Here's something fun...

Discussion in 'HTML' started by HC, Apr 6, 2005.

  1. HC

    HC Guest

    I'm doing some contract job for a company, writing a web-based application
    for their staff to use. The fun part is, it'll only ever be used in one
    browser with one operating system, so I don't need to particularly worry
    about the user having Javascript disabled or having an old browser. I can
    use all the fancy tricks I want, and this is a client that likes that.

    I'm enjoying it :)
     
    HC, Apr 6, 2005
    #1
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  2. "HC" <> wrote:

    > I'm doing some contract job for a company, writing a web-based application
    > for their staff to use. The fun part is, it'll only ever be used in one
    > browser with one operating system, so I don't need to particularly worry
    > about the user having Javascript disabled or having an old browser. I can
    > use all the fancy tricks I want, and this is a client that likes that.


    Out of curiosity, will it still work when -- as inevitable -- they have
    to upgrade browser and/or O/S?

    How good _is_ your crystal ball?

    --
    Joel.
     
    Joel Shepherd, Apr 6, 2005
    #2
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  3. HC

    Sid Ismail Guest

    On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 04:09:35 GMT, "HC" <>
    wrote:

    : I'm doing some contract job for a company, writing a web-based application
    : for their staff to use. The fun part is, it'll only ever be used in one
    : browser with one operating system, so I don't need to particularly worry
    : about the user having Javascript disabled or having an old browser. I can
    : use all the fancy tricks I want, and this is a client that likes that.
    :
    : I'm enjoying it :)


    OK - I play bridge for that same thrill.

    Sid
     
    Sid Ismail, Apr 6, 2005
    #3
  4. HC

    Don Guest

    On 05 Apr 2005 Sid Ismail wrote in alt.html

    > On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 04:09:35 GMT, "HC" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >: I'm doing some contract job for a company, writing a web-based application
    >: for their staff to use. The fun part is, it'll only ever be used in one
    >: browser with one operating system, so I don't need to particularly worry
    >: about the user having Javascript disabled or having an old browser. I can
    >: use all the fancy tricks I want, and this is a client that likes that.
    >:
    >: I'm enjoying it :)
    >
    >
    > OK - I play bridge for that same thrill.
    >
    > Sid
    >
    >


    You just lost your geek status. :(

    --
    Don
     
    Don, Apr 6, 2005
    #4
  5. Joel Shepherd wrote:
    > "HC" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I'm doing some contract job for a company, writing a web-based application
    >>for their staff to use. The fun part is, it'll only ever be used in one
    >>browser with one operating system, so I don't need to particularly worry
    >>about the user having Javascript disabled or having an old browser. I can
    >>use all the fancy tricks I want, and this is a client that likes that.

    >
    >
    > Out of curiosity, will it still work when -- as inevitable -- they have
    > to upgrade browser and/or O/S?
    >
    > How good _is_ your crystal ball?
    >


    Surely that's a new (extended warranty) contract ? ;-)


    Richard.
     
    Richard Brooks, Apr 6, 2005
    #5
  6. HC wrote:
    > I'm doing some contract job for a company, writing a web-based application
    > for their staff to use. The fun part is, it'll only ever be used in one
    > browser with one operating system, so I don't need to particularly worry
    > about the user having Javascript disabled or having an old browser. I can
    > use all the fancy tricks I want, and this is a client that likes that.


    I do things like this for a living. It is a lot of fun creating web
    application where you get to determine what the requirements are.

    --
    -=tn=-
     
    Travis Newbury, Apr 6, 2005
    #6
  7. Joel Shepherd wrote:
    >>I'm doing some contract job for a company, writing a web-based application
    >>for their staff to use. The fun part is, it'll only ever be used in one
    >>browser with one operating system, so I don't need to particularly worry
    >>about the user having Javascript disabled or having an old browser. I can
    >>use all the fancy tricks I want, and this is a client that likes that.

    > Out of curiosity, will it still work when -- as inevitable -- they have
    > to upgrade browser and/or O/S?
    > How good _is_ your crystal ball?


    That is irrelevant. It is an application, and they need it today. If
    things change, they upgrade.

    --
    -=tn=-
     
    Travis Newbury, Apr 6, 2005
    #7
  8. HC

    Full name Guest

    On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 05:40:09 GMT, Joel Shepherd <>
    wrote:

    >"HC" <> wrote:
    >
    >> I'm doing some contract job for a company, writing a web-based application
    >> for their staff to use. The fun part is, it'll only ever be used in one
    >> browser with one operating system, so I don't need to particularly worry
    >> about the user having Javascript disabled or having an old browser. I can
    >> use all the fancy tricks I want, and this is a client that likes that.

    >
    >Out of curiosity, will it still work when -- as inevitable -- they have
    >to upgrade browser and/or O/S?
    >
    >How good _is_ your crystal ball?

    Wow! When it comes time to cost for any re-writing to ensure it is
    cross-platform, cross--browser, the OP will be a seller's market.
     
    Full name, Apr 6, 2005
    #8
  9. In article <AuO4e.3532$>,
    Travis Newbury <> wrote:

    > Joel Shepherd wrote:


    > > Out of curiosity, will it still work when -- as inevitable -- they have
    > > to upgrade browser and/or O/S?
    > > How good _is_ your crystal ball?

    >
    > That is irrelevant. It is an application, and they need it today. If
    > things change, they upgrade.


    That's true. Folks usually take in stride little snafus like key
    applications suddenly breaking. Hell, they use Windows, don't they?

    --
    Joel.
     
    Joel Shepherd, Apr 7, 2005
    #9
  10. Joel Shepherd wrote:

    >>That is irrelevant. It is an application, and they need it today. If
    >>things change, they upgrade.


    > That's true. Folks usually take in stride little snafus like key
    > applications suddenly breaking. Hell, they use Windows, don't they?


    Well as back handed as you may have meant it, it is true. Most
    companies don't just switch OS's (or browsers) because of the cost. It
    is usually less expensive (and more efficient) to patch what you already
    have.


    --
    -=tn=-
     
    Travis Newbury, Apr 7, 2005
    #10
  11. Travis Newbury wrote:
    > Joel Shepherd wrote:
    >>>That is irrelevant. It is an application, and they need
    >>>it today. If things change, they upgrade.

    >
    >> That's true. Folks usually take in stride little snafus
    >> like key applications suddenly breaking. Hell, they use
    >> Windows, don't they?

    >
    > Well as back handed as you may have meant it, it is true.
    > Most companies don't just switch OS's (or browsers) because
    > of the cost. It is usually less expensive (and more efficient)
    > to patch what you already have.


    The decision (assuming it is a decision, not just a skills limitation on
    the part of the supplier) to purchase an OS/browser dependent Intranet
    application becomes a decision to make it restrictively expensive to
    switch OS/Browser. Not a problem so long as the OS/Browser supplier
    doesn't decide to take advantage of the situation by increasing the cost
    of using their software up to the point where it is only just less
    expensive to keep using it than to replace it with an alternative.

    There days there isn't a great deal that script enabled IE can do that
    script enabled Mozilla/Gecko cannot also do so there is much less reason
    to be creating new Intranet applications that tie their users into a
    particular OS. Total freedom of browser use on an Intranet probably
    wouldn't ever happen anyway as it would be a nightmare for the
    administrators.

    Richard.
     
    Richard Cornford, Apr 7, 2005
    #11
  12. Richard Cornford wrote:
    > There days there isn't a great deal that script enabled IE can do

    that
    > script enabled Mozilla/Gecko cannot also do so there is much less

    reason
    > to be creating new Intranet applications that tie their users into a
    > particular OS. Total freedom of browser use on an Intranet probably
    > wouldn't ever happen anyway as it would be a nightmare for the
    > administrators.


    With the exception of the need to interact with the visitors computer
    via activeX I agree. (Currently only IE and Netscape 70+ have live
    connect capiblities)

    Most of the applications and training content we do deal with flash
    which is OS independant.

    --
    -=tn=-
     
    Travis Newbury, Apr 7, 2005
    #12
  13. HC

    HC Guest

    > On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 04:09:35 GMT, "HC" <>
    > wrote:
    > : use all the fancy tricks I want, and this is a client that likes that.
    > :
    > : I'm enjoying it :)


    "Sid Ismail" <> wrote
    > OK - I play bridge for that same thrill.
    >
    > Sid


    LOL! :)
     
    HC, Apr 8, 2005
    #13
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