good way to set cross-platform development with version control

Discussion in 'Java' started by chewie54, Jan 21, 2008.

  1. chewie54

    chewie54 Guest

    Hi All,

    I'm working on a CAD type application that can be used on Windows,
    Linux, and Macs. I have a laptop that dual boots with Windows XP or
    Ubuntu Linux and I also have a new iMac.

    I want to setup the project directories so that maybe I can access the
    source from any machine to compile and test the application.

    Would it be possible to setup a version control repository ( maybe
    subversion) so all the machines could access the source code and
    supporting application files?

    How do other cross-platform developers deal with this situation?

    Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
    chewie54, Jan 21, 2008
    #1
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  2. chewie54

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 12:50:41 -0800 (PST), chewie54
    <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who
    said :

    >Would it be possible to setup a version control repository ( maybe
    >subversion) so all the machines could access the source code and
    >supporting application files?


    see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/versioncontrol.html
    --
    Roedy Green, Canadian Mind Products
    The Java Glossary, http://mindprod.com
    Roedy Green, Jan 21, 2008
    #2
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  3. chewie54

    Lew Guest

    Roedy Green wrote:
    > On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 12:50:41 -0800 (PST), chewie54
    > <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who
    > said :
    >
    >> Would it be possible to setup a version control repository ( maybe
    >> subversion [sic]) so all the machines could access the source code and
    >> supporting application files?

    >
    > see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/versioncontrol.html


    In short, CVS, Subversion and the other major players set up version control
    repositories that not only can be reached on the LAN, but on the WAN (i.e.,
    over the Web).

    Version control would be pretty worthless if you couldn't do that, since its
    main use case is for team projects.

    That said, I use CVS for even my one-person projects. I am my own teammate in
    that scenario - and I sure do appreciate the ability to back off versions,
    track changes, and deploy specific snapshots.

    Anyway, bottom line, every useful version control system (and many of the less
    useful ones, like ClearCase or the MKS offering) has network accessibility as
    one of its most fundamental features. So, OP, yes to your question.

    Have a go at the documentation - it's pretty remarkable how much information
    one can glean from the manual.

    <http://subversion.tigris.org/>
    <http://ximbiot.com/cvs/manual/>

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Jan 21, 2008
    #3
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