Eclipse, Netbeans, Android

Discussion in 'Java' started by Dirk Bruere at NeoPax, Nov 18, 2010.

  1. I normally write Java using Netbeans.
    What would people here recommend for doing Android stuff?
    We have decided to develop for Android now that it looks to be the
    future ie iPad is dumped.

    Bear in mind that I have a lot of apps already written in Java (for PC)
    using Netbeans and would like to port them with minimal hassle.

    --
    Dirk

    http://www.transcendence.me.uk/ - Transcendence UK
    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/onetribe - Occult Talk Show
     
    Dirk Bruere at NeoPax, Nov 18, 2010
    #1
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  2. Dirk Bruere at NeoPax

    Lew Guest

    On 11/18/2010 07:27 AM, Dirk Bruere at NeoPax wrote:
    > I normally write Java using Netbeans.
    > What would people here recommend for doing Android stuff?


    I plan to use NetBeans.

    Eclipse, emacs and vi are some other options.

    > We have decided to develop for Android now that it looks to be the
    > future ie iPad is dumped.
    >
    > Bear in mind that I have a lot of apps already written in Java (for PC)
    > using Netbeans and would like to port them with minimal hassle.


    The IDE has no effect on porting as such, although your comfort level with one
    temporarily affects velocity until the learning curve kicks in. Neither Java
    nor Dalvik depend on your IDE.

    I'd start here:
    <http://developer.android.com/>
    particularly
    <http://developer.android.com/guide/developing/eclipse-adt.html>
    <http://developer.android.com/guide/developing/other-ide.html>

    since it is perfectly amazing what the project documents can tell you.

    Also,
    <http://lmgtfy.com/?q=IDEs+for+Android+development>

    --
    Lew
     
    Lew, Nov 18, 2010
    #2
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  3. Dirk Bruere at NeoPax

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 18-11-2010 07:27, Dirk Bruere at NeoPax wrote:
    > I normally write Java using Netbeans.
    > What would people here recommend for doing Android stuff?
    > We have decided to develop for Android now that it looks to be the
    > future ie iPad is dumped.
    >
    > Bear in mind that I have a lot of apps already written in Java (for PC)
    > using Netbeans and would like to port them with minimal hassle.


    Android suggest Eclipse themselves:
    http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html
    so that will probably be the easiest.

    In the end it is just Java code, so you can use any IDE incl. NB.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Nov 18, 2010
    #3
  4. On 18. 11. 10. 10:59 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > On 18-11-2010 07:27, Dirk Bruere at NeoPax wrote:
    >> I normally write Java using Netbeans.
    >> What would people here recommend for doing Android stuff?
    >> We have decided to develop for Android now that it looks to be the
    >> future ie iPad is dumped.
    >>
    >> Bear in mind that I have a lot of apps already written in Java (for PC)
    >> using Netbeans and would like to port them with minimal hassle.

    >
    > Android suggest Eclipse themselves:
    > http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html
    > so that will probably be the easiest.


    It is. And it's all hassle-free. Get Android SDK and install Eclipse
    plug in, tell it where the SDK is and you're good to go. Build, run and
    debug, emulate, view logcat, all straight from Eclipse.

    It's much easier than using some other IDE, especially if one uses
    declarative approach, ie. xml descriptors for defining resources (and
    that's the recommended way to write Android apps), because of that nifty
    auto-generated R class.
     
    Screamin' Lord Byron, Nov 19, 2010
    #4
  5. On 19/11/2010 16:32, Screamin' Lord Byron wrote:
    > On 18. 11. 10. 10:59 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >> On 18-11-2010 07:27, Dirk Bruere at NeoPax wrote:
    >>> I normally write Java using Netbeans.
    >>> What would people here recommend for doing Android stuff?
    >>> We have decided to develop for Android now that it looks to be the
    >>> future ie iPad is dumped.
    >>>
    >>> Bear in mind that I have a lot of apps already written in Java (for PC)
    >>> using Netbeans and would like to port them with minimal hassle.

    >>
    >> Android suggest Eclipse themselves:
    >> http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html
    >> so that will probably be the easiest.

    >
    > It is. And it's all hassle-free. Get Android SDK and install Eclipse
    > plug in, tell it where the SDK is and you're good to go. Build, run and
    > debug, emulate, view logcat, all straight from Eclipse.
    >
    > It's much easier than using some other IDE, especially if one uses
    > declarative approach, ie. xml descriptors for defining resources (and
    > that's the recommended way to write Android apps), because of that nifty
    > auto-generated R class.


    OK - done it.
    Eclipse it is from now on.
    Pity about Netbeans, as I had got quite used to it.
    Now another PITA learning curve...

    --
    Dirk

    http://www.transcendence.me.uk/ - Transcendence UK
    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/onetribe - Occult Talk Show
     
    Dirk Bruere at NeoPax, Nov 19, 2010
    #5
  6. Dirk Bruere at NeoPax

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 19-11-2010 17:32, Steve Sobol wrote:
    > On Fri, 19 Nov 2010 17:32:58 +0100
    > Screamin' Lord Byron<> wrote:
    >>> Android suggest Eclipse themselves:
    >>> http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html
    >>> so that will probably be the easiest.

    >>
    >> It is. And it's all hassle-free. Get Android SDK and install Eclipse
    >> plug in, tell it where the SDK is and you're good to go. Build, run and
    >> debug, emulate, view logcat, all straight from Eclipse.
    >>
    >> It's much easier than using some other IDE, especially if one uses
    >> declarative approach, ie. xml descriptors for defining resources (and
    >> that's the recommended way to write Android apps), because of that nifty
    >> auto-generated R class.

    >
    > I'll second that suggestion. I'm just starting to develop Android apps and Eclipse has made it easy to do :)


    Note that this does not imply that Eclipse is "better"
    than NetBeans.

    It just means that Google chose Eclipse as their standard for Android
    and it is usually easier to go with the providers standard. It is
    better tested and better documented.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Nov 19, 2010
    #6
  7. Dirk Bruere at NeoPax

    Lew Guest

    Dirk Bruere at NeoPax wrote:
    > OK - done it.
    > Eclipse it is from now on.
    > Pity about Netbeans, as I had got quite used to it.
    > Now another PITA learning curve...


    Tell me again why you aren't using NetBeans, then? It's not like anyone's
    *forcing* you to use Eclipse.

    I just brought up a NetBeans Android project in twenty minutes from looking up
    the instructions to new project up and running, including downloading the plugin.

    --
    Lew
     
    Lew, Nov 21, 2010
    #7
  8. On 20-11-2010 20:42, Lew wrote:
    > Dirk Bruere at NeoPax wrote:
    >> OK - done it.
    >> Eclipse it is from now on.
    >> Pity about Netbeans, as I had got quite used to it.
    >> Now another PITA learning curve...

    >
    > Tell me again why you aren't using NetBeans, then? It's not like
    > anyone's *forcing* you to use Eclipse.
    >
    > I just brought up a NetBeans Android project in twenty minutes from
    > looking up the instructions to new project up and running, including
    > downloading the plugin.


    He can use anything.

    But it can be practical especially for a beginner to
    go with the crowd.

    Quote from:

    http://developer.android.com/resources/tutorials/hello-world.html

    "This tutorial assumes that you're using Eclipse. If you're not, see
    Developing in Other IDEs. You can then return to this tutorial and
    ignore anything about Eclipse."

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Nov 21, 2010
    #8
  9. Dirk Bruere at NeoPax

    Lew Guest

    Dirk Bruere at NeoPax wrote:
    >>> OK - done it.
    >>> Eclipse it is from now on.
    >>> Pity about Netbeans, as I had got quite used to it.
    >>> Now another PITA learning curve...


    Lew wrote:
    >> Tell me again why you aren't using NetBeans, then? It's not like
    >> anyone's *forcing* you to use Eclipse.
    >>
    >> I just brought up a NetBeans Android project in twenty minutes from
    >> looking up the instructions to new project up and running, including
    >> downloading the plugin.


    Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > He can use anything.
    >
    > But it can be practical especially for a beginner to
    > go with the crowd.
    >
    > Quote from:
    >
    > http://developer.android.com/resources/tutorials/hello-world.html
    >
    > "This tutorial assumes that you're using Eclipse. If you're not, see
    > Developing in Other IDEs. You can then return to this tutorial and
    > ignore anything about Eclipse."


    You heard the man. He's complained about Eclipse. He expressed a preference
    for NetBeans. Don't you want to help him have what he wants? Why not give
    him the information that fulfills his preference and let him decide?

    --
    Lew
     
    Lew, Nov 21, 2010
    #9
  10. On 21. 11. 10. 2:42 AM, Lew wrote:
    > Dirk Bruere at NeoPax wrote:
    >> OK - done it.
    >> Eclipse it is from now on.
    >> Pity about Netbeans, as I had got quite used to it.
    >> Now another PITA learning curve...

    >
    > Tell me again why you aren't using NetBeans, then? It's not like
    > anyone's *forcing* you to use Eclipse.
    >
    > I just brought up a NetBeans Android project in twenty minutes from
    > looking up the instructions to new project up and running, including
    > downloading the plugin.


    Of course you can do that, but then you're missing the goodies of the
    Eclipse plugin, such as visual xml editor (with room for improvement,
    though, but still), autocomplete for xml resource descriptors (along
    with docs), resource templates, AVD management (creating or starting
    AVDs), auto (re)generation of the R class (upon xml file save), and few
    other Android-specific tools that can make life a bit easier.

    The bottom line is, like you said, no one is forcing anyone. We're just
    saying that it's a little bit easier to go with Eclipse and official
    Android plugin, especially if you're just starting out.

    I would encourage OP to try both, and see if the advantages of the
    Eclipse plugin are really worth the time of adapting to Eclipse for him.
     
    Screamin' Lord Byron, Nov 21, 2010
    #10
  11. On 20-11-2010 21:21, Lew wrote:
    > Dirk Bruere at NeoPax wrote:
    >>>> OK - done it.
    >>>> Eclipse it is from now on.
    >>>> Pity about Netbeans, as I had got quite used to it.
    >>>> Now another PITA learning curve...

    >
    > Lew wrote:
    >>> Tell me again why you aren't using NetBeans, then? It's not like
    >>> anyone's *forcing* you to use Eclipse.
    >>>
    >>> I just brought up a NetBeans Android project in twenty minutes from
    >>> looking up the instructions to new project up and running, including
    >>> downloading the plugin.

    >
    > Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >> He can use anything.
    >>
    >> But it can be practical especially for a beginner to
    >> go with the crowd.
    >>
    >> Quote from:
    >>
    >> http://developer.android.com/resources/tutorials/hello-world.html
    >>
    >> "This tutorial assumes that you're using Eclipse. If you're not, see
    >> Developing in Other IDEs. You can then return to this tutorial and
    >> ignore anything about Eclipse."

    >
    > You heard the man. He's complained about Eclipse. He expressed a
    > preference for NetBeans. Don't you want to help him have what he wants?
    > Why not give him the information that fulfills his preference and let
    > him decide?


    He asked "What would people here recommend for doing Android stuff?".

    There is huge benefits by using the IDE that the official
    Android tutorial and examples uses.

    So he got good recommendations for the question he asked.

    It is not very realistic to consider a single tools best for
    all usages.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Nov 21, 2010
    #11
  12. Dirk Bruere at NeoPax

    Lew Guest

    On 11/21/2010 11:20 AM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > On 20-11-2010 21:21, Lew wrote:
    >> Dirk Bruere at NeoPax wrote:
    >>>>> OK - done it.
    >>>>> Eclipse it is from now on.
    >>>>> Pity about Netbeans, as I had got quite used to it.
    >>>>> Now another PITA learning curve...

    >>
    >> Lew wrote:
    >>>> Tell me again why you aren't using NetBeans, then? It's not like
    >>>> anyone's *forcing* you to use Eclipse.
    >>>>
    >>>> I just brought up a NetBeans Android project in twenty minutes from
    >>>> looking up the instructions to new project up and running, including
    >>>> downloading the plugin.

    >>
    >> Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >>> He can use anything.
    >>>
    >>> But it can be practical especially for a beginner to
    >>> go with the crowd.
    >>>
    >>> Quote from:
    >>>
    >>> http://developer.android.com/resources/tutorials/hello-world.html
    >>>
    >>> "This tutorial assumes that you're using Eclipse. If you're not, see
    >>> Developing in Other IDEs. You can then return to this tutorial and
    >>> ignore anything about Eclipse."

    >>
    >> You heard the man. He's complained about Eclipse. He expressed a
    >> preference for NetBeans. Don't you want to help him have what he wants?
    >> Why not give him the information that fulfills his preference and let
    >> him decide?

    >
    > He asked "What would people here recommend for doing Android stuff?".
    >
    > There is huge benefits by using the IDE that the official
    > Android tutorial and examples uses.
    >
    > So he got good recommendations for the question he asked.
    >
    > It is not very realistic to consider a single tools best for
    > all usages.


    No one is denying what people suggest about Eclipse. I responded to the OP's
    explicit concern that it would be a "PITA" to learn Eclipse, and his express
    desire to figure out how to use NetBeans. So I provided the information the
    OP requested. You apparently feel that that freedom of choice should be
    suppressed, and contradict your own suggestion that "It is not very realistic
    to consider a single tools best for all usages." If you truly believed that,
    you'd allow the comparison and let the OP make up their own mind.

    --
    Lew
     
    Lew, Nov 21, 2010
    #12
  13. Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    [ SNIP ]
    > He asked "What would people here recommend for doing Android stuff?".
    >
    > There is huge benefits by using the IDE that the official
    > Android tutorial and examples uses.
    >
    > So he got good recommendations for the question he asked.
    >
    > It is not very realistic to consider a single tools best for
    > all usages.
    >
    > Arne


    I agree. You can do all things Java in every Java-capable IDE, but they all
    have different pain thresholds for different tasks. Reworded, how
    comprehensive and reliable and intuitive is the IDE's support for feature X?
    That's one factor - feature support. So we know Android development is
    oriented on Eclipse.

    A second factor is uniformity of work environment, which figures for team
    development. It can be important for individuals too if you have lots of
    projects on the go. You want your team to be using the same stuff and be
    configured the same way.

    A third factor is individual developer familiarity: what do they use the
    most? Eclipse, NB, IDEA, etc?

    I usually rank the factors in this order: 1. feature support, 2. uniformity,
    3. developer preferences.

    It's not good for a developer to _require_ a specific IDE (*).

    AHS

    * I'm minded of that right now. :) I'm spending 3 days a week on one client
    site doing J2EE in Eclipse 3.5, with occasional support for an auxiliary
    program in NB, 2 days a week doing custom Java workflow for FileNet in
    Eclipse for another client, _this_ weekend I have to finish writing a custom
    FileNet Capture component in VB 6, _and_ I'm supporting POCs that we're
    doing using GWT and jQuery. :) Not much room for getting comfortable with
    IDEs here, is my point.
    --
    Hanging one scoundrel, it appears, does not deter the next. Well, what
    of it? The first one is at least disposed of. -- H.L. Mencken
     
    Arved Sandstrom, Nov 21, 2010
    #13
  14. On 21-11-2010 11:48, Lew wrote:
    > On 11/21/2010 11:20 AM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >> On 20-11-2010 21:21, Lew wrote:
    >>> Dirk Bruere at NeoPax wrote:
    >>>>>> OK - done it.
    >>>>>> Eclipse it is from now on.
    >>>>>> Pity about Netbeans, as I had got quite used to it.
    >>>>>> Now another PITA learning curve...
    >>>
    >>> Lew wrote:
    >>>>> Tell me again why you aren't using NetBeans, then? It's not like
    >>>>> anyone's *forcing* you to use Eclipse.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I just brought up a NetBeans Android project in twenty minutes from
    >>>>> looking up the instructions to new project up and running, including
    >>>>> downloading the plugin.
    >>>
    >>> Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >>>> He can use anything.
    >>>>
    >>>> But it can be practical especially for a beginner to
    >>>> go with the crowd.
    >>>>
    >>>> Quote from:
    >>>>
    >>>> http://developer.android.com/resources/tutorials/hello-world.html
    >>>>
    >>>> "This tutorial assumes that you're using Eclipse. If you're not, see
    >>>> Developing in Other IDEs. You can then return to this tutorial and
    >>>> ignore anything about Eclipse."
    >>>
    >>> You heard the man. He's complained about Eclipse. He expressed a
    >>> preference for NetBeans. Don't you want to help him have what he wants?
    >>> Why not give him the information that fulfills his preference and let
    >>> him decide?

    >>
    >> He asked "What would people here recommend for doing Android stuff?".
    >>
    >> There is huge benefits by using the IDE that the official
    >> Android tutorial and examples uses.
    >>
    >> So he got good recommendations for the question he asked.
    >>
    >> It is not very realistic to consider a single tools best for
    >> all usages.

    >
    > No one is denying what people suggest about Eclipse. I responded to the
    > OP's explicit concern that it would be a "PITA" to learn Eclipse, and
    > his express desire to figure out how to use NetBeans. So I provided the
    > information the OP requested. You apparently feel that that freedom of
    > choice should be suppressed, and contradict your own suggestion that "It
    > is not very realistic to consider a single tools best for all usages."
    > If you truly believed that, you'd allow the comparison and let the OP
    > make up their own mind.


    If you think that recommending Eclipse because Android recommends
    is suppressing his freedom of choice, then I strongly suspect
    that you must have bumped your head against something recently.

    He asked for recommendations. He got recommendations. No one
    is forcing him to follow those recommendations.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Nov 21, 2010
    #14
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