Example of HTML5 to be viewed on 4 commom browsers


C

cwdjrxyz

It now appears possible to write many pages in html5 that appear
nearly the same on four of the most common recent browers - Firefox,
Opera, Safari, and IE8. The greatest problem is poor support by IE 8,
although IE 9 is supposed to have considerably more html5 support. A
page that looks good on the 3 other browsers mentioned often looks
rather anemic on IE 8, although it often is at least readable. There
have been a few scripts that will force IE to support much of html5
that it does not now support. Using one of these scripts, IE8 often
displays well unless of course script is turned off. However script is
used so often on other html5 capable browsers, that you will have to
turn script on and off for all browsers to check if response to script
being off is important to you.

I have a page at http://www.cwdjr.net/html5/layoutDemoWithIEfix.html .
This page starts off with an example of several kinds of code unique
to html5. This comes from an example from a new book with a chapter
on html5 to illustrate some of the code. However the script for IE I
use is a newer one from Google that will do more. See the source code
for comments. I have added some video using the new <video> tag when
possible. First, I recently posted an example of valid video code in
html5 that is in fact exactly the code that works on xhtml. Thus you
can still use previous video code and not have to worry about the new
<video> tag. The various browsers have the option in html5 of having a
"house" video type support that does not depend on a commercial player
such as WMP, flv/swf, Real, or QT being installed on the computer. To
get around using commercial players the "house" player most commonly
being used is ogg based with both Firefox and Opera now using an ogg
base in connection with use of <video>. In the case of Safari, ogg
does not seem to be a "house" format, at least yet. However Safari
will accept mp4, as will some other browsers, but it does not stream
and download time can be excessive for long videos. However one can
use .mov format that has been prompted to stream. One can feed a mp4
file into the pay Pro QT player and then output it as a prompted .mov
file so that it will stream. I could not get the <video> tag to work
properly in the script-patched IE8, and it seems to have no "house"
format in the context of html5. However for it I can use conventional
ActiveX Microsoft video code inside a Microsoft conditional comment
path to stream flv/swf. For myself, I now see no advantage in using
the <video> tag of html5. However if one works for a profit-making
large corporation, there may be other considerations. If you use the
video player from another company and even use mp4 or mp3, you may
have to pay rights owners or get sued. This would be especially true
for a company that uses a commercial player format from another
company as the built in "house" player. If html5 becomes popular over
the next many years, there likely will be a "house" video format war
that is much greater than the browser war of many years ago.
 
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C

cwdjrxyz

It now appears possible to write many pages in html5  that appear
nearly the same on four of the most common recent browers - Firefox,
Opera, Safari, and IE8. The greatest problem is poor support by IE 8,
although IE 9 is supposed to have considerably more html5 support. A
page that looks good on the 3 other browsers mentioned often looks
rather anemic on IE 8, although it often is at least readable. There
have been a few scripts that will force IE to support much of html5
that it does not now support. Using one of these scripts, IE8 often
displays well unless of course script is turned off. However script is
used so often on other html5 capable browsers, that you will have to
turn script on and off for all browsers to check if response to script
being off is important to you.

I have a page athttp://www.cwdjr.net/html5/layoutDemoWithIEfix.html.
This page starts off with an example of several kinds of code unique
to html5. This comes from an example from a new  book with a chapter
on html5 to illustrate some of the code. However the script for IE I
use is a newer one from Google that will do more. See the source code
for comments. I have added some video using the new <video> tag when
possible. First, I recently posted an example of valid video code in
html5 that is in fact exactly the code that works on xhtml. Thus you
can still use previous video code and not have to worry about the new
<video> tag. The various browsers have the option in html5 of having a
"house" video type support that does not depend on a commercial player
such as WMP, flv/swf, Real, or QT being installed on the computer. To
get around using commercial players the "house" player most commonly
being used is ogg based with both Firefox and Opera now using an ogg
base in connection with use of <video>. In the case of Safari, ogg
does not seem to be a "house" format, at least yet. However Safari
will accept mp4, as will some other browsers, but it does not stream
and download time can be excessive for long videos. However one can
use .mov format that has been prompted to stream. One can feed a mp4
file into the pay Pro QT player and then output it as a prompted .mov
file so that it will stream. I could not get the <video> tag to work
properly in the script-patched IE8, and it seems to have no "house"
format in the context of html5. However for it I can use conventional
ActiveX Microsoft video code inside a Microsoft conditional comment
path to stream flv/swf. For myself, I now see no advantage in using
the <video> tag of html5. However if one works for a profit-making
large corporation, there may be other considerations. If you use the
video player from another company and even use mp4 or mp3, you may
have to pay rights owners or get sued. This would be especially true
for a company that uses a commercial player format from another
company as the built in "house" player. If html5 becomes popular over
the next many years, there likely will be a "house" video format war
that is much greater than the browser war of many years ago.

I now have added an example of the html5 <audio> tag support. It works
much as does the <video>. Both Firefox and Opera will accept an audio
ogg file as "house" supported input. Safari will not accept ogg, but
will accept an aiff file, and it will stream without running through a
QT Pro player to hint. Much as for video, I used a Microsoft ActiveX
object for Flash audio, since IE9 apparently does not support a
"house" audio for html5.
 
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C

cwdjrxyz

I now have added an example of the html5 <audio> tag support. It works
much as does the <video>. Both Firefox and Opera will accept an audio
ogg file as "house" supported input. Safari will not accept ogg, but
will accept an aiff file, and it will stream without running through a
QT Pro player to hint. Much as for video, I used a Microsoft ActiveX
object for Flash audio, since IE9 apparently does not support a
"house" audio for html5.

I just downloaded IE 9 beta, and it does support more of html5.

I have now found out that at least IE7, IE8, and IE9 beta will support
html5 code on the demo page. IE7 and IE8 require the script I used at
the top of the page, but IE 9 beta does not. Thus I have changed the
code with a different Microsoft comment around the script that only
introduces the script for IE versions less than 9. If you attempt to
use the <video> of html5 on IE9 beta only, it does make an attempt to
work. It reserves a space for the video and will show a "poster" in
that video space such as a jpg. However it will not show "controls"
and it will not respond to any video file type, such as .wmv, that I
have tried. Of course with IE9 now being in beta, it could change a
bit before the official release. The updated page is at:
http://www.cwdjr.net/html5/layoutDemoWithIEfix2.html . I am still
using Microsoft objects to display the video and audio for now for IE
browsers. Although I am using flv/swf, you should be aware that there
also are ActiveX objects to support many other formats including wmv,
wma, Real formats, and QT formats.
 

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