How do you define proficiency in C and C++?

Discussion in 'C++' started by Chandresh, Jan 5, 2007.

  1. Chandresh

    Chandresh Guest

    Hi All,
    I am a graduate student in EE. I have a question that might seem
    unusual but in my opinion it is interesting and I request all experts
    to reply.
    Being a grad student, I came along many programming languages like
    Assembly, C, C++, VHDL, Matlab, Perl etc. and I dont remember how I
    learned them. I am more comfortable with Assembly programming than
    others. The question is how do you measure proficiency in C and C++ ?
    It is important because all employers need proficient C,C++ programmers
    but its hard to know the exact meaning of their proficiency definition.


    My opinion: Programming is closely related to the problem being solved.
    If one can understand the problem in detail and come up with the logic,
    any programming language can implement it. So what is the point in
    asking for proficiency in a particular language?

    Thanks,

    Chandresh
    Chandresh, Jan 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. Chandresh

    Dizzy Guest

    Chandresh wrote:

    > Hi All,
    > I am a graduate student in EE. I have a question that might seem
    > unusual but in my opinion it is interesting and I request all experts
    > to reply.
    > Being a grad student, I came along many programming languages like
    > Assembly, C, C++, VHDL, Matlab, Perl etc. and I dont remember how I
    > learned them. I am more comfortable with Assembly programming than
    > others. The question is how do you measure proficiency in C and C++ ?
    > It is important because all employers need proficient C,C++ programmers
    > but its hard to know the exact meaning of their proficiency definition.
    >

    Good for you.

    >
    > My opinion: Programming is closely related to the problem being solved.
    > If one can understand the problem in detail and come up with the logic,
    > any programming language can implement it. So what is the point in
    > asking for proficiency in a particular language?


    Many reasons, I can think of:

    1. businesses work in teams thus they already have a team of C/C++
    programmers and they need some more people on it

    2. also after some work it is done, a business has to make sure it's
    investment is not lost, a business always presumes it may have to replace
    any employee at any time thus they ask for people that can work in
    languages that they know they can find enough and easy (and "cheap" in
    whatever means they need it) people to be able to continue on the work
    started

    3. because running a business is no exact science I supose many tend to
    apply "common knowledge" either from what they used before or from what
    they know others use thus they tend to go with the "crowd" and use whatever
    popular language exists at that moment (thus implicitely solving the 2
    issues above)

    4. and of course, there may be specific technical requirements (like working
    with existent code they bought or they rent or whatever)

    You seem to think of programming like the act of a lone coder who does some
    project from ground up to it's finnish having exact requirements from
    beginning, having inifinte time and resources. In real life you are not
    (always) alone, you don't have infinite time and resources, you don't have
    all the requirements from beginning, you don't start from 0, you don't get
    to decide the language used and you don't ever finnish working on it
    (usually projects live for a long time needing to satisfy existing
    clients).

    Or maybe I just don't understand your question :)

    --
    Dizzy
    http://dizzy.roedu.net
    Dizzy, Jan 5, 2007
    #2
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  3. Chandresh

    bjeremy Guest

    Chandresh wrote:
    > Hi All,
    > I am a graduate student in EE. I have a question that might seem
    > unusual but in my opinion it is interesting and I request all experts
    > to reply.
    > Being a grad student, I came along many programming languages like
    > Assembly, C, C++, VHDL, Matlab, Perl etc. and I dont remember how I
    > learned them. I am more comfortable with Assembly programming than
    > others. The question is how do you measure proficiency in C and C++ ?
    > It is important because all employers need proficient C,C++ programmers
    > but its hard to know the exact meaning of their proficiency definition.
    >
    >
    > My opinion: Programming is closely related to the problem being solved.
    > If one can understand the problem in detail and come up with the logic,
    > any programming language can implement it. So what is the point in
    > asking for proficiency in a particular language?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >


    You make good points.. but think of it this way. Try thinking in terms
    of proficiency of any language... For me, my first language is English.
    Now I can speak Spanish, but every time I speak Spanish, I need to
    translate back and forth from English in my mind. This and the fact
    that my knowledge of the Spanish vocabulary is limited, makes it
    harder for me to express my thoughts clearly and concisely. So while I
    can get around the streets of Juarez, Mexico, I would not make it as a
    tv anchor on UniVision.

    A programming language is the same way. If you do not know the terms
    and features of a language (syntax an semantics), this makes it more
    difficult for you to express your logic for a program in a way that is
    clear and concise.
    bjeremy, Jan 5, 2007
    #3
  4. Chandresh

    Lionel B Guest

    On Fri, 05 Jan 2007 07:35:58 -0800, Chandresh wrote:

    [snip]

    > My opinion: Programming is closely related to the problem being solved.
    > If one can understand the problem in detail and come up with the logic,
    > any programming language can implement it. So what is the point in
    > asking for proficiency in a particular language?


    I think there tend to be two interlinked scenarios: either someone
    decides (probably on the basis of a variety of factors) which language is
    going to be used for an implementation of the problem and then seeks
    people who (in addition, of course, to understanding the problem) can
    implement it quickly and accurately in the chosen language - that is,
    proficient programmers - or the implementation language may indeed be
    chosen (perhaps partially) on the basis of availability of proficient
    programmers with knowledge of the problem area. I'd say that both
    scenarios are quite common.

    --
    Lionel B
    Lionel B, Jan 5, 2007
    #4
  5. Chandresh

    Chandresh Guest

    Thanks Dizzy, Lionel and Jeremy

    Well, You are absolutely right in saying that real job is different and
    is more demanding thus all your resons are valid. Jermey's example
    shows a perfect analogy. Actually I need to put up the question more
    clearly and I will do that now.

    So as employers are more interested in their business and current
    requirements than trying to judge the candidate on his abilities. I
    would like to know What does it mean by " Proficient in C, C++" ? How
    employers judge a person's capabilities and understanding of C, C++? I
    am more interested in knowing about the pure technical aspects of C,
    C++ programming, I mean symantics, syntax and programming skill test.

    I appreciate your participation and hope I can know important topics to
    know as a proficient C, C++ programmer.

    Thank you,

    Chandresh
    Chandresh, Jan 5, 2007
    #5
  6. Chandresh

    Noah Roberts Guest

    Chandresh wrote:

    > So as employers are more interested in their business and current
    > requirements than trying to judge the candidate on his abilities. I
    > would like to know What does it mean by " Proficient in C, C++" ?


    In my experience, nothing at all. They say that and then you get to
    the interview and they have some product written in Java or C#...or
    Perl...anything but C or C++. Sometimes they even have language
    bigotry against them and try to get into arguments about the benifits
    of Java vs. C++....yeah, it happened to me.

    > How
    > employers judge a person's capabilities and understanding of C, C++?


    By asking stupid and basic questions about C++ or C:

    What is this: while (*d++ = *s++);

    Or stuff that can't be answered:

    Describe the structure of a class...

    You mean how they are commonly laid out in memory?

    No I mean describe the structure of a class.

    Idiotic whiteboard problems that don't tell anyone anything beyond how
    you handle the stress of having to do something stupid in front of a
    panel of judges.

    > I
    > am more interested in knowing about the pure technical aspects of C,
    > C++ programming, I mean symantics, syntax and programming skill test.


    When I do interviews I ask questions about parts of C++ not many people
    know to see if they know it or can figure it out based on what they do
    know or clues I tell them...static vs. dynamic boundary conditions and
    such. Last guy I interviewed showed some tendency toward mathematical
    proofing so I asked him to prove the solution he just wrote on the
    whiteboard...he came back an hour after the interview with some
    scribbles on paper, it wasn't right but the fact that it happened
    impressed me on the spot.

    > I appreciate your participation and hope I can know important topics to
    > know as a proficient C, C++ programmer.
    >
    > Thank you,
    >
    > Chandresh
    Noah Roberts, Jan 5, 2007
    #6
  7. Chandresh wrote:
    > [..]
    > So as employers are more interested in their business and current
    > requirements than trying to judge the candidate on his abilities. I
    > would like to know What does it mean by " Proficient in C, C++" ? How
    > employers judge a person's capabilities and understanding of C, C++? I
    > am more interested in knowing about the pure technical aspects of C,
    > C++ programming, I mean symantics, syntax and programming skill test.
    >
    > I appreciate your participation and hope I can know important topics
    > to know as a proficient C, C++ programmer.


    Proficiency is subjective in the sense that when one is interviewed,
    another, local, "expert" is evaluating one's "proficiency" and gives
    his/her evaluation to the hiring manager.

    I am not putting quotation marks to indicate my doubt or to mock, just
    to assign notations. Generally speaking there can be no "generic
    proficiency", only "proficiency as far as somebody can see". Substitute
    'somebody' with "my local expert" and you get the hiring manager's POV.
    The more people agree on the somebody's point of view, the closer the
    proficiency to its generic form.

    Now, what each of the interviewers ("experts") puts in his/her "C++
    proficiency" criteria is up to them, of course.

    And, sorry to mention this, but this particular subject matter does
    seem off-topic to me.

    V
    --
    Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
    Victor Bazarov, Jan 5, 2007
    #7
  8. bnonaj wrote:
    > Chandresh wrote:
    >> Hi All,
    >> I am a graduate student in EE. I have a question that might seem
    >> unusual but in my opinion it is interesting and I request all experts
    >> to reply.
    >> Being a grad student, I came along many programming languages like
    >> Assembly, C, C++, VHDL, Matlab, Perl etc. and I dont remember how I
    >> learned them. I am more comfortable with Assembly programming than
    >> others. The question is how do you measure proficiency in C and C++ ?
    >> It is important because all employers need proficient C,C++
    >> programmers but its hard to know the exact meaning of their
    >> proficiency definition. My opinion: Programming is closely related to the
    >> problem being
    >> solved. If one can understand the problem in detail and come up with
    >> the logic, any programming language can implement it. So what is the
    >> point in asking for proficiency in a particular language?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Chandresh
    >>

    >
    > A point you've touched on is the type of applications the C++ is to be
    > used for. Hence someone could be well versed in C++, (as I try to be),
    > but without experience of the framework it's to be used within, So I
    > think the answer to your question is that employers nearly always
    > prefer people with the framework experience, (be that Telecoms,
    > embedded, MFC, Finance or Qt, to name a few). Therefore if you've
    > managed to provide a solution in C or C++ within a framework, this is
    > far more valuable than a greater C or C++ proficiency.


    But from two people who possess the same knowledge of the framework,
    the one with higher language proficiency should be prefered, no? So,
    the question still remains, how do you judge the language proficiency?

    Abstract for a moment from all other criteria for hiring (age, race,
    sex, sexual orientation, looks, neatness, body odor, etc.) and try to
    imagine the two candidates who are perfect clones of each other in all
    aspects but the knowledge of the programming language. How do you
    figure it?

    V
    --
    Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
    Victor Bazarov, Jan 5, 2007
    #8
  9. Chandresh

    bnonaj Guest

    Chandresh wrote:
    > Hi All,
    > I am a graduate student in EE. I have a question that might seem
    > unusual but in my opinion it is interesting and I request all experts
    > to reply.
    > Being a grad student, I came along many programming languages like
    > Assembly, C, C++, VHDL, Matlab, Perl etc. and I dont remember how I
    > learned them. I am more comfortable with Assembly programming than
    > others. The question is how do you measure proficiency in C and C++ ?
    > It is important because all employers need proficient C,C++ programmers
    > but its hard to know the exact meaning of their proficiency definition.
    >
    >
    > My opinion: Programming is closely related to the problem being solved.
    > If one can understand the problem in detail and come up with the logic,
    > any programming language can implement it. So what is the point in
    > asking for proficiency in a particular language?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Chandresh
    >


    A point you've touched on is the type of applications the C++ is to be
    used for. Hence someone could be well versed in C++, (as I try to be),
    but without experience of the framework it's to be used within, So I
    think the answer to your question is that employers nearly always prefer
    people with the framework experience, (be that Telecoms, embedded, MFC,
    Finance or Qt, to name a few). Therefore if you've managed to provide a
    solution in C or C++ within a framework, this is far more valuable than
    a greater C or C++ proficiency.

    JB
    bnonaj, Jan 5, 2007
    #9
  10. Chandresh

    Chandresh Guest

    Thanks everyone,

    Let me make it more specific. I think I can program well for any given
    problem ( as everybody does!!) but I am not confident about the use of
    C++ and my take more time for me to do something in C++. So Eventhough
    I am a good programmer bcoz of less familiarity with C++ I feel guilty
    to sell myself as an efficient C++ programmer. I understand that real
    programming job has less to do with the interview question but still
    its important. What are the core concepts, syntax and symantics that I
    must know in detail?

    If anybody feels that its an old topic, It may be for them and I am
    sorry for that but for me its a great thing to learn from experienced
    people like you.

    Thank you,
    Chandresh
    Chandresh, Jan 5, 2007
    #10
  11. Chandresh wrote:
    > Let me make it more specific. I think I can program well for any given
    > problem ( as everybody does!!) but I am not confident about the use of
    > C++ and my take more time for me to do something in C++. So Eventhough
    > I am a good programmer bcoz of less familiarity with C++ I feel guilty
    > to sell myself as an efficient C++ programmer. I understand that real
    > programming job has less to do with the interview question but still
    > its important. What are the core concepts, syntax and symantics that I
    > must know in detail?


    If you can understand (and explain to somebody who knows less that you)
    every code example in, say, "Thinking in C++" or "Accelerated C++", you
    know enough C++. Now, how that translates into a list of core concepts,
    syntax, and semantics, I am not sure. Nor am I going to attempt to make
    such a list. That's what the books are for.

    > [..]


    V
    --
    Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
    Victor Bazarov, Jan 5, 2007
    #11
  12. Chandresh

    bjeremy Guest

    Chandresh wrote:
    > Thanks everyone,
    >
    > Let me make it more specific. I think I can program well for any given
    > problem ( as everybody does!!) but I am not confident about the use of
    > C++ and my take more time for me to do something in C++. So Eventhough
    > I am a good programmer bcoz of less familiarity with C++ I feel guilty
    > to sell myself as an efficient C++ programmer. I understand that real
    > programming job has less to do with the interview question but still
    > its important. What are the core concepts, syntax and symantics that I
    > must know in detail?
    >
    > If anybody feels that its an old topic, It may be for them and I am
    > sorry for that but for me its a great thing to learn from experienced
    > people like you.
    >
    > Thank you,
    > Chandresh


    You C++ education starts here:
    http://www.parashift.com/c -faq-lite/index.html
    bjeremy, Jan 5, 2007
    #12
  13. Victor Bazarov wrote:
    > try to
    > imagine the two candidates who are perfect clones of each other in all
    > aspects but the knowledge of the programming language. How do you
    > figure it?


    I ask them to tell me what C++ or programming books they have read
    recently, and we discuss a book or two. I also find that most C++
    candidates have never heard of the standard template library. (!)

    --
    Scott McPhillips [VC++ MVP]
    Scott McPhillips [MVP], Jan 5, 2007
    #13
  14. Scott McPhillips [MVP] wrote:
    > Victor Bazarov wrote:
    >> try to
    >> imagine the two candidates who are perfect clones of each other in
    >> all aspects but the knowledge of the programming language. How do
    >> you figure it?

    >
    > I ask them to tell me what C++ or programming books they have read
    > recently, and we discuss a book or two. I also find that most C++
    > candidates have never heard of the standard template library. (!)


    .... which is probably because it's an obsolete term. STL is what HP
    came out with, before it was standardised. SGI still releases STL,
    but it's their implementation of it original stuff amended to reflect
    the standardised portions, and not many folks use custom-implemented
    standard library elements, most simply use what comes with their
    compiler.

    V
    --
    Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
    Victor Bazarov, Jan 5, 2007
    #14
  15. Chandresh

    David Guest

    Hello Chandresh,

    On Fri, 5 Jan 2007 15:35:58 UTC, "Chandresh" <> wrote:

    > Hi All,
    > I am a graduate student in EE. I have a question that might seem
    > unusual but in my opinion it is interesting and I request all experts
    > to reply.
    > Being a grad student, I came along many programming languages like
    > Assembly, C, C++, VHDL, Matlab, Perl etc. and I dont remember how I
    > learned them. I am more comfortable with Assembly programming than
    > others. The question is how do you measure proficiency in C and C++ ?
    > It is important because all employers need proficient C,C++ programmers
    > but its hard to know the exact meaning of their proficiency definition.
    >
    >
    > My opinion: Programming is closely related to the problem being solved.
    > If one can understand the problem in detail and come up with the logic,
    > any programming language can implement it. So what is the point in
    > asking for proficiency in a particular language?


    Each language has its expressiveness, common tools, and pitfalls.
    Proficiency in a language means that you are familar with what
    the language can do and can think and work with people in that
    language. At least that is a start.

    I've also seen people that know a language but still can't put
    the concepts together to solve a problem. Sometimes specific
    knowledge is required to solve a probem, but I think most
    people have trouble with putting together larger projects.
    Perhaps my problem is that I deal so well at all levels that
    there isn't anything really new anymore. It is all simple.
    My downfall tendancy is to resist change when it isn't needed.

    > Thanks,
    >
    > Chandresh


    David
    David, Jan 6, 2007
    #15
  16. Chandresh

    r Guest

    Chandresh wrote:
    > Hi All,
    > I am a graduate student in EE. I have a question that might seem
    > unusual but in my opinion it is interesting and I request all experts
    > to reply.
    > Being a grad student, I came along many programming languages like
    > Assembly, C, C++, VHDL, Matlab, Perl etc. and I dont remember how I
    > learned them. I am more comfortable with Assembly programming than
    > others. The question is how do you measure proficiency in C and C++ ?
    > It is important because all employers need proficient C,C++ programmers
    > but its hard to know the exact meaning of their proficiency definition.
    >
    >
    > My opinion: Programming is closely related to the problem being solved.
    > If one can understand the problem in detail and come up with the logic,
    > any programming language can implement it. So what is the point in
    > asking for proficiency in a particular language?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Chandresh


    I would say if you have successfully written programs in C++, using
    with understanding all the paradigms offered by the language (not
    necessarily in the same program :), and in the spirit of C++, i.e.
    with efficiency, you are considered proficient.

    An employer's definition of proficiency is something else. If the
    employer is doing something like web development where C++ is not
    really apropriate then the requirement "proficient in C++" was just for
    kicks.
    r, Jan 6, 2007
    #16
  17. Chandresh

    bnonaj Guest

    Victor Bazarov wrote:
    > bnonaj wrote:
    >> Chandresh wrote:
    >>> Hi All,
    >>> I am a graduate student in EE. I have a question that might seem
    >>> unusual but in my opinion it is interesting and I request all experts
    >>> to reply.
    >>> Being a grad student, I came along many programming languages like
    >>> Assembly, C, C++, VHDL, Matlab, Perl etc. and I dont remember how I
    >>> learned them. I am more comfortable with Assembly programming than
    >>> others. The question is how do you measure proficiency in C and C++ ?
    >>> It is important because all employers need proficient C,C++
    >>> programmers but its hard to know the exact meaning of their
    >>> proficiency definition. My opinion: Programming is closely related to the
    >>> problem being
    >>> solved. If one can understand the problem in detail and come up with
    >>> the logic, any programming language can implement it. So what is the
    >>> point in asking for proficiency in a particular language?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>>
    >>> Chandresh
    >>>

    >> A point you've touched on is the type of applications the C++ is to be
    >> used for. Hence someone could be well versed in C++, (as I try to be),
    >> but without experience of the framework it's to be used within, So I
    >> think the answer to your question is that employers nearly always
    >> prefer people with the framework experience, (be that Telecoms,
    >> embedded, MFC, Finance or Qt, to name a few). Therefore if you've
    >> managed to provide a solution in C or C++ within a framework, this is
    >> far more valuable than a greater C or C++ proficiency.

    >
    > But from two people who possess the same knowledge of the framework,
    > the one with higher language proficiency should be prefered, no? So,
    > the question still remains, how do you judge the language proficiency?
    >
    > Abstract for a moment from all other criteria for hiring (age, race,
    > sex, sexual orientation, looks, neatness, body odor, etc.) and try to
    > imagine the two candidates who are perfect clones of each other in all
    > aspects but the knowledge of the programming language. How do you
    > figure it?
    >
    > V

    Victor,

    I'm just not that perfect for the abstraction you're considering, and
    I pretty certain nobody else could satisfy that level of abstraction.
    So, unless a partial creature can create a totally impartial system, the
    question is probably a matter for philosophy, and as you've already
    pointed out, this is off topic.

    while (u & i != the_ideal)
    {
    out_bin << off_topic;
    newsgroup_io << cplusplus_query;
    newsgroup_io >> cplusplus_answer;
    }

    JB
    bnonaj, Jan 6, 2007
    #17
  18. Chandresh

    Noah Roberts Guest

    r wrote:

    > I would say if you have successfully written programs in C++, using
    > with understanding all the paradigms offered by the language (not
    > necessarily in the same program :), and in the spirit of C++, i.e.
    > with efficiency, you are considered proficient.


    No, you are considered God. Only God has infinite time and memory
    storage to learn and use the unbounded set of paradigms available in
    C++.
    Noah Roberts, Jan 6, 2007
    #18
  19. bnonaj wrote:
    > Victor Bazarov wrote:
    >> [..]
    >> Abstract for a moment from all other criteria for hiring (age, race,
    >> sex, sexual orientation, looks, neatness, body odor, etc.) and try to
    >> imagine the two candidates who are perfect clones of each other in
    >> all aspects but the knowledge of the programming language. How do
    >> you figure it?
    >>
    >> V

    > Victor,
    >
    > I'm just not that perfect for the abstraction you're considering,
    > and I pretty certain nobody else could satisfy that level of
    > abstraction. So, unless a partial creature can create a totally
    > impartial system, the question is probably a matter for philosophy,
    > and as you've already pointed out, this is off topic.


    My point was to explain the request, while you (validly, no doubt)
    argue that in the real world answering the proficiency question has
    very little value by itself. You're right, generally, but that's
    not the end of it. FWIW, the application _can_ be pure C++ language.
    Imagine a company that publishes an implementation of the library.
    They need somebody who knows C++ and that's the most important
    criterion for them.

    V
    --
    Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
    Victor Bazarov, Jan 6, 2007
    #19
  20. Chandresh

    blytkerchan Guest

    bjeremy wrote:
    > Chandresh wrote:
    > > Hi All,
    > > I am a graduate student in EE. I have a question that might seem
    > > unusual but in my opinion it is interesting and I request all experts
    > > to reply.
    > > Being a grad student, I came along many programming languages like
    > > Assembly, C, C++, VHDL, Matlab, Perl etc. and I dont remember how I
    > > learned them. I am more comfortable with Assembly programming than
    > > others. The question is how do you measure proficiency in C and C++ ?
    > > It is important because all employers need proficient C,C++ programmers
    > > but its hard to know the exact meaning of their proficiency definition.
    > >
    > >
    > > My opinion: Programming is closely related to the problem being solved.
    > > If one can understand the problem in detail and come up with the logic,
    > > any programming language can implement it. So what is the point in
    > > asking for proficiency in a particular language?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >

    >
    > You make good points.. but think of it this way. Try thinking in terms
    > of proficiency of any language... For me, my first language is English.
    > Now I can speak Spanish, but every time I speak Spanish, I need to
    > translate back and forth from English in my mind. This and the fact
    > that my knowledge of the Spanish vocabulary is limited, makes it
    > harder for me to express my thoughts clearly and concisely. So while I
    > can get around the streets of Juarez, Mexico, I would not make it as a
    > tv anchor on UniVision.
    >
    > A programming language is the same way. If you do not know the terms
    > and features of a language (syntax an semantics), this makes it more
    > difficult for you to express your logic for a program in a way that is
    > clear and concise.

    I don't agree on the parallel : my first language is dutch but I speak
    both english and french fluently as well. In fact, due to where I live
    and work (or rather: who I live and work with) I have to speak french
    every day, all day. I therefore no longer "translate" in my mind, but
    rather swap languages: as I am typing this in english, I am in an
    "english mode" if you will (and yes, the brain does work a bit like
    that).

    Same thing for C++ vs. other programming languages: if you are forced
    to use more than one language on a daily basis, you won't have to
    translate from one to another. For example: I usually code in C++,
    which is close to my "native" language where programming is concerned.
    If I have to code anything in Java, the "translation" bit comes in,
    just like if I'd have to speak german. If I have to code in C, a
    different part of my brain seems to kick in (even my coding style
    changes in C) but there's no translation going on.

    Hence, IMHO, proficiency is not a question simply of knowledge, but
    also of habit (being used to working in a language) and context
    (getting the right stimuli to swap your proficiency from your hard disk
    into live memory, so to speak).

    rlc
    blytkerchan, Jan 8, 2007
    #20
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