how can I obtain parentheses in an ordered list?


T

Toby A Inkster

Jonathan said:
Always been a mystery of the Supermarket!

None of the supermarkets I go to have the eggs even remotely near the
dairy produce. I suppose this is because the dairy produce needs to be
refrigerated, whereas eggs don't.

--
Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
Geek of ~ HTML/CSS/Javascript/SQL/Perl/PHP/Python*/Apache/Linux

* = I'm getting there!
 
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J

Jonathan N. Little

Toby said:
None of the supermarkets I go to have the eggs even remotely near the
dairy produce. I suppose this is because the dairy produce needs to be
refrigerated, whereas eggs don't.
I guess the eggs are older in the US, they refrigerate them.

Actually, raised chickens and eggs and you collect them daily and
refrigerate, if not and left out on under the hen they won't be fry-able
because that will be runny and not hold together in the pan.
 
B

Ben C

I guess the eggs are older in the US, they refrigerate them.

Actually, raised chickens and eggs and you collect them daily and
refrigerate, if not and left out on under the hen they won't be fry-able
because that will be runny and not hold together in the pan.

If you leave them under the hen for too long don't you end up with
chicken?
 
J

Jonathan N. Little

Ben said:
If you leave them under the hen for too long don't you end up with
chicken?

Only if you have a rooster, else otherwise you get another surprise! Not
at all pleasant!
 
B

Ben C

Only if you have a rooster, else otherwise you get another surprise! Not
at all pleasant!

So what happens, parthenogesis if you're very lucky, otherwise a rotten
egg?
 
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T

Toby A Inkster

Jonathan said:
Actually, raised chickens and eggs and you collect them daily and
refrigerate, if not and left out on under the hen they won't be fry-able
because that will be runny and not hold together in the pan.

None of the supermarkets I go to keep their eggs under hens either.

--
Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
Geek of ~ HTML/CSS/Javascript/SQL/Perl/PHP/Python*/Apache/Linux

* = I'm getting there!
 
T

Toby A Inkster

Jonathan said:
I guess the eggs are older in the US, they refrigerate them.

I tend to refrigerate them when I get home, but that's mostly because if I
put them in the cupboard something heavy could easily fall onto them. In
the fridge door, I don't have to worry about that.

--
Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
Geek of ~ HTML/CSS/Javascript/SQL/Perl/PHP/Python*/Apache/Linux

* = I'm getting there!
 
D

dorayme

Toby A Inkster said:
None of the supermarkets I go to have the eggs even remotely near the
dairy produce. I suppose this is because the dairy produce needs to be
refrigerated, whereas eggs don't.

It helps a lot if eggs are refrigerated over here. I have had so
many not altogether fresh ones from supermarkets for this very
reason. I twigged when I started buying eggs from the butchers!
(For you left wing, lettuce munchers, a butcher shop is always
cold)
 
D

dorayme

"Jonathan N. Little said:
Actually, raised chickens and eggs and you collect them daily and
refrigerate, if not and left out on under the hen they won't be fry-able
because that will be runny and not hold together in the pan.

If you get a fine injection and squeeze a little gelatin into the
central part a day before frying, this helps to hold it together.
 
D

dorayme

Toby A Inkster said:
I tend to refrigerate them when I get home, but that's mostly because if I
put them in the cupboard something heavy could easily fall onto them. In
the fridge door, I don't have to worry about that.

Eggs are more vulnerable to breakage in fridges because they get
all crowded, it is hard to see stuff without risk to the spine
when hauling things out. If the carton, or worse, the eggs
themselves fall and crack on the floor, all is not necessarily
lost: forget about any gooey stuff on floor itself. Carefully
close any badly gaping egg shells and/or wrap each cracked egg in
plastic wrap.
 
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B

Blinky the Shark

Toby said:
None of the supermarkets I go to have the eggs even remotely near the
dairy produce. I suppose this is because the dairy produce needs to be
refrigerated, whereas eggs don't.

They're usually nearby, here in Leftpondia.
 
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E

Ed Mullen

dorayme said:
Eggs are more vulnerable to breakage in fridges because they get
all crowded, it is hard to see stuff without risk to the spine
when hauling things out. If the carton, or worse, the eggs
themselves fall and crack on the floor, all is not necessarily
lost: forget about any gooey stuff on floor itself. Carefully
close any badly gaping egg shells and/or wrap each cracked egg in
plastic wrap.

You guys just need to get the larger fridges that are standard here. I
mean, geez, even with left-overs I haven't crushed an egg or any other
fragile thing in a fridge for 40 years or more ... oh, ok, really ...
EVER. No, wait, there was that one time when I put the salsa on top of
the guacamole and ... ewww! But, hey, I learned and now I use
industrial-strength plastic wrap and NOTHING cannot be stacked. ;-)

--
Ed Mullen
http://edmullen.net
http://mozilla.edmullen.net
http://abington.edmullen.net
A fool-proof method for sculpting an elephant: First, get a huge block
of marble; then chip away everything that doesn't look like an elephant.
 
B

Blinky the Shark

Ed said:
You guys just need to get the larger fridges that are standard here. I
mean, geez, even with left-overs I haven't crushed an egg or any other
fragile thing in a fridge for 40 years or more ... oh, ok, really ...
EVER. No, wait, there was that one time when I put the salsa on top of
the guacamole and ... ewww! But, hey, I learned and now I use
industrial-strength plastic wrap and NOTHING cannot be stacked. ;-)

Hey, I made guacamole today and it's in the fridge in a
plastic-wrap-covered bowl. So I should go stack something on it? I
have salsa... :)
 
A

Adrienne Boswell

Gazing into my crystal ball I observed Toby A Inkster
I tend to refrigerate them when I get home, but that's mostly because
if I put them in the cupboard something heavy could easily fall onto
them. In the fridge door, I don't have to worry about that.

According to Hormel <http://tinyurl.com/ayacz>:
"Eggs should be stored in the refrigerator in the carton they were
packed in. Many refrigerators provide storage for eggs in special units
in the door, but this is not the ideal place for storing eggs because
the temperature fluctuates so much in the door when it is opened and
closed. Eggs should be stored in the coldest part of the refrigerator
where the temperature remains constant. Eggs keep best when they are
stored at temperatures of no higher than 40°F. The ideal temperature
range is 33°F to 38°F. When the temperature is above 40°F, harmful
bacteria may grow rapidly. Although salmonella are not destroyed in
temperatures below 40°F, any of the bacteria that may be present will
not multiply when the temperature is below 40°F.

Eggs should be stored with the rounded end pointed up in order to keep
the air cell on top and to help keep the yolk centered in the egg. Never
store eggs next to strong smelling foods because eggshells are porous
and will allow strong odors to be absorbed into the egg over time. This
is another reason why it is a good idea to store eggs in the original
protective carton."
 
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B

Ben C

On 2007-02-04 said:
Eggs should be stored with the rounded end pointed up in order to keep
the air cell on top and to help keep the yolk centered in the egg.

I've heard of the little end and the big end, but which is the rounded
end?
 

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