suspicious RAM problems - mvo

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Mark, Jul 30, 2003.

  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Hi group,

    My company is doubting my applications; there are happening strange things
    in the field. It's about terminal running a state-machine on an old H8/500
    processor. The problems seems to be weird and like this.

    When we write software in the terminal's flash it runs differently from
    terminals that have another software-version pre-loaded. In both situations
    the previous software has to be overloaded fully (well, thats what is
    desired). A lot of people are 'against' us saying the previous version
    affects the new version.

    A guy made a loading sequence with functions copied to (and running from)
    RAM (still don't get how you do that trick, with the source-code in front of
    me but whatever). But I want to clear the RAM chip (512K) totally, first.

    Any tips on how to check the size of the RAM-chip? (the tricky-part:) We use
    hardware with both 256K and 512K RAM.

    Some tips would be appreciated very much!

    Best regards,
    M/\RK

    --

    M/\RK
     
    Mark, Jul 30, 2003
    #1
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  2. "Mark" <> writes:
    [...]
    > Any tips on how to check the size of the RAM-chip? (the tricky-part:) We use
    > hardware with both 256K and 512K RAM.


    Nope. Your question has nothing to do with the C programming
    language. The language defines no features having to do with RAM
    chips. (It's possible that a solution might be coded in C, but that
    doesn't make it a C problem.)

    There are probably people who can help you with this, but they don't
    hang out here. You'll need to find a newsgroup or other source of
    information that deals with your particular hardware. I don't know
    enough to tell you where to look (but a Google search might turn
    something up).

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://www.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    Schroedinger does Shakespeare: "To be *and* not to be"
     
    Keith Thompson, Jul 30, 2003
    #2
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  3. Mark

    goose Guest

    "Mark" <> wrote in message news:<tjVVa.3047$>...
    > Hi group,
    >
    > My company is doubting my applications; there are happening strange things
    > in the field. It's about terminal running a state-machine on an old H8/500
    > processor. The problems seems to be weird and like this.
    >
    > When we write software in the terminal's flash it runs differently from
    > terminals that have another software-version pre-loaded. In both situations
    > the previous software has to be overloaded fully (well, thats what is
    > desired). A lot of people are 'against' us saying the previous version
    > affects the new version.
    >
    > A guy made a loading sequence with functions copied to (and running from)
    > RAM (still don't get how you do that trick, with the source-code in front of
    > me but whatever). But I want to clear the RAM chip (512K) totally, first.
    >
    > Any tips on how to check the size of the RAM-chip? (the tricky-part:) We use
    > hardware with both 256K and 512K RAM.
    >
    > Some tips would be appreciated very much!


    <tip>
    try comp.arch.embedded
    </tip>

    good luck
    goose,
     
    goose, Jul 31, 2003
    #3
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