Command Line Arguments

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Hi. I'm studying how to robustly use command line arguments and have found some good examples using getopt_long on the Web. I am looking at this example I found at:


Code:
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <getopt.h>

/* Flag set by ‘--verbose’. */
static int verbose_flag;

int
main (int argc, char **argv)
{
  int c;

  while (1)
    {
      static struct option long_options[] =
        {
          /* These options set a flag. */
          {"verbose", no_argument,       &verbose_flag, 1},
          {"brief",   no_argument,       &verbose_flag, 0},
          /* These options don’t set a flag.
             We distinguish them by their indices. */
          {"add",     no_argument,       0, 'a'},
          {"append",  no_argument,       0, 'b'},
          {"delete",  required_argument, 0, 'd'},
          {"create",  required_argument, 0, 'c'},
          {"file",    required_argument, 0, 'f'},
          {0, 0, 0, 0}
        };
      /* getopt_long stores the option index here. */
      int option_index = 0;

      c = getopt_long (argc, argv, "abc:d:f:",
                       long_options, &option_index);

      /* Detect the end of the options. */
      if (c == -1)
        break;

      switch (c)
        {
        case 0:
          /* If this option set a flag, do nothing else now. */
          if (long_options[option_index].flag != 0)
            break;
          printf ("option %s", long_options[option_index].name);
          if (optarg)
            printf (" with arg %s", optarg);
          printf ("\n");
          break;

        case 'a':
          puts ("option -a\n");
          break;

        case 'b':
          puts ("option -b\n");
          break;

        case 'c':
          printf ("option -c with value `%s'\n", optarg);
          break;

        case 'd':
          printf ("option -d with value `%s'\n", optarg);
          break;

        case 'f':
          printf ("option -f with value `%s'\n", optarg);
          break;

        case '?':
          /* getopt_long already printed an error message. */
          break;

        default:
          abort ();
        }
    }

  /* Instead of reporting ‘--verbose’
     and ‘--brief’ as they are encountered,
     we report the final status resulting from them. */
  if (verbose_flag)
    puts ("verbose flag is set");

  /* Print any remaining command line arguments (not options). */
  if (optind < argc)
    {
      printf ("non-option ARGV-elements: ");
      while (optind < argc)
        printf ("%s ", argv[optind++]);
      putchar ('\n');
    }



  exit (0);
}


Note:  
          {"add",     no_argument,       0, 'a'},
          {"append",  no_argument,       0, 'b'},
          {"delete",  required_argument, 0, 'd'},
          {"create",  required_argument, 0, 'c'},
          {"file",    required_argument, 0, 'f'},

It teaches me pretty much everything I need to know, but I noticed it doesn't handle one situation very well.

If I enter say:     ./a.out  -d  -a

it knows that -d requires an argument, but because that argument is missing, it takes the next option (-a) as the argument to -d (if that makes sense). 

It produces output:   option -d with value `-a'  

For:  ./a.out  -a  -d    it outputs:

option -a

./a.out: option requires an argument -- 'd'

Is there an easy way to check that the next thing read is not in fact the next option??  Check for '-'  as te first character perhaps??

Or is there a better example for parsing command line arguments that I should be studying?

Thanks.
   

It only reports the "option requires and argument" error message if it is the last option specified
 

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