Hyperlinks With No Underlining

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Gillian White, Jun 7, 2004.

  1. I would like to know how to create a hyperlink where the text does not show
    as being underlined. I've seen great examples of this on the Wikipedia
    website, but the source gives no indication as to how it is done.

    Can anyone help?

    Gillian
    Gillian White, Jun 7, 2004
    #1
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  2. Gillian White

    Neal Guest

    On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 01:03:41 GMT, Gillian White
    <> wrote:

    > I would like to know how to create a hyperlink where the text does not
    > show
    > as being underlined. I've seen great examples of this on the Wikipedia
    > website, but the source gives no indication as to how it is done.
    >
    > Can anyone help?
    >
    > Gillian


    Before you do this, realize that by removing the underline you remove the
    most common way people recognize a link as a link. So only do this in a
    clearly-marked navigation section, where it's obvious that everything is a
    link. Never do this with "inline" links.

    The solution is using CSS.

    a:link {text-decoration: none}
    Neal, Jun 7, 2004
    #2
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  3. "Neal" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...

    > Before you do this, realize that by removing the underline you remove the
    > most common way people recognize a link as a link. So only do this in a
    > clearly-marked navigation section, where it's obvious that everything is a
    > link. Never do this with "inline" links.


    It's for a private website that only I can access, so I don't have to worry
    about confusing other people :)

    > a:link {text-decoration: none}


    That worked beautifully. Thanks!

    Gillian
    Gillian White, Jun 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Gillian White

    DU Guest

    Neal wrote:

    > On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 01:03:41 GMT, Gillian White
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> I would like to know how to create a hyperlink where the text does not
    >> show
    >> as being underlined. I've seen great examples of this on the Wikipedia
    >> website, but the source gives no indication as to how it is done.
    >>
    >> Can anyone help?
    >>
    >> Gillian

    >
    >
    > Before you do this, realize that by removing the underline you remove
    > the most common way people recognize a link as a link.



    I don't understand why you would suggest that he could do this in the
    first place when the user should choose how he best wants to/can
    recognize links.

    In MSIE:
    Tools/Internet Options.../Advanced tab/Browsing section/Underlining
    links/Always-Hover-Never radio buttons

    In Mozilla-based browsers and NS 7.x:
    Edit/Preferences.../Appearance category/Colors/Links Colors/Underline
    links checkbox

    In Opera 7.x:
    Tools/Preferences...Alt+P/Page Style/Link Style/My Link Style/Not
    visited and Visited links checkboxes

    I don't agree that underlining links is the most common way to recognize
    a link as a link; at least, I don't believe it is the most important
    visual feedback to identify them. Text browsers (at least Lynx 2.8.5) do
    not underline links: color of links, when they contrast clearly from
    non-link text, is much more important.
    Underlining links also can make accesskey in links much more difficult
    to figure out when identifying accesskeys widely uses underlying.

    DU

    So only do this
    > in a clearly-marked navigation section, where it's obvious that
    > everything is a link. Never do this with "inline" links.
    >
    > The solution is using CSS.
    >
    > a:link {text-decoration: none}
    DU, Jun 7, 2004
    #4
  5. Gillian White

    Karl Groves Guest

    "DU" <> wrote in message
    news:ca0kmd$gdn$...
    > Neal wrote:
    >
    > > On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 01:03:41 GMT, Gillian White
    > > <> wrote:


    > I don't understand why you would suggest that he could do this in the
    > first place when the user should choose how he best wants to/can
    > recognize links.


    <snip examples>

    You are, of course, assuming that the average user knows how to modify their
    browser's settings.
    They do not

    > I don't agree that underlining links is the most common way to recognize
    > a link as a link; at least, I don't believe it is the most important
    > visual feedback to identify them.


    I do.
    I've seen users in usability tests click on *anything* that was underlined.
    This includes black-on-white text where the actual links were blue/
    underlined and the underlined text was black. The underline, to them,
    represented a link.

    -Karl
    Karl Groves, Jun 7, 2004
    #5
  6. Karl Groves wrote:
    > "DU" <> wrote in message
    >
    >> I don't agree that underlining links is the most common way to
    >> recognize a link as a link; at least, I don't believe it is the most
    >> important visual feedback to identify them.

    >
    > I do.
    > I've seen users in usability tests click on *anything* that was
    > underlined. This includes black-on-white text where the actual links
    > were blue/ underlined and the underlined text was black. The
    > underline, to them, represented a link.
    >
    > -Karl


    .... and an image? When would one expect an image to have a link on it?
    Underlined? Bordered? HandCursor? "Click Here" alt text?
    Disco Octopus, Jun 7, 2004
    #6
  7. Gillian White

    Whitecrest Guest

    In article <N9Pwc.687282$oR5.683777@pd7tw3no>,
    says...
    > I would like to know how to create a hyperlink where the text does not show
    > as being underlined. I've seen great examples of this on the Wikipedia
    > website, but the source gives no indication as to how it is done.


    <a style="text-deceration:none" href="blalba" atl="bla bla bla">some
    link</a>

    but use it wisely, Most people know a link is underlined.
    --
    Whitecrest Entertainment
    www.whitecrestent.com
    Whitecrest, Jun 7, 2004
    #7
  8. Gillian White

    Whitecrest Guest

    In article <jmSwc.76$>,
    says...
    > ... and an image? When would one expect an image to have a link on it?
    > Underlined? Bordered? HandCursor? "Click Here" alt text?


    Think about it. When do YOU think there is a link on an image?

    --
    Whitecrest Entertainment
    www.whitecrestent.com
    Whitecrest, Jun 7, 2004
    #8
  9. Gillian White

    Els Guest

    Whitecrest wrote:

    > In article <jmSwc.76$>,
    > says...
    >
    >>... and an image? When would one expect an image to have a link on it?
    >>Underlined? Bordered? HandCursor? "Click Here" alt text?

    >
    > Think about it. When do YOU think there is a link on an image?


    I'm afraid that doesn't work for everybody.
    Friend of mine only recently discovered that not every
    visitor is waving their mouse over the page, thus
    discovering the images are links.

    To answer the question for myself: I think an image is a
    link when it is in a place I would expect it to link, like
    in a thumbnail gallery, or when it has a caption below it
    that indicates a subject which isn't covered there and then.
    That's when I hover over it, and by the HandCursor I see if
    I was assuming correctly. But when it stays an arrow, I'm
    usually really surprised. And that's when I see the text
    link below it. Even if it's underlined, I try the picture first.

    --
    Els
    http://locusmeus.com/
    Sonhos vem. Sonhos vão. O resto é imperfeito.
    - Renato Russo -
    Els, Jun 7, 2004
    #9
  10. Gillian White

    Karl Groves Guest

    "Disco Octopus" <> wrote in message
    news:jmSwc.76$...
    > Karl Groves wrote:
    > > "DU" <> wrote in message
    > >
    > >> I don't agree that underlining links is the most common way to
    > >> recognize a link as a link; at least, I don't believe it is the most
    > >> important visual feedback to identify them.

    > >
    > > I do.
    > > I've seen users in usability tests click on *anything* that was
    > > underlined. This includes black-on-white text where the actual links
    > > were blue/ underlined and the underlined text was black. The
    > > underline, to them, represented a link.
    > >
    > > -Karl

    >
    > ... and an image? When would one expect an image to have a link on it?
    > Underlined? Bordered? HandCursor? "Click Here" alt text?


    As the saying goes, "That opens up a completely different can of worms"
    It depends on the image and it depends on the context in which it is being
    used and it also depends on a ton of other things such as size and
    placement.
    I've seen users in tests randomly clicking on almost every image they see!

    -Karl
    Karl Groves, Jun 7, 2004
    #10
  11. Gillian White

    Els Guest

    Karl Groves wrote:

    > "DU" <> wrote in message
    > news:ca0kmd$gdn$...
    >
    >>I don't agree that underlining links is the most common way to recognize
    >>a link as a link; at least, I don't believe it is the most important
    >>visual feedback to identify them.

    >
    > I do.
    > I've seen users in usability tests click on *anything* that was underlined.
    > This includes black-on-white text where the actual links were blue/
    > underlined and the underlined text was black. The underline, to them,
    > represented a link.


    I agree that the underlining clearly represents a link, but
    the other way round I think it is different.
    If there are no underlined pieces of text on the page at
    all, neither links nor other text, I think the difference in
    colour gives away what is a link and what not.

    Do you know of any tests that looked at that?

    --
    Els
    http://locusmeus.com/
    Sonhos vem. Sonhos vão. O resto é imperfeito.
    - Renato Russo -
    Els, Jun 7, 2004
    #11
  12. Gillian White

    Neal Guest

    On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 13:10:09 +0200, Els <> wrote:


    > I agree that the underlining clearly represents a link, but the other
    > way round I think it is different.
    > If there are no underlined pieces of text on the page at all, neither
    > links nor other text, I think the difference in colour gives away what
    > is a link and what not.


    Though we are assuming the monitor displays in color (or the eyeball sees
    color) - which might seem a safe assumption but is not as safe as keeping
    the underlines.

    Going back a few messages - regarding alternate browsers like Lynx, the
    stylesheet is not used so there's no problem. If users have modified their
    browsers to change link appearance, they know what they have done; if not,
    they rely on standard visual cues.

    And access keys are a pain - but overlining the letter associated with the
    accesskey might be a successful strategy there. We don't want to make the
    page bad for some users, and we don't want fixes for some users to make
    the page bad for everyone else either.
    Neal, Jun 7, 2004
    #12
  13. Gillian White

    Whitecrest Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > >>... and an image? When would one expect an image to have a link on it?
    > >>Underlined? Bordered? HandCursor? "Click Here" alt text?

    > > Think about it. When do YOU think there is a link on an image?

    > I'm afraid that doesn't work for everybody.


    What doesn't work? The kinds of things that everyone "thinks" are an
    image link? Of course it works.

    > Friend of mine only recently discovered that not every
    > visitor is waving their mouse over the page, thus
    > discovering the images are links.


    And not everyone has underlining turned on either. That's a moot point.
    Remember the Web is not 100%. Your page will never work exactly as you
    plan on every single visitor. You have to take that into consideration
    when developing.
    --
    Whitecrest Entertainment
    www.whitecrestent.com
    Whitecrest, Jun 7, 2004
    #13
  14. Gillian White

    Els Guest

    Whitecrest wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > says...
    >
    >>>>... and an image? When would one expect an image to have a link on it?
    >>>>Underlined? Bordered? HandCursor? "Click Here" alt text?
    >>>
    >>>Think about it. When do YOU think there is a link on an image?

    >>
    >>I'm afraid that doesn't work for everybody.

    >
    > What doesn't work? The kinds of things that everyone "thinks" are an
    > image link? Of course it works.


    I meant that "When do YOU think there is a link on an
    image?" isn't a good reference for _everybody_. _I_ might
    think there is a link on an image, where noone else in the
    whole wide world would expect one, so what _I_ think, might
    not be the solution at all.

    For some it is, of course, but for some it isn't.

    --
    Els
    http://locusmeus.com/
    Sonhos vem. Sonhos vão. O resto é imperfeito.
    - Renato Russo -
    Els, Jun 7, 2004
    #14
  15. Gillian White

    Karl Groves Guest

    "Els" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Karl Groves wrote:
    >
    > > "DU" <> wrote in message
    > > news:ca0kmd$gdn$...
    > >
    > >>I don't agree that underlining links is the most common way to recognize
    > >>a link as a link; at least, I don't believe it is the most important
    > >>visual feedback to identify them.

    > >
    > > I do.
    > > I've seen users in usability tests click on *anything* that was

    underlined.
    > > This includes black-on-white text where the actual links were blue/
    > > underlined and the underlined text was black. The underline, to them,
    > > represented a link.

    >
    > I agree that the underlining clearly represents a link, but
    > the other way round I think it is different.
    > If there are no underlined pieces of text on the page at
    > all, neither links nor other text, I think the difference in
    > colour gives away what is a link and what not.


    Yes, this is true. I think in such a case, it depends largely on the
    differences between the colors of the text and the colors of the links.
    Contrast is *very* important in such a case, and blue links with
    black-on-white text is still best. IMO, it warrants testing in any other
    situation.

    -Karl
    Karl Groves, Jun 7, 2004
    #15
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