SQL DBA

M

mathew

In today’s IT – services marketplace, IT departments face a daunting
challenge: they must somehow deliver the highest quality at the lowest
cost, while navigating in a highly inefficient marketplace. Net Matrix
Solutions, Inc is the leading IT professional services provider
helping clients achieve their IT services goals with the quality they
deserve. We have delivered over 1000 project resources to various
clients across American continent. Our clients are typically Fortune 1
to Fortune 3000 companies.

We are looking "SQL DBA" for fulltime with our client in Houston,
TX.

Job Summary
Responsible for the overall design, maintenance, troubleshooting and
management of the enterprise databases and database environments.
Client support, business operations, software development, and new
product development
Provide database architecture and design support
tuning and performance, Database Security
Provide database development and support to all areas of the business
Product Development, Software Development, Database technology
consultation
Includes both internal and client facing deployments.

Required Experience:
• Minimum 5 years of hands on experience implementing and maintaining
relational database systems
• Minimum 2-3 years of taking lead responsibility in IT system
administration/relational database administration arena
• Possess good project management skills with attention to
prioritization, a high degree of accuracy, and attention to detail
• Must possess excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Requires demonstrated experience in one or more of the following area;
ability to define requirements, develop proposals, assess business
value, and interface effectively with potential clients and customers
• Must be a team player willing to contribute in a fast paced
environment
• Ability to independently research database problems by utilizing
good problem isolation techniques, interfacing with vendor support
organizations, testing proposed solutions, verifying successful
results, documenting solutions and disseminating information to
affected personnel.
• Possesses strong analytical abilities, proven technical skills,
project leadership and the ability to resolve problems in a timely
manner
• Exposure to any decision support tools, data marts and the latest
data warehouse features with Microsoft

This is a Fulltime in Houston, TX.

You can reach me at (e-mail address removed)/
713-401-9568
Mathew
Net Matrix Solutions, Inc
Web: www.netmatrixsolutions.com
Inc. 500/5000 Company - twice in a row | FastTech 50 award winner
three times in last four years
 
L

Lew

Leif said:
I like how they specified that it has to be an _SQL_ DBA, and not some
other kind of DBA (or rather, "DBA".)

Most often I find that by "SQL", recruiters mean "Microsoft SQL Server", an
interesting and perhaps offensive error.

I note that you pronounce "SQL" "ess queue ell". I usually pronounce it "sequel".

I also place opening braces differently depending on who's receiving my source.
 
M

Martin Gregorie

I note that you pronounce "SQL" "ess queue ell". I usually pronounce it
"sequel".
Pronouncing it as 'sequel' is, IME, largely an Americanism. I almost
never hear it used on this side of the pond.
 
M

markspace

Pronouncing it as 'sequel' is, IME, largely an Americanism. I almost
never hear it used on this side of the pond.


My understanding is that "Sequel" is actually its proper name and
calling it ess-queue-ell is a bit of a rubism. Since it was developed
on this side of the pond, we ought to know.

"SQL was initially developed at IBM by Donald D. Chamberlin and Raymond
F. Boyce in the early 1970s. This version, initially called SEQUEL
(Structured English Query Language)..."

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SQL>
 
A

Arne Vajhøj

My understanding is that "Sequel" is actually its proper name and
calling it ess-queue-ell is a bit of a rubism. Since it was developed on
this side of the pond, we ought to know.

"SQL was initially developed at IBM by Donald D. Chamberlin and Raymond
F. Boyce in the early 1970s. This version, initially called SEQUEL
(Structured English Query Language)..."

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SQL>

Did you read the pronunciation section of that link?

:)

Arne
 
M

markspace

Did you read the pronunciation section of that link?


All the business meetings and vendor presentations I've been too all
said "Sequel." Admittedly this was a few years (decades?) ago.
 
M

markspace

Yes, but you lot also say "elumenem" when you mean aluminium, so
clearly we can not trust Westpondians when it comes to pronounciation.


I'm pretty sure I pronounce it "aluminum," like a normal person. ;-)
 
M

Martin Gregorie

I believe both pronunciations are quite common, at least wherever I've
worked.

I switch between'em myself. Ayep.

Its the characteristic Westpondian habit of swallowing the
'i' in the final -ium syllable in Aluminium that I always notice,
particularly as its such an obvious anomaly: it is the only name of an
element to be pronounced that way. I've never heard anybody say Uranum,
Germanum, Plutonum or Helum.
 
L

Lew

Martin said:
Its the characteristic Westpondian habit of swallowing the
'i' in the final -ium syllable in Aluminium that I always notice,
particularly as its such an obvious anomaly: it is the only name of an
element to be pronounced that way. I've never heard anybody say Uranum,
Germanum, Plutonum or Helum.

I'm talking about "sequel" vs. "ess queue ell". Being American, I do not say
"aluminium", but that has no bearing on Java programming. SQL does.

That's the one I pronounce both ways. Who cares about non-Java-related words?
 
G

Gene Wirchenko

Its the characteristic Westpondian habit of swallowing the
'i' in the final -ium syllable in Aluminium that I always notice,

The I does not exist in our spelling of it. We do not swallow
it; we do not say it at all.
particularly as its such an obvious anomaly: it is the only name of an
element to be pronounced that way. I've never heard anybody say Uranum,
OH?

Germanum, Plutonum or Helum.

I have never heard anybody say "Molybdenium", "Platinium", or
"Lanthanium".

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
 
G

Gene Wirchenko

Fair cop.

Mind you, those are the only three (other than Al on the fence).
I did go through a Periodic Table to check, and I was expecting more.

Shall we go after all of metals not named per the "-um" or "-ium"
endings convention? There are some where such a name would fit the
abbreviation: Stibium for Antimony (Sb) and Stannum for Tin (Sn) for
two. Wolfram for Tungsten (W) is such a spoilsport though, and Helium
should be Helion.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
 

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