"Click here" continued...

Discussion in 'HTML' started by David Segall, Apr 25, 2009.

  1. David Segall

    David Segall Guest

    As everybody knows using "click here" as a link is deprecated
    <http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/noClickHere>. One of my web pages
    <http://profectus.com.au/ee_getdata.html> contains the sentence "The
    relevant chapter can be downloaded from here" and I have used the word
    "here" as the link. Presumably, the W3C is implying that "from here"
    is redundant. Which words in the revised sentence - "The relevant
    chapter can be downloaded" - should be the new link?
     
    David Segall, Apr 25, 2009
    #1
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  2. David Segall wrote:

    > As everybody knows using "click here" as a link is deprecated
    > <http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/noClickHere>.


    Right. See also http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www/click.html

    > One of my web pages
    > <http://profectus.com.au/ee_getdata.html> contains the sentence "The
    > relevant chapter can be downloaded from here" and I have used the word
    > "here" as the link. Presumably, the W3C is implying that "from here"
    > is redundant.


    Probably, and in any case it bad style.

    > Which words in the revised sentence - "The relevant
    > chapter can be downloaded" - should be the new link?


    If that's how you formulate it, then "The relevant chapter" would be
    suitable as link text. You might consider omitting the article from the link
    text.

    But it would be much better to write e.g.

    The relevant chapter, <cite><a href="...">Zen and the art of
    yawning</a></cite>, is available for download.

    or even just

    The relevant chapter is <cite><a href="...">Zen and the art of
    yawning</a></cite>.

    or (if other chapters aren't online etc.)

    The relevant chapter, <cite><a href="...">Zen and the art of
    yawning</a></cite>, is available online.

    (Avoid mentioning technicalities. Downloading is just one thing you can do
    with a link.)

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Apr 25, 2009
    #2
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  3. David Segall wrote:

    > As everybody knows using "click here" as a link is deprecated
    > <http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/noClickHere>.


    I wouldn't say 'deprecated' but rather just in bad taste. ;-)

    > One of my web pages <http://profectus.com.au/ee_getdata.html> contains
    > the sentence "The relevant chapter can be downloaded from here" and I
    > have used the word "here" as the link. Presumably, the W3C is
    > implying that "from here" is redundant. Which words in the revised
    > sentence - "The relevant chapter can be downloaded" - should be the
    > new link?


    Download the <a href='filename.pdf'>relevant chapter</a> [PDF, 100KB].

    I do believe I read somewhere that one should use nouns for the link
    text, not verbs, adverbs, etc. An appropriate adjective might help.

    --
    -bts
    -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Apr 25, 2009
    #3
  4. David Segall

    richard Guest

    On Sat, 25 Apr 2009 15:59:16 GMT, David Segall <>
    wrote:

    >As everybody knows using "click here" as a link is deprecated
    ><http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/noClickHere>. One of my web pages
    ><http://profectus.com.au/ee_getdata.html> contains the sentence "The
    >relevant chapter can be downloaded from here" and I have used the word
    >"here" as the link. Presumably, the W3C is implying that "from here"
    >is redundant. Which words in the revised sentence - "The relevant
    >chapter can be downloaded" - should be the new link?



    How about: "Download the relevant chapter as a text file now".

    People generally understand most anything that has a single line under
    it, or the line shows on mouseover, is a link of some sort.
     
    richard, Apr 25, 2009
    #4
  5. David Segall

    +mrcakey Guest

    "David Segall" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > As everybody knows using "click here" as a link is deprecated
    > <http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/noClickHere>. One of my web pages
    > <http://profectus.com.au/ee_getdata.html> contains the sentence "The
    > relevant chapter can be downloaded from here" and I have used the word
    > "here" as the link. Presumably, the W3C is implying that "from here"
    > is redundant. Which words in the revised sentence - "The relevant
    > chapter can be downloaded" - should be the new link?


    One of the reasons it's deprecated is that certain screen readers list the
    links in a document at the beginning stripped of their context. For example,
    a user might browse to a page and hear "home, about us, profile, contact,
    login, click here, click here, click here, download it here, click here"
    etc.

    For this reason, Jukka's solution is the most appropriate since it makes
    sense even when stripped of the context of the surrounding text. When I'm
    faced with similar situations I try to get away from the call to action
    within the link text, e.g. <p><a etc...>read the relevant chapter
    here</a></p> and try to use the link to describe what it's pointing at, e.g.
    <p>The chapter on <a etc...>servlets and JSP</a> is available online</p>.

    As well as being essential for accessibility and a boon for usability, it's
    excellent for giving your number one blind user a hint about what the link
    is pointing at.

    --
    +mrcakey
    www.dreamberry.co.uk
     
    +mrcakey, Apr 26, 2009
    #5
  6. David Segall

    David Segall Guest

    "Jukka K. Korpela" <> wrote:

    >David Segall wrote:
    >
    >> As everybody knows using "click here" as a link is deprecated
    >> <http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/noClickHere>.

    >
    >Right. See also http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www/click.html
    >
    >> One of my web pages
    >> <http://profectus.com.au/ee_getdata.html> contains the sentence "The
    >> relevant chapter can be downloaded from here" and I have used the word
    >> "here" as the link. Presumably, the W3C is implying that "from here"
    >> is redundant.

    >
    >Probably, and in any case it bad style.
    >
    >> Which words in the revised sentence - "The relevant
    >> chapter can be downloaded" - should be the new link?

    >
    >If that's how you formulate it, then "The relevant chapter" would be
    >suitable as link text. You might consider omitting the article from the link
    >text.
    >
    >But it would be much better to write e.g.
    >
    >The relevant chapter, <cite><a href="...">Zen and the art of
    >yawning</a></cite>, is available for download.
    >
    >or even just
    >
    >The relevant chapter is <cite><a href="...">Zen and the art of
    >yawning</a></cite>.
    >
    >or (if other chapters aren't online etc.)
    >
    >The relevant chapter, <cite><a href="...">Zen and the art of
    >yawning</a></cite>, is available online.
    >
    >(Avoid mentioning technicalities. Downloading is just one thing you can do
    >with a link.)


    Thank you. You have provided what I consider to be a model answer to a
    "How do I..." question. You answered the question as I presented it
    and then provided a better solution to the problem and explained why
    it was better. I chose your first suggestion.

    I don't know whether to thank or curse you for your subtle indication
    that I have omitted the <cite> tag. I think I have included it
    correctly on the reference page but it raises a question that I have
    posed in a new thread. In any case, it means that I have to revise my
    entire site to include the <cite> tag where appropriate.
     
    David Segall, Apr 29, 2009
    #6
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