Python testing tools

C

cutems93

I am currently doing some research on testing software for Python. I found that there are many different types of testing tools. These are what I've found.

1.Unit test
2.Mock test
3.Fuzz test
4.Web test
5.Acceptance/business logic test
6.GUI test
7.Source code checking
8.Code coverage
9.Continuous integration
10.Automatic test runners
11.Test fixtures

I know web and GUI testing tools are for specific uses. For instance, if you are not working with GUI or web pages, you don't need those testing tools.. Other than these two, do you use all of the other nine testing tools? I think many of you are using unit testing tools, such as unittest and doctest, and source code checking tools, like pylint or pychecker. Do you guys use#2,3,5,8,9,10 and 11 often?

Thanks!

-Min S.
 
S

Skip Montanaro

Thank you, but I already read this page before I posted this question. What I want to
know is whether you personally use these tools other than unit testing tools.

I tried using one of the mock tools a few years ago. I found it
didn't fit my brain very well. (Maybe it was just me.)

I use pylint all the time, and coverage from time-to-time, have used
nose in the past, but not for my current stuff. All are worth your
time.

Skip
 
C

cutems93

I tried using one of the mock tools a few years ago. I found it

didn't fit my brain very well. (Maybe it was just me.)



I use pylint all the time, and coverage from time-to-time, have used

nose in the past, but not for my current stuff. All are worth your

time.



Skip

Thank you! What tool do you use for coverage? And have you used pychecker? I heard it is as good as pylint. What do you think?

-Min S.
 
S

Skip Montanaro

Thank you! What tool do you use for coverage?

coverage. :)
And have you used pychecker?

Yes, in fact, I used to use a wrapper script I wrote that ran both
pylint and pychecker, then massaged the output into
suitable-for-emacs-next-error-command
I heard it is as good as pylint. What do you think?

They overlap a fair bit, but do somewhat different things.

S
 
C

cutems93

coverage. :)






Yes, in fact, I used to use a wrapper script I wrote that ran both

pylint and pychecker, then massaged the output into

suitable-for-emacs-next-error-command






They overlap a fair bit, but do somewhat different things.



S

Could you please elaborate on the difference of the two? I heard pylint does not import your source code when it is analyzing, while pychecker does. Does that make some difference? Moreover, do you personally like pylint or pycheker and why?

Thank you!!

-Min S.
 
S

Skip Montanaro

Could you please elaborate on the difference of the two? I heard pylint
does not import your source code when it is analyzing, while pychecker does.
Does that make some difference? Moreover, do you personally like pylint or
pycheker and why?

I haven't followed pychecker development for awhile. Pylint seems
more actively maintained, though I could be wrong. The import issue
is one significant difference, important if you are trying to check
scripts which have side effects when imported.

It's not a matter of like or not. I use what works and can easily be
fit into the way I work. Both pylint and pychecker satisfy that
constraint.

S
 
Y

Y Yen

I am currently doing some research on testing software for Python. I found that there are many different types of testing tools. These are what I'vefound.



1.Unit test

2.Mock test

3.Fuzz test

4.Web test

5.Acceptance/business logic test

6.GUI test

7.Source code checking

8.Code coverage

9.Continuous integration

10.Automatic test runners

11.Test fixtures



I know web and GUI testing tools are for specific uses. For instance, if you are not working with GUI or web pages, you don't need those testing tools. Other than these two, do you use all of the other nine testing tools? Ithink many of you are using unit testing tools, such as unittest and doctest, and source code checking tools, like pylint or pychecker. Do you guys use #2,3,5,8,9,10 and 11 often?



Thanks!



-Min S.

I found the python's unittest framework lack good reporting tools.

For my project (www.srcmap.com), I want something that does high level features integration tests, scriptable, generate report in HTML table format that label pass ->Green, fail -> Red. Separate by scripts, commands runs, etc.

In python, it is so trivial to write you own. It parse the json test scripts and execute the commands inside one at a time. It works very well.
 
C

cutems93

(You will benefit from also reading and applying

<URL:http://wiki.python.org/moin/GoogleGroupsPython> before using Google

Groups. My advice: choose a different interface to this forum, Google

Groups is terrible.)







Yes, I do :)



What are you actually wanting to learn, beyond a collection of “this is

what I use” stories?



--

\ “The way to build large Python applications is to componentize |

`\ and loosely-couple the hell out of everything.” —Aahz |

_o__) |

Ben Finney

Sorry, I didn't notice that there are new replies. I want to know why you are using other software than unittest. Are those software more like "options" or "necessities" for you?

Thank you!
Min S.
 

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