OT: Computer language names

Discussion in 'C++' started by Ebenezer, Mar 22, 2011.

  1. Ebenezer

    Ebenezer Guest

    I was thinking of how search engines don't like one or two
    letter words as input and how that would make it difficult
    to search for C libraries and so forth. C++ seems to be
    favored in this respect over even some more recent langauges --
    D is no better than C. Java is more search engine freindly than
    C or D, but the word has several alternative meanings. I conclude
    C++ is a pretty good name for a language -- it is unique and
    substantial enough for search engines to be able to work with.


    Brian Wood
    Ebenezer Enterprises
    http://webEbenezer.net
    Ebenezer, Mar 22, 2011
    #1
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  2. Ebenezer

    red floyd Guest

    On Mar 22, 8:14 am, Ebenezer <> wrote:
    > I was thinking of how search engines don't like one or two
    > letter words as input and how that would make it difficult
    > to search for C libraries and so forth.  


    So? Use quotes.

    "C library"
    red floyd, Mar 22, 2011
    #2
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  3. Ebenezer

    osmium Guest

    red floyd wrote:

    > On Mar 22, 8:14 am, Ebenezer <> wrote:
    >> I was thinking of how search engines don't like one or two
    >> letter words as input and how that would make it difficult
    >> to search for C libraries and so forth.

    >
    > So? Use quotes.
    >
    > "C library"


    I only get four hits for
    "c libraries and so forth"
    osmium, Mar 22, 2011
    #3
  4. Ebenezer

    James Guest

    > I conclude
    > C++ is a pretty good name for a language -- it is unique and
    > substantial enough for search engines to be able to work with.


    Reminds me of Donald Knuth's quote about language names...

    "The most important thing in the programming language is the name. A
    language will not succeed without a good name. I have recently
    invented a very good name and now I am looking for a suitable
    language."

    James
    James, Mar 23, 2011
    #4
  5. Ebenezer

    Jorgen Grahn Guest

    On Tue, 2011-03-22, Ebenezer wrote:
    >
    > I was thinking of how search engines don't like one or two
    > letter words as input and how that would make it difficult
    > to search for C libraries and so forth. C++ seems to be
    > favored in this respect over even some more recent langauges --
    > D is no better than C. Java is more search engine freindly than
    > C or D, but the word has several alternative meanings. I conclude
    > C++ is a pretty good name for a language -- it is unique and
    > substantial enough for search engines to be able to work with.


    The worst aspect of the name C++ is that it doesn't hyphenate correctly
    in various applications: you get to see things like C-
    ++.

    /Jorgen

    --
    // Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
    \X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
    Jorgen Grahn, Mar 23, 2011
    #5
  6. Ebenezer

    Rolf Magnus Guest

    Sherm Pendley wrote:

    > Ebenezer <> writes:
    >
    >> I was thinking of how search engines don't like one or two
    >> letter words as input and how that would make it difficult
    >> to search for C libraries and so forth.

    >
    > Only if your google-fu is weak. Searching for "C Libraries" (with the
    > quotes) solves that issue quite well.


    And it seems that google fixed something. It even works for C++. Some time
    ago, they were ignoring the ++.
    Rolf Magnus, Mar 24, 2011
    #6
  7. Ebenezer <> wrote:
    > I was thinking of how search engines don't like one or two
    > letter words as input and how that would make it difficult
    > to search for C libraries and so forth. C++ seems to be
    > favored in this respect over even some more recent langauges --
    > D is no better than C. Java is more search engine freindly than
    > C or D, but the word has several alternative meanings. I conclude
    > C++ is a pretty good name for a language -- it is unique and
    > substantial enough for search engines to be able to work with.


    Except that many search engines don't like non-alphanumeric characters
    such as '+' and will often either strip them or interpret them in some
    special way. (I assume engines like google have special exceptions for
    search terms such as "c++" so that it won't interpret the plus symbols
    in special ways or strip them.)
    Juha Nieminen, Mar 24, 2011
    #7
  8. Ebenezer

    James Kanze Guest

    On Mar 22, 3:14 pm, Ebenezer <> wrote:
    > I was thinking of how search engines don't like one or two
    > letter words as input and how that would make it difficult
    > to search for C libraries and so forth. C++ seems to be
    > favored in this respect over even some more recent langauges --
    > D is no better than C. Java is more search engine freindly than
    > C or D, but the word has several alternative meanings. I conclude
    > C++ is a pretty good name for a language -- it is unique and
    > substantial enough for search engines to be able to work with.


    The '+' character is a meta-character in a lot of contexts,
    which means you have to escape it. (IIRC, that posed some
    problems when we first set up comp.lang.c++.moderated. The
    original moderation email address also had c++ in it, and some
    mail forwarders bawked.)

    --
    James Kanze
    James Kanze, Mar 26, 2011
    #8
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