All types of Programming related issues.

Discussion in 'Java' started by john, Dec 19, 2006.

  1. john

    john Guest

    john, Dec 19, 2006
    #1
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  2. john

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    Daniel Pitts, Dec 20, 2006
    #2
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  3. Daniel Pitts <> wrote:

    > john wrote:
    > > http://www.spammed-url.removed


    > That site sucks.


    Then why did you give the spammer the free publicity it wanted?

    --
    C. Benson Manica | I *should* know what I'm talking about - if I
    cbmanica(at)gmail.com | don't, I need to know. Flames welcome.
     
    Christopher Benson-Manica, Dec 20, 2006
    #3
  4. Christopher Benson-Manica wrote:
    > Daniel Pitts <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>john wrote:
    >>
    >>>http://www.spammed-url.removed

    >
    >
    >>That site sucks.

    >
    >
    > Then why did you give the spammer the free publicity it wanted?


    He didn't give "it" any more than "it" got "it"self with the initial
    post, unless he broadened the newsgroup list. As far as I can tell, if
    anything he narrowed it to just cljp.

    Also, if every posting of a URL, even when it's seemingly (at least
    tangentially) on topic, constitutes spamming, then an awful lot of the
    regulars in this group are spammers. :)
     
    John Ersatznom, Dec 21, 2006
    #4
  5. John Ersatznom <> wrote:

    > He didn't give "it" any more than "it" got "it"self with the initial
    > post, unless he broadened the newsgroup list. As far as I can tell, if
    > anything he narrowed it to just cljp.


    Every additional mention of a spammed URL increases the likelihood
    that it will be seen and visited. (Or perhaps I am merely being too
    comp.lang.c about the situation...)

    > Also, if every posting of a URL, even when it's seemingly (at least
    > tangentially) on topic, constitutes spamming, then an awful lot of the
    > regulars in this group are spammers. :)


    Posting URLs might be acceptable when they are accompanied by some
    on-topic introductory text, say "There is some good information here
    about Java". As it stands, the original post looks like some generic,
    throwaway post to drive traffic to yet another wannabe Official Source
    For Everything.

    --
    C. Benson Manica | I *should* know what I'm talking about - if I
    cbmanica(at)gmail.com | don't, I need to know. Flames welcome.
     
    Christopher Benson-Manica, Dec 21, 2006
    #5
  6. Christopher Benson-Manica wrote:
    > Every additional mention of a spammed URL increases the likelihood
    > that it will be seen and visited. (Or perhaps I am merely being too
    > comp.lang.c about the situation...)


    If the mentions are in independent locations, that's true. But the
    likelihood is changed the *least* in the precise situation that
    occurred, where one occurrence is in the parent of the other occurrence
    and in the exact same groups. They tend to be either both seen, or
    neither seen, by any given person in that case.

    > Posting URLs might be acceptable when they are accompanied by some
    > on-topic introductory text, say "There is some good information here
    > about Java". As it stands, the original post looks like some generic,
    > throwaway post to drive traffic to yet another wannabe Official Source
    > For Everything.


    It's a pretty iffy call in this case. The post that started this thread
    was, you must admit, a far cry from things like someone writing "#3rb4l
    V1Agr4!!! Get it while it's hot!" (continuing with several links to
    dubious www.foo.ru servers, or even blind IP addresses) and massively
    x-posting it to every group in the world *except* alt.pharmaceuticals ... :)
     
    John Ersatznom, Dec 21, 2006
    #6
  7. john

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "John Ersatznom" <> wrote in message
    news:emd3fs$u4b$...
    >
    > Also, if every posting of a URL, even when it's seemingly (at least
    > tangentially) on topic, constitutes spamming, then an awful lot of the
    > regulars in this group are spammers. :)


    FWIW, my definition of a newsgroup spammer (and I don't necessarily
    expect anyone else to share this definition) is someone who makes a post
    with no intent to read the replies.

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Dec 21, 2006
    #7
  8. Oliver Wong wrote:
    > "John Ersatznom" <> wrote in message
    > news:emd3fs$u4b$...
    >
    >>Also, if every posting of a URL, even when it's seemingly (at least
    >>tangentially) on topic, constitutes spamming, then an awful lot of the
    >>regulars in this group are spammers. :)

    >
    >
    > FWIW, my definition of a newsgroup spammer (and I don't necessarily
    > expect anyone else to share this definition) is someone who makes a post
    > with no intent to read the replies.


    That definition makes everyone who's ever posted "PLONK!" anywhere on
    Usenet into a spammer.
     
    John Ersatznom, Dec 22, 2006
    #8
  9. john

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "John Ersatznom" <> wrote in message
    news:emgb78$j2$...
    > Oliver Wong wrote:
    >> "John Ersatznom" <> wrote in message
    >> news:emd3fs$u4b$...
    >>
    >>>Also, if every posting of a URL, even when it's seemingly (at least
    >>>tangentially) on topic, constitutes spamming, then an awful lot of the
    >>>regulars in this group are spammers. :)

    >>
    >>
    >> FWIW, my definition of a newsgroup spammer (and I don't necessarily
    >> expect anyone else to share this definition) is someone who makes a post
    >> with no intent to read the replies.

    >
    > That definition makes everyone who's ever posted "PLONK!" anywhere on
    > Usenet into a spammer.


    No, they may still be willing to read replies to that "PLONK" post (as
    long as it's not from the person who got plonked).

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Dec 22, 2006
    #9
  10. Oliver Wong wrote:
    > No, they may still be willing to read replies to that "PLONK" post (as
    > long as it's not from the person who got plonked).


    Who replies to a plonk post, though? Except, occasionally and
    pointlessly, the person who got plonked. (Maybe seeking to have the last
    word?)
     
    John Ersatznom, Dec 23, 2006
    #10
  11. John Ersatznom <> wrote:

    > Who replies to a plonk post, though? Except, occasionally and
    > pointlessly, the person who got plonked. (Maybe seeking to have the last
    > word?)


    Well, on comp.lang.c at least, a PLONK has a non-zero chance of
    eliciting a post to the effect of "Please keep your plonks to
    yourself" :)

    --
    C. Benson Manica | I *should* know what I'm talking about - if I
    cbmanica(at)gmail.com | don't, I need to know. Flames welcome.
     
    Christopher Benson-Manica, Dec 23, 2006
    #11
  12. Christopher Benson-Manica wrote:
    > John Ersatznom <> wrote:
    >
    >>Who replies to a plonk post, though? Except, occasionally and
    >>pointlessly, the person who got plonked. (Maybe seeking to have the last
    >>word?)

    >
    > Well, on comp.lang.c at least, a PLONK has a non-zero chance of
    > eliciting a post to the effect of "Please keep your plonks to
    > yourself" :)


    Does anyone ever read these?
     
    John Ersatznom, Dec 24, 2006
    #12
  13. john

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "John Ersatznom" <> wrote in message
    news:emm1m6$51n$...
    > Christopher Benson-Manica wrote:
    >> John Ersatznom <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Who replies to a plonk post, though? Except, occasionally and
    >>>pointlessly, the person who got plonked. (Maybe seeking to have the last
    >>>word?)

    >>
    >> Well, on comp.lang.c at least, a PLONK has a non-zero chance of
    >> eliciting a post to the effect of "Please keep your plonks to
    >> yourself" :)

    >
    > Does anyone ever read these?


    Yes. Christopher Benson-Manica has read it at least once, or else he
    wouldn't have known about them.

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Dec 27, 2006
    #13
  14. john

    jupiter Guest

    "Christopher Benson-Manica" <> wrote in
    message news:embmo4$o6i$...
    > Daniel Pitts <> wrote:
    >
    >> john wrote:
    >> > http://www.spammed-url.removed

    >
    >> That site sucks.

    >
    > Then why did you give the spammer the free publicity it wanted?


    I read the spam and immediately went to the first reply, which
    definitely provided me with the proper feedback.

    I've always believed in kicking the shit out of spam. If a newbie
    can see it getting the shit kicked out of it and still clicks on
    the link, well, it's not my Good Samaritan's job to save him. Some
    people cannot be saved.

    I also thought "That site sucks" was a nice boost of humor for the
    otherwise dreary day. It's pithy and full of inyourendo. Three
    words and a period, that's all it took. That is like nice code,
    isn't it?
     
    jupiter, Dec 28, 2006
    #14
  15. john

    jupiter Guest

    "Oliver Wong" <> wrote in message
    news:c3ykh.62238$...
    > "John Ersatznom" <> wrote in message
    > news:emm1m6$51n$...
    >> Christopher Benson-Manica wrote:
    >>> John Ersatznom <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Who replies to a plonk post, though? Except, occasionally and
    >>>>pointlessly, the person who got plonked. (Maybe seeking to have
    >>>>the last word?)
    >>>
    >>> Well, on comp.lang.c at least, a PLONK has a non-zero chance of
    >>> eliciting a post to the effect of "Please keep your plonks to
    >>> yourself" :)

    >>
    >> Does anyone ever read these?

    >
    > Yes. Christopher Benson-Manica has read it at least once, or
    > else he wouldn't have known about them.
    >


    Has anybody done a scan of that OP at the byte code level?

    [ducking]
     
    jupiter, Dec 28, 2006
    #15
  16. jupiter wrote:
    > "Oliver Wong" <> wrote in message
    > news:c3ykh.62238$...
    >
    >>"John Ersatznom" <> wrote in message
    >>news:emm1m6$51n$...
    >>
    >>>Christopher Benson-Manica wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>John Ersatznom <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Who replies to a plonk post, though? Except, occasionally and
    >>>>>pointlessly, the person who got plonked. (Maybe seeking to have
    >>>>>the last word?)
    >>>>
    >>>>Well, on comp.lang.c at least, a PLONK has a non-zero chance of
    >>>>eliciting a post to the effect of "Please keep your plonks to
    >>>>yourself" :)
    >>>
    >>>Does anyone ever read these?

    >>
    >> Yes. Christopher Benson-Manica has read it at least once, or
    >>else he wouldn't have known about them.

    >
    > Has anybody done a scan of that OP at the byte code level?


    You'll probably find that all his methods are private and he doesn't
    declare a public interface. (Just like most large corporations with
    their unsupportably bad products and/or services, not to mention most
    women, these days.)
     
    John Ersatznom, Dec 29, 2006
    #16
  17. John Ersatznom <> wrote:

    > You'll probably find that all his methods are private and he doesn't
    > declare a public interface. (Just like most large corporations with
    > their unsupportably bad products and/or services, not to mention most
    > women, these days.)


    I'm a man, not vaporware ;-) (The buyMeBeer() method is public and
    can work around most any internal bugs, although I'm not unit tested.)

    --
    C. Benson Manica | I *should* know what I'm talking about - if I
    cbmanica(at)gmail.com | don't, I need to know. Flames welcome.
     
    Christopher Benson-Manica, Dec 29, 2006
    #17
  18. Christopher Benson-Manica wrote:
    > John Ersatznom <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>You'll probably find that all his methods are private and he doesn't
    >>declare a public interface. (Just like most large corporations with
    >>their unsupportably bad products and/or services, not to mention most
    >>women, these days.)

    >
    > I'm a man, not vaporware ;-) (The buyMeBeer() method is public and
    > can work around most any internal bugs, although I'm not unit tested.)


    Not much help to me. Seems you're a singleton with a private constructor
    and I've never met your factory class let alone accessed her public
    interface.

    What's a man to do?
     
    John Ersatznom, Jan 4, 2007
    #18
  19. John Ersatznom wrote:
    > Christopher Benson-Manica wrote:
    >>
    >> I'm a man, not vaporware ;-) (The buyMeBeer() method is public and
    >> can work around most any internal bugs, although I'm not unit tested.)

    >
    > Not much help to me. Seems you're a singleton with a private constructor
    > and I've never met your factory class let alone accessed her public
    > interface.
    >
    > What's a man to do?


    Well, showing up well dressed[1] and groomed on the first date and
    buying her flowers won't hurt.
    Also, you *could* express your desire to "access her pub(l)ic interface"
    with a little more delicate phrasing. Most women tend to take offence if
    you call their interface public, even if it is. ("Would you like to come
    over to my place for coffee and a nice chat?" works wonders in many
    cases. "Would you like to dance?" can give you a nice feel of her public
    members, too. *wink*)

    [1] No, I do not mean the _clean_ anime T-shirt, I'm talking pressed
    trousers and white collars here.

    --
    -Aki Laukkanen
     
    Aki Laukkanen, Jan 4, 2007
    #19
  20. Aki Laukkanen wrote:
    > John Ersatznom wrote:
    >
    >> Christopher Benson-Manica wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> I'm a man, not vaporware ;-) (The buyMeBeer() method is public and
    >>> can work around most any internal bugs, although I'm not unit tested.)

    >>
    >>
    >> Not much help to me. Seems you're a singleton with a private
    >> constructor and I've never met your factory class let alone accessed
    >> her public interface.
    >>
    >> What's a man to do?

    >
    > Well, showing up well dressed[1] and groomed on the first date and
    > buying her flowers won't hurt.
    > Also, you *could* express your desire to "access her pub(l)ic interface"
    > with a little more delicate phrasing. Most women tend to take offence if
    > you call their interface public, even if it is. ("Would you like to come
    > over to my place for coffee and a nice chat?" works wonders in many
    > cases. "Would you like to dance?" can give you a nice feel of her public
    > members, too. *wink*)
    >
    > [1] No, I do not mean the _clean_ anime T-shirt, I'm talking pressed
    > trousers and white collars here.


    Isn't that only applicable to those really formal occasions where nobody
    shows up without at least three layers of indirection and a veritable
    cloud of auxiliary classes serving their needs? You know the type, all
    hoity-toity in their fancy JDBC getups and sequined all over with EJBs
    and gold-plated servlet containers...you know, the upper *business*
    class that look down their noses at a mere JavaBean and aspire to hobnob
    with the *real* Bank-and-BankAccount set, though they keep getting
    nothing but SecurityExceptions...
     
    John Ersatznom, Jan 6, 2007
    #20
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