Guidance needed from java gurus

Discussion in 'Java' started by new, Jul 13, 2006.

  1. new

    new Guest

    Hello Java gurus,

    Here is my background before my question. I was a chemist (master's in
    Chemistry and worked about 2 years) before I studied Computer Science.
    Due to health reasons (breast surgery - minor - and nasal condition, I
    just made the grade).

    It has been 2 1/2 years since graduation - I have been teaching
    Chemistry part time at college but am not out of touch with programming
    completely though no industrial experience or useful personal projects
    because of situation sin my life.

    Now I really want to get more skills in Java so that I can find a
    Programmer Analysts job in Medicianl Chemistry called "Cheminformatics"
    where the requirements says BS/MS in Chemistry or Computer Science"
    with experience in java, web programming, jsp, Oracle.

    Getting to use my chemistry knowledge as a programmer would be my dream
    come true.

    I really want to spend time doing projects to learned advanced level
    java features. Can anyone guide me how to go about it? Say books where
    I can follow step by step learning and do the assignments, etc. I'd
    really appreciate it. What advanced topic I should cover? I wan
    ttobget to the stage where I can install Apache server or Tomcat

    Despite IT job disappearing, I want to try this because I know that I
    will be excited to work and it won't be just to have an income.

    I'd really appreciate any help on textbooks info (I have Deitel's How
    to and Thinking in java 2nd ed), good tutorial sites, and other
    sources. Should I take Sun Cerification exams? What book should I use
    to prepare? I can't flunk since I can't afford to waste $ or time.
    new, Jul 13, 2006
    #1
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  2. new

    new Guest

    BTW, I also have

    Aside from Java How to Program (6th Edition) (How to Program (Deitel))
    by Harvey M. Deitel - I hate the way they go about hings on and on - I
    also have

    "Java : An Introduction to Problem Solving and Programming (4th
    Edition) by Walter Savitch. I bought this for an online class I will be
    taking in fall. I already finished chapter 3 which are basic stuff .

    BTW, I am very familiar wihtt he fundmentals f programming, control
    structure, loops, methds.
    new, Jul 13, 2006
    #2
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  3. new

    Chris Uppal Guest

    new wrote:

    > BTW, I am very familiar wihtt he fundmentals f programming, control
    > structure, loops, methds.


    It sounds as if you have (or are planning to get) more than enough books. I
    urge you to get programming!

    More precisely, I urge you to spend as much time writing programs (which don't
    have to have anything to do with Web technologies unless you are personally
    fascinated by them) as you can. Get used to designing classes and creating
    objects which do something interesting (to you).

    /Then/ you can start on web technologies with a proper grounding in Java
    programming under your belt already.

    -- chris
    Chris Uppal, Jul 15, 2006
    #3
  4. new

    new Guest

    About taking Java Cert exam for programmers

    Chris Uppal wrote:
    > new wrote:
    >
    > > BTW, I am very familiar wihtt he fundmentals f programming, control
    > > structure, loops, methds.

    >
    > It sounds as if you have (or are planning to get) more than enough books.

    I was concern about the books I have - thinking in Java - being out of
    date. I happened to have latest Deitel book but I don't like to read
    that book. Savitch's book is just intro and so felt that I needed more.


    > I urge you to get programming!


    Yes, I need to do just that.


    >
    > More precisely, I urge you to spend as much time writing programs (which don't
    > have to have anything to do with Web technologies


    Thanks for the guidance.

    >unless you are personally fascinated by them) as you can.
    > Get used to designing classes and creating objects which do something interesting (to you).
    >
    > /Then/ you can start on web technologies with a proper grounding in Java
    > programming under your belt already.


    Yes, proper grounding is what I want. Right now, I have bit's of
    knowledge of a lot of things in my head - at school, I took DBMS, Web
    Database developement, UML, and other SWEN clasess; exposed to many
    different things but not knowing anything confidently well.

    Now that my health is okay - just feel old after losing so much time:)-
    I want to get going with this as fast as possible.

    I am thinking that Getting Java Certification (for progremmer) no later
    than by the end of this year might be the way to comepensate for havign
    graduated 3 years ago. Otherwise, how else would anyone reading my
    resume knows that I have that basic knowledge since I haven't done any
    personal projects to show. Any info on the cert books that covers all
    areas of the exam for programmer?
    new, Jul 17, 2006
    #4
  5. new

    Chris Uppal Guest

    Re: About taking Java Cert exam for programmers

    new wrote:

    > I am thinking that Getting Java Certification (for progremmer) no later
    > than by the end of this year might be the way to comepensate for havign
    > graduated 3 years ago. Otherwise, how else would anyone reading my
    > resume knows that I have that basic knowledge since I haven't done any
    > personal projects to show. Any info on the cert books that covers all
    > areas of the exam for programmer?


    I'm afraid I know nothing about certification, and what (if any) books will
    help with that.

    I'm not certain, but it seems to me that you may be confusing two different
    things -- namely gaining experience and practice, and having /proof/ that you
    gained experience and practise. I admit that for someone who has been so far
    (as I understand it) "only" a student, it can be hard to distinguish the two
    (educational systems seem almost deliberately to encourage the confusion).
    Still, what you need now is practice. If you can also get pieces of paper then
    that's fine, but it's the practise itself that will benefit you.

    I think you said that your biggest concern was getting a hot start so as not to
    waste time, or risk failing, when you start another course as a student.
    Gaining certification would not in itself reduce either risk (though the
    practise you put in would). If you are also concerned about whether you can
    gain entry to your intended course without formal experience, then that could
    certainly be a valid concern, but if so then I'd suggest talking to the people
    who run the course to see what they would consider a worthwhile interim
    programme for you to follow.

    -- chris
    Chris Uppal, Jul 18, 2006
    #5
  6. new

    me Guest

    Re: About taking Java Cert exam for programmers

    Chris Uppal wrote:
    > new wrote:
    >
    > > I am thinking that Getting Java Certification (for progremmer) no later
    > > than by the end of this year might be the way to comepensate for havign
    > > graduated 3 years ago. Otherwise, how else would anyone reading my
    > > resume knows that I have that basic knowledge since I haven't done any
    > > personal projects to show. Any info on the cert books that covers all
    > > areas of the exam for programmer?

    >
    > I'm afraid I know nothing about certification, and what (if any) books will
    > help with that.

    Okay.

    >
    > I'm not certain, but it seems to me that you may be confusing two different
    > things -- namely gaining experience and practice, and having /proof/ that you
    > gained experience and practise.


    I wasn't confused but cert as a way to show that I haven't discarded
    java but I understand your point. It's a waste of time.

    > I admit that for someone who has been so far
    > (as I understand it) "only" a student, it can be hard to distinguish the two
    > (educational systems seem almost deliberately to encourage the confusion).


    > Still, what you need now is practice. If you can also get pieces of paper then
    > that's fine, but it's the practise itself that will benefit you.
    >
    > I think you said that your biggest concern was getting a hot start so as not to
    > waste time, or risk failing, when you start another course as a student.


    I was talking about failing the cert exam but I have discarded the idea
    about cert. I, now want to show what I have been coding, etc.

    > Gaining certification would not in itself reduce either risk (though the
    > practise you put in would). If you are also concerned about whether you can
    > gain entry to your intended course without formal experience, then that could
    > certainly be a valid concern, but if so then I'd suggest talking to the people
    > who run the course to see what they would consider a worthwhile interim
    > programme for you to follow.
    >
    > -- chris
    me, Jul 20, 2006
    #6
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