Run Gnu compiler under VMWare?

Discussion in 'C++' started by me@privacy.net, Mar 10, 2010.

  1. Guest

    I'm an engineering student and taking C++ classes

    At school, we use Linux OS and the Gnu compiler

    Could I install VM Ware on my Windows desktop at home
    and install/run Linux and Gnu compiler under a VM so
    would be able to compile at home easily?
    , Mar 10, 2010
    #1
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  2. DeMarcus Guest

    wrote:
    > I'm an engineering student and taking C++ classes
    >
    > At school, we use Linux OS and the Gnu compiler
    >
    > Could I install VM Ware on my Windows desktop at home
    > and install/run Linux and Gnu compiler under a VM so
    > would be able to compile at home easily?


    Just do it. I can recommend openSUSE.
    www.opensuse.org

    Make sure you install development tools during the installation of
    Linux, then you have gcc to play around with.

    /DeMarcus
    DeMarcus, Mar 10, 2010
    #2
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  3. John H. Guest

    wrote:
    > At school, we use Linux OS and the Gnu compiler
    > Could my Windows desktop be able to compile at home easily?


    You might look into the Cygwin project. It provides a Linux like
    environment on Windows, including g++ (versions 3 and 4):
    http://www.cygwin.com/

    There is also the MinGW project which gives you g++ on a Windows:
    http://www.mingw.org/
    John H., Mar 11, 2010
    #3
  4. Guest

    Stuart Golodetz <>
    wrote:

    >Yes



    Ok great guys!!

    Sounds like many options for what I want to do

    I would go totally Linux but DO have windows app's I
    must use for engineering school as well
    , Mar 11, 2010
    #4
  5. Guest

    Stuart Golodetz <>
    wrote:

    >P.S. If you're writing (reasonably sane) standard C++ (which you may or
    >may not be), you could also just use a Windows compiler to test your
    >code. Microsoft Visual C++ Express is free to download.


    Yeah I thought abt that..... hmm..... but I've no
    experience with that compiler at all

    Is it "safe"? The code I write (baby programs).....
    must be submitted via Linux OS and must compile and run
    under G++.

    Is there any chance writing and testing at home on the
    MS VC++ will "break" anything? again I have no
    experience with it
    , Mar 11, 2010
    #5
  6. wrote:

    > Stuart Golodetz <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Yes

    >
    >
    > Ok great guys!!
    >
    > Sounds like many options for what I want to do
    >
    > I would go totally Linux but DO have windows app's I
    > must use for engineering school as well


    Run these app in Wine on Linux
    Michael Tsang, Mar 12, 2010
    #6
  7. Jorgen Grahn Guest

    On Thu, 2010-03-11, Paavo Helde wrote:
    > wrote in news::
    >
    >> Stuart Golodetz <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>P.S. If you're writing (reasonably sane) standard C++ (which you may or
    >>>may not be), you could also just use a Windows compiler to test your
    >>>code. Microsoft Visual C++ Express is free to download.

    >>
    >> Yeah I thought abt that..... hmm..... but I've no
    >> experience with that compiler at all
    >>
    >> Is it "safe"? The code I write (baby programs).....
    >> must be submitted via Linux OS and must compile and run
    >> under G++.
    >>
    >> Is there any chance writing and testing at home on the
    >> MS VC++ will "break" anything? again I have no
    >> experience with it

    >
    > There is a good chance that the code which you write in MSVC++ will not
    > compile with gcc, or has slightly different behavior. Also, MS has
    > declared most of POSIX functions "deprecated", which is quite annoying.
    > Also, there are so many different features, libraries, layers and options
    > present with MSVC++ that if you don't know exactly what you are doing,
    > you may easily get lost. Also, Windows has no support of UTF-8 locales,
    > which are the default in Linux.
    >
    > On the other hand, MSVC++ has very nice debugger, which is extremely
    > helpful for finding out what some code is actually doing.


    On the third hand, Linux has valgrind. And does the free Microsoft
    compiler come with the debugger?

    > In short, if your goal is to produce Linux-only software, then using
    > MSVC++ for that will probably have an adverse effect.


    If he has the energy to set up both, I think that's a good thing.
    Experience with different compilers cannot be a bad thing (as long as
    they are good compilers).

    But the biggest problem is probably the exercises themselves. We
    don't know anything about them, but chances are they use Unix-specific
    libraries or functionality. A pure C++ program can't do GUIs, TCP/IP
    and stuff like that.

    /Jorgen

    --
    // Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
    \X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
    Jorgen Grahn, Mar 13, 2010
    #7
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