problem with filenames, Filenames and FILENAMES

Discussion in 'HTML' started by B.J., Apr 22, 2005.

  1. B.J.

    B.J. Guest

    hallo

    i have problem with my web site:

    morning i copied my files on to CD
    next j want to upload (from my job) my site but most from files have
    NAME.*** and url adreses is not correct and doesn't work any links ??

    why its like that ?? what i do wrong ?? how can j repeair that (i have not
    here original files - i have only bad copy)

    is posible that commander change the names to NAMES when i copy files ??

    please hel me
    Bolo
     
    B.J., Apr 22, 2005
    #1
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  2. B.J.

    Greg Schmidt Guest

    On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 10:52:35 +0200, B.J. wrote:

    > morning i copied my files on to CD
    > next j want to upload (from my job) my site but most from files have
    > NAME.*** and url adreses is not correct and doesn't work any links ??
    >
    > why its like that ?? what i do wrong ?? how can j repeair that (i have not
    > here original files - i have only bad copy)
    >
    > is posible that commander change the names to NAMES when i copy files ??


    Sounds like you didn't use the right mode when creating the CD. The
    original CD data format specified files in the 8.3 case-insensitive
    (i.e. write everything as upper case) format common to DOS at the time.
    Newer formats (can't remember the names) support longer filenames and
    retaining the case. That will help you next time, but not this time.

    Since the incorrect case is causing problems, I'm guessing that you're
    running a UNIX-based server, most likely Apache. If so, look into the
    mod_speling (sic) module, which can get your links working again
    quickly, and then you can rename files at your convenience.

    Also, standard UNIX tools (if you have shell access) will make it easy
    to convert all of your filenames from UPPER to lower case and convert
    extensions from .htm to .html. If you have used MixedCase, then you're
    probably stuck with manual renaming.

    --
    Greg Schmidt
    Trawna Publications http://www.trawna.com/
     
    Greg Schmidt, Apr 22, 2005
    #2
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  3. B.J.

    mbstevens Guest

    Greg Schmidt wrote:

    > Also, standard UNIX tools (if you have shell access)
    > will make it easy to convert all of your filenames from
    > UPPER to lower case and convert
    > extensions from .htm to .html. If you have used
    > MixedCase, then you're probably stuck with manual
    > renaming.
    >

    There is a Perl module made specifically for extracting
    links from pages called HTML::LinkExtor, and another
    module that iterates through file trees called
    File::Find. Those, combined with Perl's regular
    expressions, should do the trick with very little code.
    Perl runs on most operating systems. This is perhaps a
    chance for the op to get a little coding under the belt.
    --
    mbstevens http://www.mbstevens.com/
     
    mbstevens, Apr 22, 2005
    #3
  4. B.J.

    Greg Schmidt Guest

    On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 18:13:48 GMT, mbstevens wrote:

    > Greg Schmidt wrote:
    >
    >> Also, standard UNIX tools (if you have shell access)
    >> will make it easy to convert all of your filenames from
    >> UPPER to lower case and convert
    >> extensions from .htm to .html. If you have used
    >> MixedCase, then you're probably stuck with manual
    >> renaming.
    >>

    > There is a Perl module made specifically for extracting
    > links from pages called HTML::LinkExtor, and another
    > module that iterates through file trees called
    > File::Find. Those, combined with Perl's regular
    > expressions, should do the trick with very little code.
    > Perl runs on most operating systems. This is perhaps a
    > chance for the op to get a little coding under the belt.


    Depending on the size of the site, it may or may not be worth automating
    the process. If it's 20 files, I'd do it by hand. If it's 100 files,
    I'd partially automate it by stringing together some shell commands and
    fix any special cases by hand. If it's much more than that, then a full
    Perl solution extracting links and renaming files based on closest
    matches would be worth putting the time into.

    I'm going to guess (based on the fact that the OP didn't bother checking
    the CD backup before wiping the original site) that they are not real
    experienced in the field, and therefore it's likely to be a small site.
    Anyway, discussion of such solutions is getting to be outside the purvey
    of this group. To the OP: if you want to rename the files using Perl,
    look for help in comp.lang.perl.misc but be sure to read the FAQ there
    first.

    --
    Greg Schmidt
    Trawna Publications http://www.trawna.com/
     
    Greg Schmidt, Apr 22, 2005
    #4
  5. B.J.

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Greg Schmidt wrote:

    > Sounds like you didn't use the right mode when creating the CD. The
    > original CD data format specified files in the 8.3 case-insensitive
    > (i.e. write everything as upper case) format common to DOS at the time.
    > Newer formats (can't remember the names) support longer filenames and
    > retaining the case.


    The "original CD data format" is iso9660. There are three "levels" of
    iso9660 -- the most basic only allows 8.3 file names, but level 2 allows
    31 characters.

    Newer CDs are still iso9660-based, but in addition have some hidden blocks
    of data that include extra information, like long file names. The data is
    still kept in iso9660, but the operating system ignores the iso9660 names
    and uses the names found in the blocks of extra information.

    One such format is Joliet, which was invented by Microsoft, but has fairly
    wide support on other platforms. It allows longer file names, deeper
    nesting of directories, non-ascii characters in file names and so on.

    Another newer format is Rock Ridge, which not only allows long file names,
    and deep nesting but not non-ascii characters. Rock Ridge also allows you
    to set permissions and file ownership details and create symlinks. There
    are moves to make it an ISO standard.

    ISO9660 level 1 is almost universally supported. Level 2 is not supported
    by MS-DOS, but enjoys otherwise good support. ISO level 3 is not supported
    by MS-DOS or pre-OSX Macintosh, but is supported by Windows and by most
    UNIX(-like) OSes. Joliet is supported by Windows and UNIX(-like) OSes.
    Rock Ridge is only supported in recent UNIX(-like) OSes.

    Fortunately, a CD-ROM can be burned with both Joliet *and* Rock Ridge
    extensions, so each OS can use the bits it understands.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Apr 23, 2005
    #5
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