Java cousins

Discussion in 'Java' started by bob smith, Jan 24, 2013.

  1. bob smith

    bob smith Guest

    I was just wondering what other technologies besides Java are affected by the Oracle/Sun issue. I think JavaScript is somewhat affected, but I don't fully understand that.
     
    bob smith, Jan 24, 2013
    #1
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  2. bob smith

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 1/24/2013 2:01 PM, bob smith wrote:
    > I was just wondering what other technologies besides Java are affected by the Oracle/Sun issue. I think JavaScript is somewhat affected, but I don't fully understand that.


    What issue?

    The security problem impacted Java 7 u 0-10. It is fixed in u 11. And it
    did not impact Java 6.

    I believe it was all platforms.

    It has absolutely nothing to do with JavaScript.

    Whether Java implementations from other vendors (OpenJDK, IBM, HP etc.)
    has the problem would need to be checked with them.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Jan 24, 2013
    #2
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  3. bob smith

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 1/24/2013 2:18 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > On 1/24/2013 2:01 PM, bob smith wrote:
    >> I was just wondering what other technologies besides Java are affected
    >> by the Oracle/Sun issue. I think JavaScript is somewhat affected, but
    >> I don't fully understand that.

    >
    > What issue?
    >
    > The security problem impacted Java 7 u 0-10. It is fixed in u 11. And it
    > did not impact Java 6.
    >
    > I believe it was all platforms.
    >
    > It has absolutely nothing to do with JavaScript.
    >
    > Whether Java implementations from other vendors (OpenJDK, IBM, HP etc.)
    > has the problem would need to be checked with them.


    And in some ways I think there has been an overreaction on that
    security issue.

    Security issues are bad. And they should not be there.

    But they are. I can practical guarantee that there
    will be found several more security issues for the rest
    of 2013.

    There has for all previous years.

    Java, Flash, Acrobat Reader, SilverLight, JavaScript etc.
    has all been hit at various times.

    But everybody switching to Lynx is not really a viable option.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Jan 24, 2013
    #3
  4. bob smith

    Joerg Meier Guest

    On Thu, 24 Jan 2013 11:01:25 -0800 (PST), bob smith wrote:

    > I was just wondering what other technologies besides Java are affected by the Oracle/Sun issue. I think JavaScript is somewhat affected, but I don't fully understand that.


    Java and JavaScript are really in no way related. The confusingly similar
    naming is the only thing they have in common, other than that, they are
    about as related as Java is to the similarly named coffee.

    Liebe Gruesse,
    Joerg

    --
    Ich lese meine Emails nicht, replies to Email bleiben also leider
    ungelesen.
     
    Joerg Meier, Jan 25, 2013
    #4
  5. bob smith

    BGB Guest

    On 1/25/2013 3:26 AM, Joerg Meier wrote:
    > On Thu, 24 Jan 2013 11:01:25 -0800 (PST), bob smith wrote:
    >
    >> I was just wondering what other technologies besides Java are affected by the Oracle/Sun issue. I think JavaScript is somewhat affected, but I don't fully understand that.

    >
    > Java and JavaScript are really in no way related. The confusingly similar
    > naming is the only thing they have in common, other than that, they are
    > about as related as Java is to the similarly named coffee.
    >


    naming is fun isn't it...


    but, oddly, no one seems to really be rapidly jumping over to the
    ECMAScript name...

    but, not many people are comfortable with the Java trademark either.

    so, we end up with a lot of <InsertNameHere>Script (or "WhateverScript")
    languages...
    admittedly, my language is included in this category as well.

    it sort of works partly as ECMAScript sort of has fuzzy borders, so more
    or less anything with a similar syntax and similar features will fit.

    can you type: "var obj={x: 3, y: 4};" and "function foo(x) { ... }" and
    similar? good enough...


    unlike many other languages, there is no limit on how many syntax
    features or keywords can be added, and a person can also usually get by
    leaving things out as well, so the borders between ECMAScript and
    WhateverScript are much less clearly defined than, say, between C and
    Java, ...

    (and, one can tempt the waters, by say, using less absurd semantics for
    '==', ...).


    but, ironically, JavaScript remains more distinctive at least as far as
    it is "the language that runs in web-browsers and is directly embedded
    into HTML documents", and generally bounded by "you can't vary things
    too much, or people wont use a browser where most websites don't work,
    or a site where most browsers don't work", which is a property generally
    absent from many other WhateverScript variants (since there may be
    little or no direct need to share code with other implementations).

    but, with the drawback that many people are so often prone to confuse
    JavaScript and Java.


    or such...
     
    BGB, Jan 25, 2013
    #5
  6. bob smith

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 12:22:25 -0600, BGB <> wrote,
    quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

    >
    >but, oddly, no one seems to really be rapidly jumping over to the
    >ECMAScript name...

    it sounds too much like enemascript.
    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products http://mindprod.com
    The first 90% of the code accounts for the first 90% of the development time.
    The remaining 10% of the code accounts for the other 90% of the development
    time.
    ~ Tom Cargill Ninety-ninety Law
     
    Roedy Green, Jan 26, 2013
    #6
  7. bob smith

    BGB Guest

    On 1/26/2013 4:49 AM, Roedy Green wrote:
    > On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 12:22:25 -0600, BGB <> wrote,
    > quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :
    >
    >>
    >> but, oddly, no one seems to really be rapidly jumping over to the
    >> ECMAScript name...

    > it sounds too much like enemascript.
    >


    some people compared it to EczemaScript, which generally isn't very good
    either.
     
    BGB, Jan 27, 2013
    #7
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