Bloated webservice

Discussion in 'ASP .Net Web Services' started by PKSpence, Oct 28, 2005.

  1. PKSpence

    PKSpence Guest

    I'm currently involved with a classic ASP project that consumes an in-house
    developed webservice written in VB.NET. The webservice is approaching 50K
    lines of code with no end in site. Presently, it takes about 30-seconds for
    the webservice to load before an interface is displayed. Some of the methods
    are specific for a particular module of the app and aren't used anywhere
    else w/in the app. My question is... would be a better practice to break up
    some of the w/s code into different classes, then load those classes as
    they're needed. Currently *all* the code is in one class. What are the
    advantages and disadvantages of taking this approach? We're about to
    starting two new modules to the webapp and now would be the time to start
    employing this methodology if it's advantageous to do so.

    Thanks!
    PKSpence, Oct 28, 2005
    #1
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  2. PKSpence

    PKSpence Guest

    No response?

    "PKSpence" <> wrote in message
    news:e1BsIU$...
    > I'm currently involved with a classic ASP project that consumes an
    > in-house developed webservice written in VB.NET. The webservice is
    > approaching 50K lines of code with no end in site. Presently, it takes
    > about 30-seconds for the webservice to load before an interface is
    > displayed. Some of the methods are specific for a particular module of the
    > app and aren't used anywhere else w/in the app. My question is... would be
    > a better practice to break up some of the w/s code into different classes,
    > then load those classes as they're needed. Currently *all* the code is in
    > one class. What are the advantages and disadvantages of taking this
    > approach? We're about to starting two new modules to the webapp and now
    > would be the time to start employing this methodology if it's advantageous
    > to do so.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    PKSpence, Nov 2, 2005
    #2
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  3. PKSpence wrote:
    > No response?
    >

    Hi

    I will give one :)

    One disadvantage I could think (if I have to find one) is that your
    client (classic ASP webapp) have to look up two services. Hmm.. no big
    deal, but like I said: If I have to find a disadvantage.

    Generally it is (at least I think so) considered a good approach to
    design your webservices coarsegrained. But the one you seem to be
    developing seems VERY coarsegrainged.

    Try to model the services around the business domains that your services
    access, eg. accounting, inventory, sales, etc, and create a service for
    each domain.
    You will find yourself in "in-your-head-discussions" of where to put (in
    which service) some of the webmethods, but that is only naturally :)
    And most important of all. It is the foundation of separation of concerns.

    Hope that helps.

    Regards
    Henrik
    Henrik Gøttig, Nov 3, 2005
    #3
  4. PKSpence

    PKSpence Guest

    Thanks for your input! It sounds like you're suggesting to separate the
    business domains into different webservices, not classes w/in the same
    webservice. Correct?



    "Henrik Gøttig" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > PKSpence wrote:
    >> No response?
    >>

    > Hi
    >
    > I will give one :)
    >
    > One disadvantage I could think (if I have to find one) is that your client
    > (classic ASP webapp) have to look up two services. Hmm.. no big deal, but
    > like I said: If I have to find a disadvantage.
    >
    > Generally it is (at least I think so) considered a good approach to design
    > your webservices coarsegrained. But the one you seem to be developing
    > seems VERY coarsegrainged.
    >
    > Try to model the services around the business domains that your services
    > access, eg. accounting, inventory, sales, etc, and create a service for
    > each domain.
    > You will find yourself in "in-your-head-discussions" of where to put (in
    > which service) some of the webmethods, but that is only naturally :)
    > And most important of all. It is the foundation of separation of concerns.
    >
    > Hope that helps.
    >
    > Regards
    > Henrik
    >
    PKSpence, Nov 3, 2005
    #4
  5. PKSpence wrote:
    > Thanks for your input! It sounds like you're suggesting to separate the
    > business domains into different webservices, not classes w/in the same
    > webservice. Correct?
    >
    >
    >


    Yes, that is exactly what I am suggesting.
    Henrik Gøttig, Nov 7, 2005
    #5
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