"hello world server/client"

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Hughzers, Dec 6, 2009.

  1. Hughzers

    Hughzers Guest

    Im new to "Visual Studio" and I recently got a free copy of VS 2010.
    Currently im interested in making a client and a server that sends the
    string "hello world" from one program to another. It involves linking
    libs.

    Where I am at the moment:
    I cant even compile "hello world" in Visual Studio.
    :(
    Hughzers, Dec 6, 2009
    #1
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  2. Hughzers

    Noob Guest

    Hughzers wrote:

    > Im new to "Visual Studio" and I recently got a free copy of VS 2010.
    > Currently im interested in making a client and a server that sends the
    > string "hello world" from one program to another. It involves linking
    > libs.
    >
    > Where I am at the moment:
    > I cant even compile "hello world" in Visual Studio.


    You might get some help in comp.os.ms-windows.programmer.win32
    Noob, Dec 7, 2009
    #2
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  3. Hughzers

    Tom St Denis Guest

    On Dec 6, 12:46 pm, Hughzers <> wrote:
    > Im new to "Visual Studio" and I recently got a free copy of VS 2010.
    > Currently im interested in making a client and a server that sends the
    > string "hello world" from one program to another. It involves linking
    > libs.
    >
    > Where I am at the moment:
    > I cant even compile "hello world" in Visual Studio.
    > :(


    In all honesty, if your goal is to become a software developer, learn
    to use the compiler from the command line, then with a makefile to do
    proper builds before trying to learn Visual Studio.

    What you'll learn from using the tools yourself will be infinitely
    applicable to any software developers life, whereas what you learn in
    visual studio is only useful in [that incarnation] of visual studio...

    Tom
    Tom St Denis, Dec 7, 2009
    #3
  4. In article <>,
    Tom St Denis <> wrote:
    >On Dec 6, 12:46 pm, Hughzers <> wrote:
    >> Im new to "Visual Studio" and I recently got a free copy of VS 2010.
    >> Currently im interested in making a client and a server that sends the
    >> string "hello world" from one program to another. It involves linking
    >> libs.
    >>
    >> Where I am at the moment:
    >> I cant even compile "hello world" in Visual Studio.
    >> :(

    >
    >In all honesty, if your goal is to become a software developer, learn
    >to use the compiler from the command line, then with a makefile to do
    >proper builds before trying to learn Visual Studio.
    >
    >What you'll learn from using the tools yourself will be infinitely
    >applicable to any software developers life, whereas what you learn in
    >visual studio is only useful in [that incarnation] of visual studio...


    Many companies today explicitly forbid the use of the command line,
    because they *want* us all to become mouse clickers. The idea is that
    most people employed in software today do not have the mental ability to
    handle to command line, so if *you* use the command line, your stuff
    won't be maintainable by the masses.
    Kenny McCormack, Dec 7, 2009
    #4
  5. Hughzers

    Tom St Denis Guest

    On Dec 7, 12:11 pm, (Kenny McCormack)
    wrote:
    > In article <..com>,
    > Tom St Denis  <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >On Dec 6, 12:46 pm, Hughzers <> wrote:
    > >> Im new to "Visual Studio" and I recently got a free copy of VS 2010.
    > >> Currently im interested in making a client and a server that sends the
    > >> string "hello world" from one program to another. It involves linking
    > >> libs.

    >
    > >> Where I am at the moment:
    > >> I cant even compile "hello world" in Visual Studio.
    > >> :(

    >
    > >In all honesty, if your goal is to become a software developer, learn
    > >to use the compiler from the command line, then with a makefile to do
    > >proper builds before trying to learn Visual Studio.

    >
    > >What you'll learn from using the tools yourself will be infinitely
    > >applicable to any software developers life, whereas what you learn in
    > >visual studio is only useful in [that incarnation] of visual studio...

    >
    > Many companies today explicitly forbid the use of the command line,
    > because they *want* us all to become mouse clickers.  The idea is that
    > most people employed in software today do not have the mental ability to
    > handle to command line, so if *you* use the command line, your stuff
    > won't be maintainable by the masses.


    Presumably, and I'm just spit balling here... but you ought to learn
    how to develop software BEFORE you're gainfully employed as a
    developer.

    If you end up in a shop using XYZ, then use XYZ. But that doesn't
    mean you can't do whatever you want beforehand...

    Tom
    Tom St Denis, Dec 7, 2009
    #5
  6. On 7 Dec, 17:50, Tom St Denis <> wrote:
    > On Dec 7, 12:11 pm, (Kenny McCormack)
    > > In article <>,
    > > Tom St Denis  <> wrote:
    > > >On Dec 6, 12:46 pm, Hughzers <> wrote:



    > > >> Im new to "Visual Studio" and I recently got a free copy of VS 2010.
    > > >> Currently im interested in making a client and a server that sends the
    > > >> string "hello world" from one program to another. It involves linking
    > > >> libs.


    it does? sounds like some sort of IPC stuff to me.

    > > >> Where I am at the moment:
    > > >> I cant even compile "hello world" in Visual Studio.
    > > >> :(


    I found the help quite helpful. Try an MS newsgroup.

    > > >In all honesty, if your goal is to become a software developer, learn
    > > >to use the compiler from the command line, then with a makefile to do
    > > >proper builds before trying to learn Visual Studio.


    I really don't see why. I'm quite happy with VS on Windows.


    > > >What you'll learn from using the tools yourself will be infinitely
    > > >applicable to any software developers life, whereas what you learn in
    > > >visual studio is only useful in [that incarnation] of visual studio...


    visual studio doesn't change that much


    > > Many companies today explicitly forbid the use of the command line,
    > > because they *want* us all to become mouse clickers.


    wow. Never heard of that. Really quite scarey.


    > > The idea is that
    > > most people employed in software today do not have the mental ability to
    > > handle to command line, so if *you* use the command line, your stuff
    > > won't be maintainable by the masses.


    on the other hand if the project has chosen to use VS (or whatever)
    having one developer going off doing his own things is an unnecessary
    pain.


    > Presumably, and I'm just spit balling here... but you ought to learn
    > how to develop software BEFORE you're gainfully employed as a
    > developer.


    isn't there a bit of a chicken and egg problem there? Didn't there
    used to be this thing called "training"?

    > If you end up in a shop using XYZ, then use XYZ.  But that doesn't
    > mean you can't do whatever you want beforehand...
    Nick Keighley, Dec 8, 2009
    #6
  7. On 7 Dec, 17:11, (Kenny McCormack) wrote:
    > In article <..com>,
    > Tom St Denis  <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >On Dec 6, 12:46 pm, Hughzers <> wrote:
    > >> Im new to "Visual Studio" and I recently got a free copy of VS 2010.
    > >> Currently im interested in making a client and a server that sends the
    > >> string "hello world" from one program to another. It involves linking
    > >> libs.

    >
    > >> Where I am at the moment:
    > >> I cant even compile "hello world" in Visual Studio.
    > >> :(

    >
    > >In all honesty, if your goal is to become a software developer, learn
    > >to use the compiler from the command line, then with a makefile to do
    > >proper builds before trying to learn Visual Studio.

    >
    > >What you'll learn from using the tools yourself will be infinitely
    > >applicable to any software developers life, whereas what you learn in
    > >visual studio is only useful in [that incarnation] of visual studio...

    >
    > Many companies today explicitly forbid the use of the command line,
    > because they *want* us all to become mouse clickers.  The idea is that
    > most people employed in software today do not have the mental ability to
    > handle to command line, so if *you* use the command line, your stuff
    > won't be maintainable by the masses


    on a mature development a build should just be a click or a single CLI
    command. Only a few people need to be intimately familiar with the
    build system.
    Nick Keighley, Dec 8, 2009
    #7
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