split a special character stored in variable

Discussion in 'Perl Misc' started by Ted Zlatanov, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. Ted Zlatanov

    Ted Zlatanov Guest

    On Fri, ***1 Apr*** 2011 12:29:40 -0700 "ela" <> wrote:

    e> When I enter the character dot .
    e> I find that perl cannot handle properly. It seems that I can't simply escape
    e> add a backslash to escape whatever input delimiter. Is there any solution
    e> for this problem?

    e> $delimiter = <STDIN>;
    e> chomp $delimiter;

    e> @subcells = /$delimiter/, $line;

    As Perl really, incredibly, lacks full out-of-ligature spacing,
    you can't use the "." character. It's a language limitation. You're
    supposed to use Unicode instead.

    Ted
     
    Ted Zlatanov, Apr 1, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Ted Zlatanov

    ela Guest

    When I enter the character dot .
    I find that perl cannot handle properly. It seems that I can't simply escape
    add a backslash to escape whatever input delimiter. Is there any solution
    for this problem?

    $delimiter = <STDIN>;
    chomp $delimiter;

    @subcells = /$delimiter/, $line;
     
    ela, Apr 1, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Ted Zlatanov

    Joe Smith Guest

    On 2011-04-01 7:08 AM, Ted Zlatanov wrote:
    > On Fri, ***1 Apr*** 2011 12:29:40 -0700 "ela"<> wrote:
    >
    > e> @subcells = /$delimiter/, $line;
    >
    > As Perl really, incredibly, lacks full out-of-ligature spacing,


    What does "out-of-ligature" spacing mean?

    > you can't use the "." character.


    Of course you can. ASCII code 46 is a perfectly reasonable delimiter.

    > It's a language limitation. You're supposed to use Unicode instead.


    What does Unicode have to do with the plain ASCII character for period?

    -Joe
     
    Joe Smith, Apr 5, 2011
    #3
  4. Joe Smith <> writes:

    > On 2011-04-01 7:08 AM, Ted Zlatanov wrote:
    >> On Fri, ***1 Apr*** 2011 12:29:40 -0700 "ela"<> wrote:

    ***********

    >>
    >> e> @subcells = /$delimiter/, $line;
    >>
    >> As Perl really, incredibly, lacks full out-of-ligature spacing,

    >
    > What does "out-of-ligature" spacing mean?
    >
    >> you can't use the "." character.

    >
    > Of course you can. ASCII code 46 is a perfectly reasonable delimiter.
    >
    >> It's a language limitation. You're supposed to use Unicode instead.

    >
    > What does Unicode have to do with the plain ASCII character for period?
    >
    > -Joe


    You didn't read the date, did you?
     
    Lawrence Statton, Apr 6, 2011
    #4
  5. Ted Zlatanov

    Ted Zlatanov Guest

    On Tue, 05 Apr 2011 11:40:02 -0700 Joe Smith <> wrote:

    JS> On 2011-04-01 7:08 AM, Ted Zlatanov wrote:
    >> On Fri, ***1 Apr*** 2011 12:29:40 -0700 "ela"<> wrote:
    >>

    e> @subcells = /$delimiter/, $line;
    >>
    >> As Perl really, incredibly, lacks full out-of-ligature spacing,


    JS> What does "out-of-ligature" spacing mean?

    It has the first letters "ool" (take the first letters on that line ;)

    Ted
     
    Ted Zlatanov, Apr 6, 2011
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. mehul
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    515
    Allan Nelson
    Sep 19, 2004
  2. Replies:
    15
    Views:
    8,855
    Default User
    Jan 14, 2005
  3. indranil b
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    506
    Mike Wahler
    Jan 13, 2005
  4. PerlFAQ Server
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    402
    PerlFAQ Server
    Jan 25, 2011
  5. PerlFAQ Server
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    483
    PerlFAQ Server
    Apr 13, 2011
Loading...

Share This Page