HTML book recomendation

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Jud McCranie, Nov 29, 2007.

  1. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    I'm seeking a recommendation for a simple HTML book. One that doesn't
    get into it too deeply. I know just a little about HTML. I was
    considering these:

    1. HTML for Dummies - but it got some poor reviews
    2. HTML & XHTML: The Definite Guide
    3. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML

    The last two are O'Riley books. From what I've read, I'm leaning
    toward #3. Does anyone have a recommendation?
    --
    Replace you know what by j to email
    Jud McCranie, Nov 29, 2007
    #1
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  2. Jud McCranie wrote:
    > I'm seeking a recommendation for a simple HTML book. One that doesn't
    > get into it too deeply. I know just a little about HTML. I was
    > considering these:
    >
    > 1. HTML for Dummies - but it got some poor reviews
    > 2. HTML & XHTML: The Definite Guide
    > 3. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML
    >
    > The last two are O'Riley books. From what I've read, I'm leaning
    > toward #3. Does anyone have a recommendation?


    If you want a quick start to get going with correct information (most
    out there is either obsolete or just plain wrong), then try the
    tutorials at www.htmldog.com

    After completion of those tutorials, #1 will be not needed, and you will
    know what is applicable and what is not (e.g, XHTML) with #2 & #3.


    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
    Jonathan N. Little, Nov 29, 2007
    #2
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  3. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    On Wed, 28 Nov 2007 23:11:33 -0500, "Jonathan N. Little"
    <> wrote:

    >If you want a quick start to get going with correct information (most
    >out there is either obsolete or just plain wrong), then try the
    >tutorials at www.htmldog.com


    Thanks, I'll look at that, but I prefer physical books because I can
    take them with me, make notes in the margins, etc.
    --
    Replace you know what by j to email
    Jud McCranie, Nov 29, 2007
    #3
  4. Jud McCranie

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Jud McCranie <> wrote:

    > On Wed, 28 Nov 2007 23:11:33 -0500, "Jonathan N. Little"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >If you want a quick start to get going with correct information (most
    > >out there is either obsolete or just plain wrong), then try the
    > >tutorials at www.htmldog.com

    >
    > Thanks, I'll look at that, but I prefer physical books because I can
    > take them with me, make notes in the margins, etc.


    Time maybe to get the printer firing...

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Nov 29, 2007
    #4
  5. Jud McCranie

    David Segall Guest

    Jud McCranie <> wrote:

    >I'm seeking a recommendation for a simple HTML book. One that doesn't
    >get into it too deeply. I know just a little about HTML. I was
    >considering these:
    >
    >1. HTML for Dummies - but it got some poor reviews
    >2. HTML & XHTML: The Definite Guide
    >3. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML

    I like "The Definitive Guide" series. I also have the CSS and
    JavaScript volumes. In addition to providing clear training in the
    topics they remain very useful as reference manuals.
    David Segall, Nov 29, 2007
    #5
  6. Jud McCranie

    Nik Coughlin Guest

    "Jud McCranie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm seeking a recommendation for a simple HTML book. One that doesn't
    > get into it too deeply. I know just a little about HTML. I was
    > considering these:
    >
    > 1. HTML for Dummies - but it got some poor reviews
    > 2. HTML & XHTML: The Definite Guide
    > 3. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML
    >
    > The last two are O'Riley books. From what I've read, I'm leaning
    > toward #3. Does anyone have a recommendation?


    I have another Head First book, I remember when I first read it I thought it
    was one of the best technical books I'd ever read (Head First Design
    Patterns). If the HTML one is anywhere near as good then it's probably
    awesome.
    Nik Coughlin, Nov 29, 2007
    #6
  7. Jud McCranie

    mark4asp Guest

    On Wed, 28 Nov 2007 22:31:36 -0500, Jud McCranie
    <> wrote:

    >I'm seeking a recommendation for a simple HTML book. One that doesn't
    >get into it too deeply. I know just a little about HTML. I was
    >considering these:
    >
    >1. HTML for Dummies - but it got some poor reviews
    >2. HTML & XHTML: The Definite Guide
    >3. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML
    >
    >The last two are O'Riley books. From what I've read, I'm leaning
    >toward #3. Does anyone have a recommendation?


    I agree with the other commentators. Only #2 above will be a good
    reference after you've finished reading the book. Read the others if
    you want to but get them from the library rather than pay. Given the
    price of technical books it's a real shame to spend so much money on
    something you throw away after reading.

    * A nice css book is Wrox press "Beginning CSS", by Richard York - it's
    suitable for all, from beginners to experienced coders, like me, who've
    never before taken the time to learn css because they considered it too
    easy or below them! It's full of gems and useful detailed information
    which I wish I'd read years ago as well as being a great reference on
    css.

    * "Accessible XHTML and CSS Web Sites", also published by Wrox is a nice
    book too, but it may not be strictly a beginner's book.

    * I use Danny Goodman's "DHTML - The Definitive Reference" which I can't
    recommend for you because it's way OTT; it's a reference not a tutorial
    and covers stuff you probably don't want to know. Essential reference
    book for advanced coders though.

    Sorry I can't recommend a beginner's html book but I've never read one.
    That "Beginning Css" would definitely be worth it for you. A book I
    used to swear by was Jennifer Niederst's "Web Design in a Nutshell",
    which is really a book for web coders - not a "design" book and it may
    be showing it's age now even if it is in its 3rd edition.
    mark4asp, Nov 29, 2007
    #7
  8. Jud McCranie wrote:
    > I'm seeking a recommendation for a simple HTML book. One that doesn't
    > get into it too deeply. I know just a little about HTML. I was
    > considering these:
    >
    > 1. HTML for Dummies - but it got some poor reviews


    I'm sure it would here, too.

    > 2. HTML & XHTML: The Definite Guide
    > 3. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML
    >
    > The last two are O'Riley books. From what I've read, I'm leaning
    > toward #3. Does anyone have a recommendation?


    If you mean "O'Reilly", they're excellent. I have a whole shelf of them
    here and they've never disappointed me.

    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project - http://improve-usenet.org
    Blinky the Shark, Nov 29, 2007
    #8
  9. Jud McCranie wrote:
    > Jonathan N. Little wrote:
    >
    >> www.htmldog.com

    >
    > Thanks, I'll look at that, but I prefer physical books because I can
    > take them with me, make notes in the margins, etc.


    There is an HTMLDog book available -- see the website.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    [Geek of HTML/SQL/Perl/PHP/Python/Apache/Linux]
    [OS: Linux 2.6.17.14-mm-desktop-9mdvsmp, up 4 days, 16:11.]
    [Now Playing: Badly Drawn Boy - A Peak You Reach]

    Sharing Music with Apple iTunes
    http://tobyinkster.co.uk/blog/2007/11/28/itunes-sharing/
    Toby A Inkster, Nov 29, 2007
    #9
  10. Jud McCranie

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 29 Nov, 03:31, Jud McCranie <>
    wrote:

    > Does anyone have a recommendation?


    > 3. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML


    Follow it up with Lie & Bos' "Cascading Style Sheets" - that's also
    one you'll keep on your desktop as a reference afterwards
    Andy Dingley, Nov 29, 2007
    #10
  11. Jud McCranie

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 29 Nov, 04:11, "Jonathan N. Little" <> wrote:

    > > 2. HTML & XHTML: The Definite Guide
    > > 3. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML


    > After completion of those tutorials, #1 will be not needed, and you will
    > know what is applicable and what is not (e.g, XHTML) with #2 & #3.


    Or just read #3. One of the nice things about it is its appropriate
    treatment of XHTML.
    Andy Dingley, Nov 29, 2007
    #11
  12. Jud McCranie

    SAZ Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > I'm seeking a recommendation for a simple HTML book. One that doesn't
    > get into it too deeply. I know just a little about HTML. I was
    > considering these:
    >
    > 1. HTML for Dummies - but it got some poor reviews
    > 2. HTML & XHTML: The Definite Guide
    > 3. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML
    >
    > The last two are O'Riley books. From what I've read, I'm leaning
    > toward #3. Does anyone have a recommendation?
    >

    You can't go wrong with any O'Reilly book.
    SAZ, Nov 29, 2007
    #12
  13. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    On Thu, 29 Nov 2007 15:42:16 +1100, dorayme
    <> wrote:

    >Time maybe to get the printer firing...


    A bunch of unbound, single-sided sheets is not a good solution.
    --
    Replace you know what by j to email
    Jud McCranie, Nov 30, 2007
    #13
  14. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    On 29 Nov 2007 08:28:57 GMT, Blinky the Shark <>
    wrote:

    >If you mean "O'Reilly", they're excellent.


    Yes, I can't spell.
    --
    Replace you know what by j to email
    Jud McCranie, Nov 30, 2007
    #14
  15. Jud McCranie

    Ed Mullen Guest

    Jud McCranie wrote:
    > On Thu, 29 Nov 2007 15:42:16 +1100, dorayme
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Time maybe to get the printer firing...

    >
    > A bunch of unbound, single-sided sheets is not a good solution.


    !!! So print the odd pages first, turn them over and re-insert into the
    printer, print the even pages. And then invest in a thing called a
    "stapler." Geez.

    --
    Ed Mullen
    http://edmullen.net
    http://mozilla.edmullen.net
    http://abington.edmullen.net
    "Disgruntled?" If I'm not, then I guess I'm "gruntled." What the heck
    is "gruntled?"
    Ed Mullen, Nov 30, 2007
    #15
  16. Jud McCranie

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Jud McCranie <> wrote:

    > On Thu, 29 Nov 2007 15:42:16 +1100, dorayme
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >Time maybe to get the printer firing...

    >
    > A bunch of unbound, single-sided sheets is not a good solution.


    Fair enough, but remember the revolution the computer brought in,
    especially with the Mac, called Desktop Publishing? There would
    be ways to print both sides, or in landscape and ready to bind
    for yourself. You could make up your book to suit your interests
    and knowledge. Why, you could even index it specially.

    Me, I don't bother. I like single loose sheets. Advantages:

    (1) Print what you want

    (2) Print in a font and size comfortable to you

    (3) Lighter to hold one page at a time lying back somewhere like
    on a beach, under a nice tree, on a couch or bed. Don't staple
    together.

    (4) When you have gotten all you are likely to get from the
    pages, you can put them through the printer again and on the
    backs, print sudokus or 'chess mates in 2' (or 3 or 4). You get
    to throw them into the recycle after solving the backs. Other
    humans get to read things on molecules that have some done some
    good in the world.

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Nov 30, 2007
    #16
  17. Jud McCranie

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Ed Mullen <> wrote:

    > Jud McCranie wrote:
    > > On Thu, 29 Nov 2007 15:42:16 +1100, dorayme
    > > <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Time maybe to get the printer firing...

    > >
    > > A bunch of unbound, single-sided sheets is not a good solution.

    >
    > !!! So print the odd pages first, turn them over and re-insert into the
    > printer, print the even pages. And then invest in a thing called a
    > "stapler." Geez.


    Someone gave me a stapleless staple one Xmas. Silly thing really,
    it sort of cleverly punches a hole and folds the bits so the
    pages stick together. I gave it as a present the next year to
    someone else. It is not as robust as metal ones.

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Nov 30, 2007
    #17
  18. Jud McCranie

    Ed Mullen Guest

    dorayme wrote:
    > backs, print sudokus or 'chess mates in 2' (or 3 or 4). You get
    > to throw them into the recycle after solving the backs. Other
    > humans get to read things on molecules that have some done some
    > good in the world.


    I tried to read molecules once but my eye doctor told me my arms weren't
    long enough any more.

    --
    Ed Mullen
    http://edmullen.net
    http://mozilla.edmullen.net
    http://abington.edmullen.net
    Inventions have long since reached their limit, and I see no hope for
    further developments. - Roman engineer Julius Sextus Frontinus, A.D. 10.
    Everything that can be invented has been invented. - Charles H. Duell,
    Commissioner, U.S. Office of Patents, 1899.
    All the easy stuff's already been invented. - my brother-in-law, PhD. in
    physics, 1988
    Ed Mullen, Nov 30, 2007
    #18
  19. Jud McCranie

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 29 Nov, 17:32, SAZ <> wrote:

    > You can't go wrong with any O'Reilly book.


    Well you certainly _can_, including almost anything with an animal
    cover that they've published in the last few years. The days when
    O'Reillys could automatically be assumed to be worth reading were over
    some time ago.

    Fortunately the Head First series are a return to form (albeit a
    slightly unusual heavily-tutorial form that doesn't even try to be an
    ongoing reference). I've also heard good things about the recent ones
    with coloured prints of animals as covers.
    Andy Dingley, Nov 30, 2007
    #19
  20. Jud McCranie

    DocuMaker Guest

    If you're looking for introductory content, you can never go wrong
    with the dummies series.

    ---
    http://www.outsource2documaker.com
    Managing outsourced projects ranging from fine artwork and business
    graphics to website design and maintenance.


    On Nov 28, 7:31 pm, Jud McCranie <>
    wrote:
    > I'm seeking a recommendation for a simple HTML book. One that doesn't
    > get into it too deeply. I know just a little about HTML. I was
    > considering these:
    >
    > 1. HTML for Dummies - but it got some poor reviews
    > 2. HTML & XHTML: The Definite Guide
    > 3. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML
    >
    > The last two are O'Riley books. From what I've read, I'm leaning
    > toward #3. Does anyone have a recommendation?
    > --
    > Replace you know what by j to email
    DocuMaker, Dec 3, 2007
    #20
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