selecting a pallete of unique colors

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Rahul, Jul 22, 2010.

  1. Rahul

    Rahul Guest

    This is more of a design and perception question so not sure what's a good
    group to post it on. I'm trying to generate a automated php status page for
    user-jobs running on our server-farm. Like so:

    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/118481/web_colors.jpg

    Each server name (eu001-eu261) is associated with exactly one jobnumber.
    But some jobs can run across many servers. i.e. number of jobs < number of
    servers. Many jobs use multiple servers.

    I tried loading a sample of HEX color values but many send up being so
    close to each other that often it gives an effect where servers seem to
    have the same color when, in fact, they have a different job that just
    randomly got assigned a similar color.

    Is there a way to get a pallate of 50 or so fairly unique (to perception)
    colors?

    --
    Rahul
     
    Rahul, Jul 22, 2010
    #1
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  2. On 22/07/10 23:50, Rahul wrote:
    > This is more of a design and perception question so not sure what's a good
    > group to post it on. I'm trying to generate a automated php status page for
    > user-jobs running on our server-farm. Like so:
    >
    > http://dl.dropbox.com/u/118481/web_colors.jpg
    >
    > Each server name (eu001-eu261) is associated with exactly one jobnumber.
    > But some jobs can run across many servers. i.e. number of jobs < number of
    > servers. Many jobs use multiple servers.
    >
    > I tried loading a sample of HEX color values but many send up being so
    > close to each other that often it gives an effect where servers seem to
    > have the same color when, in fact, they have a different job that just
    > randomly got assigned a similar color.
    >
    > Is there a way to get a pallate of 50 or so fairly unique (to perception)
    > colors?


    Hmm

    You might be able to simplify the problem:

    1) Use a standard colour for any job that is only running on a single
    server. This means that several jobs may be able to share a colour.

    2) Use a standard colour for an unused server.

    However, it might be that the way you're choosing to present the data
    isn't the best way to do so.

    Could you group the servers by job, with the jobs ordered by number of
    servers?

    Or perhaps a pie chart?

    I think part of your problem is that you're trying to convey too much
    information in a single graphic.

    Rgds

    Denis McMahon
     
    Denis McMahon, Jul 23, 2010
    #2
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  3. Rahul wrote:
    > This is more of a design and perception question so not sure what's a good
    > group to post it on. I'm trying to generate a automated php status page for
    > user-jobs running on our server-farm. Like so:
    >
    > http://dl.dropbox.com/u/118481/web_colors.jpg
    >
    > Each server name (eu001-eu261) is associated with exactly one jobnumber.
    > But some jobs can run across many servers. i.e. number of jobs < number of
    > servers. Many jobs use multiple servers.
    >
    > I tried loading a sample of HEX color values but many send up being so
    > close to each other that often it gives an effect where servers seem to
    > have the same color when, in fact, they have a different job that just
    > randomly got assigned a similar color.
    >
    > Is there a way to get a pallate of 50 or so fairly unique (to perception)
    > colors?
    >


    PHP knows nothing about colors - that is strictly HTML.

    You can pick any colors you want. And how to do it is up to you.

    I guess I'm really wondering what your PHP question is.

    --
    ==================
    Remove the "x" from my email address
    Jerry Stuckle
    JDS Computer Training Corp.

    ==================
     
    Jerry Stuckle, Jul 23, 2010
    #3
  4. Jerry Stuckle wrote:

    > Rahul wrote:
    >> Newsgroups: alt.html,comp.lang.php

    >
    > PHP knows nothing about colors - that is strictly HTML.
    >
    > I guess I'm really wondering what your PHP question is.


    Note where Rahul posted his question.

    --
    -bts
    -Four wheels carry the body; two wheels move the soul
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Jul 23, 2010
    #4
  5. Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    > Jerry Stuckle wrote:
    >
    >> Rahul wrote:
    >>> Newsgroups: alt.html,comp.lang.php

    >> PHP knows nothing about colors - that is strictly HTML.
    >>
    >> I guess I'm really wondering what your PHP question is.

    >
    > Note where Rahul posted his question.
    >


    I did, Beauregard. Just pointing out that c.l.p is not a good place to
    ask such a question.

    --
    ==================
    Remove the "x" from my email address
    Jerry Stuckle
    JDS Computer Training Corp.

    ==================
     
    Jerry Stuckle, Jul 23, 2010
    #5
  6. Jerry Stuckle wrote:

    > Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    >> Jerry Stuckle wrote:
    >>> Rahul wrote:
    >>>> Newsgroups: alt.html,comp.lang.php
    >>> PHP knows nothing about colors - that is strictly HTML.
    >>>
    >>> I guess I'm really wondering what your PHP question is.

    >>
    >> Note where Rahul posted his question.

    >
    > I did, Beauregard. Just pointing out that c.l.p is not a good place
    > to ask such a question.


    Why not? The PHP is going to have to generate the HTML (probably from
    an array of color codes) ... seems logical to me. There's no way the
    post-PHP script (the HTML) is going to be able to know what colors to
    use for the points on the graph.

    --
    -bts
    -Four wheels carry the body; two wheels move the soul
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Jul 23, 2010
    #6
  7. Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    > Jerry Stuckle wrote:
    >
    >> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    >>> Jerry Stuckle wrote:
    >>>> Rahul wrote:
    >>>>> Newsgroups: alt.html,comp.lang.php
    >>>> PHP knows nothing about colors - that is strictly HTML.
    >>>>
    >>>> I guess I'm really wondering what your PHP question is.
    >>> Note where Rahul posted his question.

    >> I did, Beauregard. Just pointing out that c.l.p is not a good place
    >> to ask such a question.

    >
    > Why not? The PHP is going to have to generate the HTML (probably from
    > an array of color codes) ... seems logical to me. There's no way the
    > post-PHP script (the HTML) is going to be able to know what colors to
    > use for the points on the graph.
    >


    PHP knows nothing about color. It also knows nothing about HTML. That
    is just strings to PHP.

    Please show me where in the PHP manual it discusses text colors, for
    instance. The only place you'll find such is in the GD libraries.

    --
    ==================
    Remove the "x" from my email address
    Jerry Stuckle
    JDS Computer Training Corp.

    ==================
     
    Jerry Stuckle, Jul 23, 2010
    #7
  8. Jerry Stuckle wrote:

    > Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    >> Jerry Stuckle wrote:
    >>> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    >>>> Jerry Stuckle wrote:
    >>>>> Rahul wrote:
    >>>>>> Newsgroups: alt.html,comp.lang.php
    >>>>> PHP knows nothing about colors - that is strictly HTML.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I guess I'm really wondering what your PHP question is.
    >>>> Note where Rahul posted his question.
    >>>
    >>> I did, Beauregard. Just pointing out that c.l.p is not a good
    >>> place to ask such a question.

    >>
    >> Why not? The PHP is going to have to generate the HTML (probably
    >> from an array of color codes) ... seems logical to me. There's no
    >> way the post-PHP script (the HTML) is going to be able to know what
    >> colors to use for the points on the graph.

    >
    > PHP knows nothing about color. It also knows nothing about HTML.
    > That is just strings to PHP.
    >
    > Please show me where in the PHP manual it discusses text colors, for
    > instance. The only place you'll find such is in the GD libraries.


    PHP knows what you write in the script.

    You're getting off-track. Rahul wants to generate a chart. He will have
    to code the colors in the PHP script for the various parts of the chart,
    and generate the HTML to display to the browser. Simple enough to
    realize what's necessary.

    --
    -bts
    -Four wheels carry the body; two wheels move the soul
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Jul 23, 2010
    #8
  9. Rahul

    Geoff Berrow Guest

    On Thu, 22 Jul 2010 22:50:40 +0000 (UTC), Rahul
    <> wrote:

    >Is there a way to get a pallate of 50 or so fairly unique (to perception)
    >colors?


    I can't comment about perception (or the way different monitors
    display colours) other than to say avoid the blue end of the spectrum.

    But to get an even distribution of 64 colours is easy enough

    000000, 000033, 000077, 0000BB 0000FF,330000,330033, etc

    See http://www.4theweb.co.uk/test/colorpicker64.php

    Even so, there just isn't enough difference

    It's tough even with 27 colours
    http://www.4theweb.co.uk/test/colorpicker27.php

    You may have more luck changing the background colour as well

    --
    Geoff Berrow (Put thecat out to email)
    It's only Usenet, no one dies.
    My opinions, not the committee's, mine.
    Simple RFDs www.4theweb.co.uk/rfdmaker
     
    Geoff Berrow, Jul 23, 2010
    #9
  10. Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    > Jerry Stuckle wrote:
    >
    >> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    >>> Jerry Stuckle wrote:
    >>>> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    >>>>> Jerry Stuckle wrote:
    >>>>>> Rahul wrote:
    >>>>>>> Newsgroups: alt.html,comp.lang.php
    >>>>>> PHP knows nothing about colors - that is strictly HTML.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I guess I'm really wondering what your PHP question is.
    >>>>> Note where Rahul posted his question.
    >>>> I did, Beauregard. Just pointing out that c.l.p is not a good
    >>>> place to ask such a question.
    >>> Why not? The PHP is going to have to generate the HTML (probably
    >>> from an array of color codes) ... seems logical to me. There's no
    >>> way the post-PHP script (the HTML) is going to be able to know what
    >>> colors to use for the points on the graph.

    >> PHP knows nothing about color. It also knows nothing about HTML.
    >> That is just strings to PHP.
    >>
    >> Please show me where in the PHP manual it discusses text colors, for
    >> instance. The only place you'll find such is in the GD libraries.

    >
    > PHP knows what you write in the script.
    >
    > You're getting off-track. Rahul wants to generate a chart. He will have
    > to code the colors in the PHP script for the various parts of the chart,
    > and generate the HTML to display to the browser. Simple enough to
    > realize what's necessary.
    >


    You're getting off topic. Please see his original question (which you
    conveniently snipped):

    "Is there a way to get a pallate of 50 or so fairly unique (to
    perception) colors?"

    Please show me where in the PHP manual it discusses such.

    Also, I see nothing to indicate a chart. He could easily be talking
    about a table, for instance.

    --
    ==================
    Remove the "x" from my email address
    Jerry Stuckle
    JDS Computer Training Corp.

    ==================
     
    Jerry Stuckle, Jul 23, 2010
    #10
  11. Rahul

    matt Guest

    On Jul 22, 9:35 pm, Jerry Stuckle <> wrote:
    > Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    > > Jerry Stuckle wrote:

    >
    > >> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    > >>> Jerry Stuckle wrote:
    > >>>> Rahul wrote:
    > >>>>> Newsgroups: alt.html,comp.lang.php
    > >>>> PHP knows nothing about colors - that is strictly HTML.

    >
    > >>>> I guess I'm really wondering what your PHP question is.
    > >>> Note where Rahul posted his question.
    > >> I did, Beauregard.  Just pointing out that c.l.p is not a good place
    > >> to ask such a question.

    >
    > > Why not?  The PHP is going to have to generate the HTML (probably from
    > > an array of color codes) ... seems logical to me. There's no way the
    > > post-PHP script (the HTML) is going to be able to know what colors to
    > > use for the points on the graph.

    >
    > PHP knows nothing about color.  It also knows nothing about HTML.  That
    > is just strings to PHP.


    That's garbage. It's an interesting thought experiment to see how one
    could build an algorithm to generate a set of unique-looking colors.
    If you don't have any positive suggestions, you *could* actually opt
    to just leave the thread alone instead of declaring anything out of
    your area of experience/interest to be off topic.

    Getting back to the OP, I suppose the first step is to try and
    identify a relationship between the color codes and perceptual
    "distance" between colors. It wouldn't be particularly difficult to
    treat the color code as a number (or 3 numbers) and say "give me a
    color y that's 30% different than x." It's the perceptual part that
    makes this a very interesting scenario.
     
    matt, Jul 23, 2010
    #11
  12. Rahul

    123Jim Guest

    "Rahul" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9DBDB585A6D9E6650A1FC0D7811DDBC81@81.169.183.62...
    > This is more of a design and perception question so not sure what's a good
    > group to post it on. I'm trying to generate a automated php status page
    > for
    > user-jobs running on our server-farm. Like so:
    >
    > http://dl.dropbox.com/u/118481/web_colors.jpg
    >
    > Each server name (eu001-eu261) is associated with exactly one jobnumber.
    > But some jobs can run across many servers. i.e. number of jobs < number of
    > servers. Many jobs use multiple servers.
    >
    > I tried loading a sample of HEX color values but many send up being so
    > close to each other that often it gives an effect where servers seem to
    > have the same color when, in fact, they have a different job that just
    > randomly got assigned a similar color.
    >
    > Is there a way to get a pallate of 50 or so fairly unique (to perception)
    > colors?



    How about dividing the cells into two cells with no dividing border .. one
    has the colour for the server, one has the colour for the job .. so you can
    quickly see the jobs of a certain colour and which servers are assigned to
    which job.
    That creates the task of choosing uniquely perceived colours ..here's a big
    list:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_colors

    Choose colours carefully and they will be sufficiently different to each
    other .. don't leave it to random choice. make a big list of suitable
    colours and then use only those randomly or as part of a queue of colour.
     
    123Jim, Jul 23, 2010
    #12
  13. matt wrote:
    > On Jul 22, 9:35 pm, Jerry Stuckle <> wrote:
    >> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    >>> Jerry Stuckle wrote:
    >>>> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    >>>>> Jerry Stuckle wrote:
    >>>>>> Rahul wrote:
    >>>>>>> Newsgroups: alt.html,comp.lang.php
    >>>>>> PHP knows nothing about colors - that is strictly HTML.
    >>>>>> I guess I'm really wondering what your PHP question is.
    >>>>> Note where Rahul posted his question.
    >>>> I did, Beauregard. Just pointing out that c.l.p is not a good place
    >>>> to ask such a question.
    >>> Why not? The PHP is going to have to generate the HTML (probably from
    >>> an array of color codes) ... seems logical to me. There's no way the
    >>> post-PHP script (the HTML) is going to be able to know what colors to
    >>> use for the points on the graph.

    >> PHP knows nothing about color. It also knows nothing about HTML. That
    >> is just strings to PHP.

    >
    > That's garbage. It's an interesting thought experiment to see how one
    > could build an algorithm to generate a set of unique-looking colors.
    > If you don't have any positive suggestions, you *could* actually opt
    > to just leave the thread alone instead of declaring anything out of
    > your area of experience/interest to be off topic.
    >
    > Getting back to the OP, I suppose the first step is to try and
    > identify a relationship between the color codes and perceptual
    > "distance" between colors. It wouldn't be particularly difficult to
    > treat the color code as a number (or 3 numbers) and say "give me a
    > color y that's 30% different than x." It's the perceptual part that
    > makes this a very interesting scenario.


    Show me where in the PHP manual it speaks anything about text colors.
    It doesn't, because it's not a PHP issue. It's an HTML issue.

    Just like generating a SELECT box is not a PHP issue - it's html. Sure,
    you may use PHP to generate the HTML for the SELECT box, but that's just
    a string to PHP. As are text colors.



    --
    ==================
    Remove the "x" from my email address
    Jerry Stuckle
    JDS Computer Training Corp.

    ==================
     
    Jerry Stuckle, Jul 23, 2010
    #13
  14. Rahul

    Rahul Guest

    Denis McMahon <> wrote in news:4c48d731
    $0$13041$:

    > Hmm
    >
    > You might be able to simplify the problem:
    >
    > 1) Use a standard colour for any job that is only running on a single
    > server. This means that several jobs may be able to share a colour.


    That's a good idea. THanks!

    > 2) Use a standard colour for an unused server.


    Could do. On the other hand most of the time we are operating at around
    100% utilization. So not many unused servers.


    > However, it might be that the way you're choosing to present the data
    > isn't the best way to do so.


    Sure, I'm open to sugesstions.

    > Could you group the servers by job, with the jobs ordered by number of
    > servers?


    May not work. The idea is to convey "job fragmentation". i.e. if a 10
    server job uses 10 contiguous servers it is better than 10 dispersed
    ones. This matters due to the way the network is set up. Servers closer
    together can communicate with lower latency.


    > I think part of your problem is that you're trying to convey too much
    > information in a single graphic.


    That may be true. I am just trying to push my boundaries of Information
    Density.


    --
    Rahul
     
    Rahul, Jul 24, 2010
    #14
  15. Rahul

    Rahul Guest

    matt <> wrote in news:26c0aa1e-c789-4459-bc43-
    :

    >
    > Getting back to the OP, I suppose the first step is to try and
    > identify a relationship between the color codes and perceptual
    > "distance" between colors. It wouldn't be particularly difficult to
    > treat the color code as a number (or 3 numbers) and say "give me a
    > color y that's 30% different than x." It's the perceptual part that
    > makes this a very interesting scenario.


    Agreed! The way I took the colors I am currently using is of a pallete of
    X11 colors. Before that I was toying with random RGB values. But the issue
    always is perceptual mapping.

    Two tuples can be both 10% off in some RGB-diff metric but humans might
    regard one pair as "close" and the other as "different". That's the
    challenge I am thinking about.



    --
    Rahul
     
    Rahul, Jul 24, 2010
    #15
  16. Rahul

    Rahul Guest

    "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in
    news:i2aqgs$8fm$-september.org:

    > Why not? The PHP is going to have to generate the HTML (probably from
    > an array of color codes) ... seems logical to me. There's no way the
    > post-PHP script (the HTML) is going to be able to know what colors to
    > use for the points on the graph.


    Exactly that route. My php queries the job-server then for each unique job
    in a hash-table it assigns the next color from a list of colors. The
    question is : WHat's the best order and composition of this list.



    --
    Rahul
     
    Rahul, Jul 24, 2010
    #16
  17. Rahul

    Rahul Guest

    "123Jim" <> wrote in
    news:i2c64d$q3o$-september.org:

    > How about dividing the cells into two cells with no dividing border ..
    > one has the colour for the server, one has the colour for the job ..


    That's an interesting visualization option but it only makes the color-
    uniqueness problem worse. Now I end up having twice the number of colors,
    right?

    > That creates the task of choosing uniquely perceived colours ..here's
    > a big list:
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_colors


    Thanks! I was currentyly using this list:

    http://www.uize.com/examples/sortable-color-table.html

    > Choose colours carefully and they will be sufficiently different to
    > each other .. don't leave it to random choice. make a big list of
    > suitable colours and then use only those randomly or as part of a
    > queue of colour.


    True. It is the composition of such a list that is difficult.




    --
    Rahul
     
    Rahul, Jul 24, 2010
    #17
  18. Rahul

    Rahul Guest

    (www.1-script.com) wrote in
    news:9c2a5$4c49d161$cf3aab60$:

    > Coding that would not be a big deal - Google (or Bing) Web-Safe
    > Colors, fill an array with them and off you go - but 50 unique ones
    > would be tough to find, even among the web-safe ones. Many colors look
    > the same depending on the monitor contrast settings and if your users
    > will have to see it on an older LCD monitor, they are guaranteed to be
    > lost after the first 30. That's my guess. I do have both a good old
    > LCD and a bad old LCD monitors and the difference in color
    > reproduction is incredible. On the bad one you'd be hard pressed to
    > see the difference between magenta and violet colors (for example).


    I was using the original X11 list (pasted below) but it doesn't seem to
    be working out so well. A second point is that the composition of the
    list is not the only parameter. THe order matters as well.

    e.g. Let's say that at a particular instant in time only 3 jobs run on
    the servers. Then it makes sense to use, say, red, orange, and yellow.

    But as the number of jobs increases I'd slowly need to fallback to colors
    that might be closer to something already on the list and then repeat the
    process.

    Eventually we might have 2 or 3 close colors and the idea is to minimize
    such combinations.

    >
    > You'll most likely have to also use some sort of unique captions or
    > unique shape icons if you need to show this many variations. Colors
    > alone may not do it for you.


    Thanks! That's an option. Another idea I have is to exploit the cursor
    use. i.e. if when a person moved his cursor above a particular server in
    the image then if all other servers in the same job also got highlighted
    in some fashion it'd be useful to draw out the similarity.

    Not sure if there's a way in HTML to do this? Maybe via a color-inversion
    etc? Or do I have to shift to AJAX or something fancier? All I need is
    some form of a "onhover" event that can be linked to all similar cells.
    Any tips?



    #######Color list##########

    bc8f8f
    cd5c5c
    a52a2a
    b22222
    f08080
    800000
    8b0000
    ff0000
    fffafa
    fa8072
    e9967a
    a0522d
    d2691e
    8b4513
    f4a460
    cd853f
    faf0e6
    d2b48c
    deb887
    faebd7
    f5deb3
    fdf5e6
    daa520
    b8860b
    f0e68c
    eee8aa
    bdb76b
    f5f5dc
    fafad2
    ffe4e1
    6b8e23
    9acd32
    556b2f
    ff6347
    8fbc8f
    228b22
    32cd32
    90ee90
    98fb98
    2e8b57
    3cb371
    66cdaa
    ff4500
    ff7f50
    ffa07a
    40e0d0
    20b2aa
    48d1cc
    2f4f4f
    2f4f4f
    afeeee
    5f9ea0
    b0e0e6
    add8e6
    87ceeb
    87cefa
    4682b4
    708090
    708090
    778899
    778899
    b0c4de
    6495ed
    4169e1
    191970
    e6e6fa
    483d8b
    6a5acd
    7b68ee
    fff5ee
    9370db
    8a2be2
    9932cc
    ffdab9
    ba55d3
    d8bfd8
    dda0dd
    ee82ee
    da70d6
    c71585
    ff8c00
    ffe4c4
    db7093
    dc143c
    ffdead
    ffebcd
    ffefd5
    ffe4b5
    ffa500
    fffaf0
    fff8dc
    ffd700
    fffacd
    808000
    ffff00
    ffffe0
    fffff0
    adff2f
    7cfc00
    7fff00
    006400
    008000
    00ff00
    f0fff0
    00ff7f
    f5fffa
    00fa9a
    7fffd4
    008080
    008b8b
    00ffff
    00ffff
    e0ffff
    f0ffff
    00ced1
    00bfff
    f0f8ff
    1e90ff
    000080
    00008b
    0000cd
    0000ff
    f8f8ff
    4b0082
    9400d3
    800080
    8b008b
    ff00ff
    ff00ff
    ff1493
    ff69b4
    fff0f5
    ffc0cb
    ffb6c1


    --
    Rahul
     
    Rahul, Jul 24, 2010
    #18
  19. Rahul wrote:
    > "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in
    > news:i2aqgs$8fm$-september.org:
    >
    >> Why not? The PHP is going to have to generate the HTML (probably from
    >> an array of color codes) ... seems logical to me. There's no way the
    >> post-PHP script (the HTML) is going to be able to know what colors to
    >> use for the points on the graph.

    >
    > Exactly that route. My php queries the job-server then for each unique job
    > in a hash-table it assigns the next color from a list of colors. The
    > question is : WHat's the best order and composition of this list.
    >
    >
    >


    Please explain where you find anything related to text color in the PHP
    documentation.

    The answer is - you can't, because this is not a PHP problem.

    According to your logic, I should ask my Linux questions in a C language
    newsgroup, because Linux is written in C.

    But in this case, it's not a PHP question because it doesn't matter how
    you create your HTML. It could be PHP, Perl, VBScript or any of a
    couple of dozen languages. The result is the same. And the fact you
    included alt.html in your crosspost indicates even you don't think this
    is a PHP problem (hint; HTML is NOT PHP!).

    A couple of people who would like to see this newsgroup turned into an
    "anything goes" newsgroup have argued it is on topic. But they haven't
    been able to show where such topics are referenced anywhere in the PHP
    documentation.

    Now please take your non-PHP questions to a more appropriate newsgroup.

    --
    ==================
    Remove the "x" from my email address
    Jerry Stuckle
    JDS Computer Training Corp.

    ==================
     
    Jerry Stuckle, Jul 24, 2010
    #19
  20. On 24/07/10 01:05, Rahul wrote:
    > Denis McMahon <> wrote in news:4c48d731
    > $0$13041$:
    >
    >> Hmm
    >>
    >> You might be able to simplify the problem:
    >>
    >> 1) Use a standard colour for any job that is only running on a single
    >> server. This means that several jobs may be able to share a colour.

    >
    > That's a good idea. THanks!
    >
    >> 2) Use a standard colour for an unused server.

    >
    > Could do. On the other hand most of the time we are operating at around
    > 100% utilization. So not many unused servers.
    >
    >> However, it might be that the way you're choosing to present the data
    >> isn't the best way to do so.

    >
    > Sure, I'm open to sugesstions.
    >
    >> Could you group the servers by job, with the jobs ordered by number of
    >> servers?

    >
    > May not work. The idea is to convey "job fragmentation". i.e. if a 10
    > server job uses 10 contiguous servers it is better than 10 dispersed
    > ones. This matters due to the way the network is set up. Servers closer
    > together can communicate with lower latency.
    >
    >> I think part of your problem is that you're trying to convey too much
    >> information in a single graphic.

    >
    > That may be true. I am just trying to push my boundaries of Information
    > Density.


    Someone else suggested using shapes.

    Take some main colours (VGA safe pallet):

    Red - #FF0000
    Yellow - #FFFF00
    Lime - #00FF00
    Aqua - #00FFFF
    Blue - #0000FF
    Fuchsia - #FF00FF
    Gray - #808080
    Silver - #C0C0C0
    Maroon - #800000
    Olive - #808000
    Green - #008000
    Teal - #008080
    Navy - #000080
    Purple - #800080

    Add some shapes:

    Triangle
    Square / Rectangle
    Diamond
    Inverted Triangle
    Pentagon
    Hexagon
    Octagon
    Circle / Oval

    14 colours * 8 shapes = 112 combinations

    Is that likely to be enough? It might give better differentiation.

    Rgds

    Denis McMahon
     
    Denis McMahon, Jul 24, 2010
    #20
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