linux I also had to remove the b syntax in
the "b" in the perentesis

import telnetlib
# import pdb

HOST = "HP switch"

tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST)

tn.read_until(b'Password: ')
tn.write(b'password\n')

pdb.set_trace()

tn.read_until(b'HP switch# ')
tn.write(b' sh time\n')

tn.read_until(b'HP switch# ')
tn.write(b'exit\n')

tn.read_until(b'HP switch> ')
tn.write(b'exit\n')

tn.read_until(b'Do you want to log out [y/n]? ')
tn.write(b'y')

print tn.read_all()

Any guidance would be appreciated.
It looks like you're using Python 3.0 on Windows and Python 2.x on
Linux.

In Python 2.x, 'print' is a statement:

print tn.read_all()


In Python 3.x, 'print' is a function, so you need to write:

print(tn.read_all())
 
M

MRAB

Python said:
Gotcha, I got started from the telnet example listed in the docs. The
linux install was via yum and installed 2.x instead. That explains it.
Althought print (tn.read_all () ) runs in 2.x on linux.

I have another problem maybe you cna help me with. My telnet output
jibberish in windows: I cna parse some of the output for results but is
there anyway to get rid of the jibberish. (looks like hex but I'm not sure)

I can only use this tn.read_until(b'whatever string') Is this whats
causing the output? the b switch. seems like I don't need it in linux.
is that binary?

Thanks

C:\Python30>python \Python30\scripts\telnet-tftp1.py
b'\x1b[24;1H\x1b[24;31H\x1b[24;1H\x1b[?25h\x1b[24;31H\x1b[24;31Hy\x1b[24;31H\x1b

[?25h\x1b[24;32H\x1b[24;0H\x1bE\x1b[24;1H\x1b[24;32H\x1b[24;1H\x1b[2K\x1b[24;1H\

x1b[?25h\x1b[24;1H\x1b[1;24r\x1b[24;1H\x1b[2J\x1b[?7l\x1b[1;24r\x1b[?6l\x1b[24;1

H\x1b[?25h\x1b[24;1H\x1b[?6l\x1b[1;0r\x1b[?7l\x1b[2J\x1b[24;1H\x1b[1;1H\x1b[2K\x

1b[24;1H\n\r'

C:\Python30>
They look like control sequences for a terminal.
 
T

Terry Reedy

MRAB said:
Python said:
Gotcha, I got started from the telnet example listed in the docs. The
linux install was via yum and installed 2.x instead. That explains it.
Althought print (tn.read_all () ) runs in 2.x on linux.

I have another problem maybe you cna help me with. My telnet output
jibberish in windows: I cna parse some of the output for results but
is there anyway to get rid of the jibberish. (looks like hex but I'm
not sure)

I can only use this tn.read_until(b'whatever string') Is this whats
causing the output? the b switch. seems like I don't need it in linux.
is that binary?

Thanks

C:\Python30>python \Python30\scripts\telnet-tftp1.py
b'\x1b[24;1H\x1b[24;31H\x1b[24;1H\x1b[?25h\x1b[24;31H\x1b[24;31Hy\x1b[24;31H\x1b

[?25h\x1b[24;32H\x1b[24;0H\x1bE\x1b[24;1H\x1b[24;32H\x1b[24;1H\x1b[2K\x1b[24;1H\

x1b[?25h\x1b[24;1H\x1b[1;24r\x1b[24;1H\x1b[2J\x1b[?7l\x1b[1;24r\x1b[?6l\x1b[24;1

H\x1b[?25h\x1b[24;1H\x1b[?6l\x1b[1;0r\x1b[?7l\x1b[2J\x1b[24;1H\x1b[1;1H\x1b[2K\x

1b[24;1H\n\r'

C:\Python30>
They look like control sequences for a terminal.

Indeed. \x1b == \033 == 27 == ESCAPE. 'ESC [' is the standard prefix
for ANSI terminal control sequences.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI_escape_code

"32-bit character-mode (subsystem:console) Windows applications don't
write ANSI escape sequences to the console. They must interpret the
escape code actions and call the native Console API instead to
accomplish the proper result. If you do write the sequences directly,
all you'll get is the text of the sequence on the screen, not the action
intended."

I mostly see a crazy mixture of ESC [ row , col H cursor position
commands. For you app, parse out and ignore the codes not skipped by
..read_until calls.


Terry Jan Reedy
 

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