Confused updating 2.3 to 2.4 on Linux

Discussion in 'Python' started by Glen, Dec 17, 2004.

  1. Glen

    Glen Guest

    Being a new'ish user to both Linux and Python, I've been 'happily'
    learning Python (2.3) with Idle and Tkinter as installed with Mandrake
    10.
    Thought I would try installing Python 2.4 (to completely replace 2.3)
    (first time I've tried installing anything from source)

    Followed the readme file (all done from my 'home' directory),

    tar -zxvf Python-2.4.tgz
    ./configure
    make
    make test (2 skips unexpected on linux2:test_bz2 test_gdbm)
    make install

    Although I wasn't sure about some of the directory references,
    'type "./configure" in the current directory'
    'type "make" in the toplevel directory'.

    All seemed to work without any errors, but starting Python from Idle
    or a console displays the same statup text,

    Python 2.3.3 (#2, Feb 17 2004, 11:45:40)
    [GCC 3.3.2 (Mandrake Linux 10.0 3.3.2-6mdk)] on linux2

    'which python' shows /usr/bin/python, and this file has not been updated

    Is there something else I should do?
    Also 'IF' I get 2.4 working, will Tkinter/Idle need any additional
    installation work, or is it all done through the Python 2.4 installation
    Glen, Dec 17, 2004
    #1
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  2. Glen

    Mike Meyer Guest

    Glen <> writes:

    > Being a new'ish user to both Linux and Python, I've been 'happily'
    > learning Python (2.3) with Idle and Tkinter as installed with Mandrake
    > 10.
    > All seemed to work without any errors, but starting Python from Idle
    > or a console displays the same statup text,
    >
    > Python 2.3.3 (#2, Feb 17 2004, 11:45:40)
    > [GCC 3.3.2 (Mandrake Linux 10.0 3.3.2-6mdk)] on linux2
    >
    > 'which python' shows /usr/bin/python, and this file has not been updated
    >
    > Is there something else I should do?


    The default install location for python is /usr/local, not /usr. You
    can change your PATH so that /usr/local/bin precedes /usr/bin, and
    then you'll get the new Python.

    BTW, installing a new python doesn't "completely replace" the old
    python on Unix systems. Python installs everything but one file in
    directories that include the version number, so that people (mostly
    developers) can keep multiple versions around with no problem. The one
    exception is bin/python, which is a hard link to the last python you
    installed.

    If you look, you'll find /usr/lib/python2.3, /usr/include/python2.3,
    /usr/local/lib/python2.4, /usr/local/include/python2.4,
    /usr/bin/python2.3, /usr/local/bin/python2.3, /usr/bin/python (the
    same as /usr/bin/python2.3) and /usr/local/bin/python (which is the
    same as /usr/local/bin/python2.4).

    If you want, you can rebuild python with:

    ./configure --prefix=/usr
    make install

    and it will put the directories in parallel with the old ones, instead
    of putting them in /usr/local.

    <mike
    --
    Mike Meyer <> http://www.mired.org/home/mwm/
    Independent WWW/Perforce/FreeBSD/Unix consultant, email for more information.
    Mike Meyer, Dec 17, 2004
    #2
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  3. Glen

    Glen Guest

    > > Being a new'ish user to both Linux and Python, I've been 'happily'
    > > learning Python (2.3) with Idle and Tkinter as installed with Mandrake
    > > 10.
    > > All seemed to work without any errors, but starting Python from Idle
    > > or a console displays the same statup text,
    > >
    > > Python 2.3.3 (#2, Feb 17 2004, 11:45:40)
    > > [GCC 3.3.2 (Mandrake Linux 10.0 3.3.2-6mdk)] on linux2
    > >
    > > 'which python' shows /usr/bin/python, and this file has not been updated
    > >
    > > Is there something else I should do?

    >
    > The default install location for python is /usr/local, not /usr. You
    > can change your PATH so that /usr/local/bin precedes /usr/bin, and
    > then you'll get the new Python.
    >
    > BTW, installing a new python doesn't "completely replace" the old
    > python on Unix systems. Python installs everything but one file in
    > directories that include the version number, so that people (mostly
    > developers) can keep multiple versions around with no problem. The one
    > exception is bin/python, which is a hard link to the last python you
    > installed.
    >
    > If you look, you'll find /usr/lib/python2.3, /usr/include/python2.3,
    > /usr/local/lib/python2.4, /usr/local/include/python2.4,
    > /usr/bin/python2.3, /usr/local/bin/python2.3, /usr/bin/python (the
    > same as /usr/bin/python2.3) and /usr/local/bin/python (which is the
    > same as /usr/local/bin/python2.4).
    >
    > If you want, you can rebuild python with:
    >
    > ./configure --prefix=/usr
    > make install
    >
    > and it will put the directories in parallel with the old ones, instead
    > of putting them in /usr/local.
    >
    > <mike


    Thanks Mike, that's great
    Glen, Dec 17, 2004
    #3
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