non-standard characters

Discussion in 'HTML' started by thedarkman, Mar 7, 2009.

  1. thedarkman

    thedarkman Guest

    Hi,

    does anyone know how to code a musical flat sign? I could use an
    italicised b but figured there must be one. Also, the stressed W as in
    Owain Glyndŵr. Finally, does anyone know what the extended F - ASC 159
    is called?

    Thanks
     
    thedarkman, Mar 7, 2009
    #1
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  2. On 07 Mar 2009, thedarkman <> wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > does anyone know how to code a musical flat sign? I could use an
    > italicised b but figured there must be one. Also, the stressed W as in
    > Owain Glyndŵr. Finally, does anyone know what the extended F - ASC 159
    > is called?
    >
    > Thanks


    http://www.lib.virginia.edu/artsandmedia/dmmc/Music/UnicodeMusic/


    --
    Awful Dog Autry
     
    Awful Dog Autry, Mar 7, 2009
    #2
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  3. thedarkman wrote:

    > does anyone know how to code a musical flat sign?


    Hint: Google for
    fileformat.info "flat sign"
    and you'll find U+266D, representable in HTML e.g. as ♭.

    Another useful approach is to start from
    http://www.alanwood.net/unicode/index.html#links

    Usual caveats apply; see especially
    http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/266d/fontsupport.htm

    In practice, though, if you use, say,
    <span class="special">Ċ</span>
    with the CSS rule
    ..special { font-family: Arial Unicode MS, Lucida Sans Unicode; }
    then most visitors will see the flat sign. Others will see some box or
    question mark.

    > I could use an italicised b


    The flat sign resembles the letter b (and is historically based on it), but
    there's nothing italics-like with it - it isn't even slanted.

    > Also, the stressed W as in
    > Owain Glyndŵr.


    Hint: As a letter, it's w with circumflex.

    > Finally, does anyone know what the extended F - ASC 159
    > is called?


    There is no such thing. The ASCII code range ends at 127 decimal. Always
    did, and always will.

    But presumably you mean the character that has code number 159 decimal in
    code page 850. In Unicode, it's called "Latin small letter f with hook",
    U+0192. It has a "mnemonic" name in HTML: &fnof; (but I'd rather write it as
    such, in suitable encoding, or as ƒ if I even found some need to use
    it).

    None of these characters is non-standard; they are all defined in the
    Unicode Standard and the ISO 10646 standard.

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Mar 7, 2009
    #3
  4. thedarkman

    thedarkman Guest

    Thanks but I'm none the wiser, now how do I write a flat sign in a web
    page, and a stressed W. If you actually know?

    On 7 Mar, 18:06, "Jukka K. Korpela" <> wrote:
    > thedarkman wrote:
    > > does anyone know how to code a musical flat sign?

    >
    > Hint: Google for
    > fileformat.info "flat sign"
    > and you'll find U+266D, representable in HTML e.g. as ♭.
    >
    > Another useful approach is to start fromhttp://www.alanwood.net/unicode/index.html#links
    >
    > Usual caveats apply; see especiallyhttp://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/266d/fontsupport.htm
    >
    > In practice, though, if you use, say,
    > <span class="special">Ċ</span>
    > with the CSS rule
    > .special { font-family: Arial Unicode MS, Lucida Sans Unicode; }
    > then most visitors will see the flat sign. Others will see some box or
    > question mark.
    >
    > > I could use an italicised b

    >
    > The flat sign resembles the letter b (and is historically based on it), but
    > there's nothing italics-like with it - it isn't even slanted.
    >
    > > Also, the stressed W as in
    > > Owain Glyndŵr.

    >
    > Hint: As a letter, it's w with circumflex.
    >
    > > Finally, does anyone know what the extended F - ASC 159
    > > is called?

    >
    > There is no such thing. The ASCII code range ends at 127 decimal. Always
    > did, and always will.
    >
    > But presumably you mean the character that has code number 159 decimal in
    > code page 850. In Unicode, it's called "Latin small letter f with hook",
    > U+0192. It has a "mnemonic" name in HTML: &fnof; (but I'd rather write it as
    > such, in suitable encoding, or as ƒ if I even found some need to use
    > it).
    >
    > None of these characters is non-standard; they are all defined in the
    > Unicode Standard and the ISO 10646 standard.
    >
    > --
    > Yucca,http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
     
    thedarkman, Mar 8, 2009
    #4
  5. thedarkman

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Ben C <> wrote:

    > On 2009-03-08, thedarkman <> wrote:
    > > Thanks but I'm none the wiser, now how do I write a flat sign in a web
    > > page

    >
    > Well he told you, although actually there does seem to be a small error.
    >
    > He suggested:
    >
    > >> In practice, though, if you use, say,
    > >> <span class="special">Ċ</span>
    > >> with the CSS rule
    > >> .special { font-family: Arial Unicode MS, Lucida Sans Unicode; }
    > >> then most visitors will see the flat sign. Others will see some box or
    > >> question mark.

    >
    > That should be ♭... You need the x because 266d is a
    > hexadecimal number.


    And a very nice shape too:

    <http://dorayme.netweaver.com.au/flatDisplay.html>

    (OP should use span in his context, unlike here)

    For those of you with MacIE 5 on Macs, some surprising behaviour as you
    change text size in browser. All this, by the way.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Mar 8, 2009
    #5
  6. thedarkman

    thedarkman Guest

    The first one makes a square, the second gives a W but with the wrong
    type of stress. Thanks anyway.

    On 8 Mar, 21:55, dorayme <> wrote:
    > In article <>,
    >  Ben C <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On 2009-03-08, thedarkman <> wrote:
    > > > Thanks but I'm none the wiser, now how do I write a flat sign in a web
    > > > page

    >
    > > Well he told you, although actually there does seem to be a small error..

    >
    > > He suggested:

    >
    > > >> In practice, though, if you use, say,
    > > >> <span class="special">Ċ</span>
    > > >> with the CSS rule
    > > >> .special { font-family: Arial Unicode MS, Lucida Sans Unicode; }
    > > >> then most visitors will see the flat sign. Others will see some box or
    > > >> question mark.

    >
    > > That should be ♭... You need the x because 266d is a
    > > hexadecimal number.

    >
    > And a very nice shape too:
    >
    > <http://dorayme.netweaver.com.au/flatDisplay.html>
    >
    > (OP should use span in his context, unlike here)
    >
    > For those of you with MacIE 5 on Macs, some surprising behaviour as you
    > change text size in browser. All this, by the way.
    >
    > --
    > dorayme- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -
     
    thedarkman, Mar 9, 2009
    #6
  7. thedarkman

    dorayme Guest

    In article
    <>,
    thedarkman <> wrote:

    > > <http://dorayme.netweaver.com.au/flatDisplay.html>


    >
    > The first one makes a square, the second gives a W but with the wrong
    > type of stress. Thanks anyway.


    And what does the only one thing in the URL give? Roger Rabbit?

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Mar 9, 2009
    #7
  8. thedarkman wrote:

    > The first one makes a square, the second gives a W but with the wrong
    > type of stress.


    I actually wrote about caveats, too. But you seem to keep missing points
    since you quote comprehensively instead of reading comprehensively.

    > Thanks anyway.


    You're welcome. To get real help, you need to read the responses you get -
    and to post a URL (and specify browser).

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Mar 9, 2009
    #8
  9. thedarkman

    thedarkman Guest

    I'm using Internet Explorer 6; I really thought this would be simple;
    if for example I want to key a stressed E in Word /I put on Numbers
    lock, hold down the alt key and key in 130; isn't there something as
    simple as that for a flat sign?

    Thanks



    On 9 Mar, 20:01, "Jukka K. Korpela" <> wrote:
    > thedarkman wrote:
    > > The first one makes a square, the second gives a W but with the wrong
    > > type of stress.

    >
    > I actually wrote about caveats, too. But you seem to keep missing points
    > since you quote comprehensively instead of reading comprehensively.
    >
    > > Thanks anyway.

    >
    > You're welcome. To get real help, you need to read the responses you get -
    > and to post a URL (and specify browser).
    >
    > --
    > Yucca,http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
     
    thedarkman, Mar 10, 2009
    #9
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