Advacnced C

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by janus, Dec 2, 2009.

  1. janus

    janus Guest

    Hello All,

    Sorry for adding noise to this group, however I am in need of an
    Advanced C book. There was a time I accidently stumbled on one on the
    web, it has five chapters with the last on writing web server. Could
    someone give me the pointer or link to it? And I won't mind other
    books.

    Regards,
    Janus
     
    janus, Dec 2, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On 2 Dec 2009 at 7:55, janus wrote:
    > Sorry for adding noise to this group,


    I wouldn't worry about that.

    The signal-to-noise ratio in this group is already abysmal, thanks to
    the "topicality" zealots.

    > however I am in need of an Advanced C book. There was a time I
    > accidently stumbled on one on the web, it has five chapters with the
    > last on writing web server. Could someone give me the pointer or link
    > to it? And I won't mind other books.


    I expect Richard Heath Field, who has a history of spamming this group
    with advertisements for his book, will be along soon to recommend it.
    I'd avoid it - it contains elementary mistakes, and has shown himself to
    be too proud to accept error reports.

    Really, it depends what you're after. Once you've learned the basics of
    C, there are a whole lot of different directions you can pursue - with C
    in your pocket, the world is your oyster.

    By far and away the most important thing to learn if you're going to do
    serious programming is some standard basic algorithms and data
    structures. Besides Knuth (which many people don't find easy to
    read...), there is Corman, Rivest et al's book, which is exceptionally
    clear and has quite a lot of stuff in it. It's all pseudocode, so it
    would be an additional challenge to work out for yourself how to go
    about implementing things in C: if you want to create a binary tree, how
    should you deal with allocating the nodes? That sort of thing.

    Another good book on algorithms but with more help on implementation
    details is "Algorithms in C" by Sedgwick.

    Alternatively, you may be interesting in using C to write a
    sophisticated application that uses IPC or threading or networking or
    the like. In that case, "Unix systems programming" by Robbins and
    Robbins is a very good general introduction. For more hardcore
    networking, there are some thick tomes by Stevens that are standard -
    you mention writing a webserver, so that might be what you need.

    Maybe you want to write GUI apps: in that case, you need to pick a
    toolkit you like, which will probably be GTK if you're coding in C. I
    don't know a good book to recommend, but there's excellent tutorial and
    reference information accessible online from GTK's website.

    Or you might be interested in applying C to lower-level programming at
    the kernel level. "Understanding the Linux Kernel" by someone I can't
    remember and "Essential Linux Device Drivers" by Venteswaran are both
    readable.

    Really, the possibilities are endless, and if you say what sort of thing
    you're particularly interested in then people will surely have lots of
    good suggestions to make.
     
    Antoninus Twink, Dec 2, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On 2 Dec, 19:19, Antoninus Twink <> wrote:
    > On  2 Dec 2009 at  7:55, janus wrote:


    > > Sorry for adding noise to this group,

    >
    > I wouldn't worry about that.


    quite right!

    > The signal-to-noise ratio in this group is already abysmal, thanks to
    > the "topicality" zealots.


    and the people who keep arguing about it...


    > > however I am in need of an Advanced C book. There was a time I
    > > accidently stumbled on one on the web, it has five chapters with the
    > > last on writing web server. Could someone give me the pointer or link
    > > to it? And I won't mind other books.


    I think you'd need to define what you by "Advanced C book". Do you
    want to know more about the C language (you can't really beat K&R) or
    programming in some particular domain (eg. web servers or graphics) or
    some platform (Windows or Unix)?

    > I expect Richard Heath Field,


    that's HeathField


    > who has a history of spamming this group
    > with advertisements for his book,


    this is not true


    > will be along soon to recommend it.
    > I'd avoid it - it contains elementary mistakes, and has shown himself to
    > be too proud to accept error reports.


    not true either. The book is pretty good and covers a wide variety of
    C applications. OTOH tt is rather large and I think out of print. [I
    have no financial interest in the book]

    After this Twink settles down and gives some pretty good advice.

    > Really, it depends what you're after. Once you've learned the basics of
    > C, there are a whole lot of different directions you can pursue - with C
    > in your pocket, the world is your oyster.
    >
    > By far and away the most important thing to learn if you're going to do
    > serious programming is some standard basic algorithms and data
    > structures.  Besides Knuth (which many people don't find easy to
    > read...), there is Corman, Rivest et al's book, which is exceptionally
    > clear and has quite a lot of stuff in it. It's all pseudocode, so it
    > would be an additional challenge to work out for yourself how to go
    > about implementing things in C: if you want to create a binary tree, how
    > should you deal with allocating the nodes? That sort of thing.
    >
    > Another good book on algorithms but with more help on implementation
    > details is "Algorithms in C" by Sedgwick.
    >
    > Alternatively, you may be interesting in using C to write a
    > sophisticated application that uses IPC or threading or networking or
    > the like. In that case, "Unix systems programming" by Robbins and
    > Robbins is a very good general introduction. For more hardcore
    > networking, there are some thick tomes by Stevens that are standard -
    > you mention writing a webserver, so that might be what you need.
    >
    > Maybe you want to write GUI apps: in that case, you need to pick a
    > toolkit you like, which will probably be GTK if you're coding in C. I
    > don't know a good book to recommend, but there's excellent tutorial and
    > reference information accessible online from GTK's website.
    >
    > Or you might be interested in applying C to lower-level programming at
    > the kernel level. "Understanding the Linux Kernel" by someone I can't
    > remember and "Essential Linux Device Drivers" by Venteswaran are both
    > readable.
    >
    > Really, the possibilities are endless, and if you say what sort of thing
    > you're particularly interested in then people will surely have lots of
    > good suggestions to make.
     
    Nick Keighley, Dec 3, 2009
    #3
  4. janus

    Walter Banks Guest

    janus wrote:

    > Hello All,
    >
    > Sorry for adding noise to this group, however I am in need of an
    > Advanced C book. There was a time I accidently stumbled on one on the
    > web, it has five chapters with the last on writing web server. Could
    > someone give me the pointer or link to it? And I won't mind other
    > books.


    One of the books with the most wear on my shelves is
    "C a Reference Manual" by Harbison and Steele currently in
    fifth edition. I have earlier editions that the pages are warn
    and falling out


    "C a Reference Manual"
    Harbison and Steele
    (c) 2002 Prentice Hall
    ISBN 0-13-089592-X

    This is a very readable text written by knowledgeable authors
    that care about the material and should be encouraged .

    ll the best of the season,


    Walter..
    --
    Walter Banks
    Byte Craft Limited
    http://www.bytecraft.com
     
    Walter Banks, Dec 3, 2009
    #4
  5. janus

    Walter Banks Guest

    The support website for "C a Reference Manual" with
    errata and book description is

    http://www.careferencemanual.com/

    Walter..

    Walter Banks wrote:

    > janus wrote:
    >
    > > Hello All,
    > >
    > > Sorry for adding noise to this group, however I am in need of an
    > > Advanced C book. There was a time I accidently stumbled on one on the
    > > web, it has five chapters with the last on writing web server. Could
    > > someone give me the pointer or link to it? And I won't mind other
    > > books.

    >
    > One of the books with the most wear on my shelves is
    > "C a Reference Manual" by Harbison and Steele currently in
    > fifth edition. I have earlier editions that the pages are warn
    > and falling out
    >
    > "C a Reference Manual"
    > Harbison and Steele
    > (c) 2002 Prentice Hall
    > ISBN 0-13-089592-X
    >
    > This is a very readable text written by knowledgeable authors
    > that care about the material and should be encouraged .
    >
    > ll the best of the season,
    >
    > Walter..
    > --
    > Walter Banks
    > Byte Craft Limited
    > http://www.bytecraft.com
     
    Walter Banks, Dec 3, 2009
    #5
  6. On 3 Dec, 14:54, Walter Banks <> wrote:
    > janus wrote:



    > > Sorry for adding noise to this group,


    this qualifies as signal!


    > > however I am in need of an
    > > Advanced C book. There was a time I accidently stumbled on one on the
    > > web, it has five chapters with the last on writing web server. Could
    > > someone give me the pointer or link to it? And I won't mind other
    > > books.

    >
    > One of the books with the most wear on my shelves is
    > "C a Reference Manual"  by Harbison and Steele currently in
    > fifth edition. I have earlier editions that the pages are warn
    > and falling out
    >
    > "C a Reference Manual"
    > Harbison and Steele
    > (c) 2002 Prentice Hall
    > ISBN 0-13-089592-X
    >
    > This is a very readable text written by knowledgeable authors
    > that care about the material and should be encouraged .


    ah yes. My old H&S was better for the library than K&R (IMO). I
    believe the new H&S covers C99 which K&R doesn't.

    I wouldn't classify it as an "advanced" book though- whatever one of
    those is!
     
    Nick Keighley, Dec 3, 2009
    #6
  7. On 3 Dec 2009 at 10:58, Richard Heathfield wrote:
    > Nick Keighley wrote:
    > Actually it's "Heathfield" - but he's been told many times, and he
    > still can't get it right. What did you expect?


    I will spell your name however I like if I feel it adds emphasis to what
    I'm saying.

    If you believe you deserve to have your named spelled correctly as a
    mark of respect, then you might like to think about doing something to
    start earning that respect.

    >>> who has a history of spamming this group with advertisements for his
    >>> book,

    >>
    >> this is not true

    >
    > In fact, it's a lie.


    Wrong.

    It is 100% true. Han from China dug out the quotes. Of course, you
    ignored this inconvenient evidence.

    In exactly the same way, when I posted a direct example of you
    introducing the bible into a recent thread to refute your claim that you
    don't bring religion into clc, the silence was deafening.

    On the one side, there is concrete evidence - your own words in your own
    posts.

    On the other side, there is nothing but mud slinging and accusations of
    lies.

    > I have almost never mentioned it


    "Almost". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Avoid_weasel_words

    > in a thread where someone else did not mention it first


    Exceptions, qualifications. Weasel words.

    > and, very often, when I have mentioned it,


    Self-justification. Weasel words.

    You're on the hook and you know it. There's no way to wriggle off,
    Heathfield.

    > It is certainly true, however, that I pay very little attention to
    > idiots. And it is possible that an idiot, despite his idiocy, might
    > spot a genuine error that has not been spotted previously by others.


    There are many words you could use to describe Han. "Idiot" is not one
    of them.

    Besides, other people read and confirmed the errors Han found. You still
    ignored them, because of their original source.

    In my book, that is intellectual dishonesty of the highest order.

    > I have two choices - read everything posted by every idiot, or run the
    > (very low) risk of missing an error report.


    Given that you read everything posted by spinoza, that argument hardly
    carries much force, does it?

    > I think the risk is worth running.


    Of course you do. But then you're breathtakingly arrogant and care more
    about pursuing personal vendettas than you do about technical
    correctness, for all your ostentatious displays of pedantry.

    > I don't think size is necessarily a disadvantage.


    Indeed. The bigger it is, the longer it keeps you warm when it's used as
    fuel.
     
    Antoninus Twink, Dec 3, 2009
    #7
  8. On 3 Dec 2009 at 19:05, Tim Streater wrote:
    > On 03/12/2009 18:57, Antoninus Twink wrote:
    >> It is 100% true. Han from China dug out the quotes. Of course, you
    >> ignored this inconvenient evidence.

    >
    > No such person, Twinky.


    Are you mad? Check out
    http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.c/msg/c29809cd75412536

    Here's the relevant part. Let's see if Heathfield will address the
    evidence this time round - but fair-minded readers will quickly make up
    their minds for themselves about who exactly is the liar here.


    === begin HfC ===

    I've found *some* quotes (I have no idea how complete this list is) as
    evidence for my assertions. I realize Heathfield has denied the plugs in
    this thread, and to be fair, we shouldn't call that lying, since these
    posts were from many years ago, and nobody can be expected to remember
    all the details of what he posted to a newsgroup many years ago. The
    Heathfield from that time was actually a pretty likeable fellow.

    Richard Heathfield
    Oh dear. I can't exactly give you the Amazon link because it would be
    /too/ much like spam. Suffice to say that I just checked Amazon and it
    is indeed there. If you do a search for "Richard Heathfield" it finds
    it
    straight away. If you search using "C Unleashed" it's about five or
    six
    books down on the list.

    Richard Heathfield:
    I am reluctant to describe it in more detail here in case I lay myself
    open to the accusation of posting commercial material.* You can find a
    chapter list and author list at the URL I gave in my earlier reply.
    That
    should give you some idea of the contents and the quality (you'll
    recognise almost a dozen of the names, I suspect).

    [*Straw poll - do people here really object if my attempts to provide
    objective information about the book accidentally sound like "buy this
    book now", or am I being needlessly shy?]

    Here's a "humorous smiley one" one that involves you, Mr. Bos:

    Richard Bos wrote:
    > If it remains at the level it has been up to now, you're being
    > needlessly shy. I would object if they did sound like "buy this",
    > but
    > IMO, they haven't, yet. OTOH, maybe that's because IMO I need to get
    > around to buying the thing already.


    buy this

    :)

    --
    Richard Heathfield
    "Usenet is a strange place." - Dennis M Ritchie, 29 July 1999.
    C FAQ: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
    K&R Answers: http://users.powernet.co.uk/eton/kandr2/index.html

    Richard Heathfield:
    As for the C book: presuming you've already got K&R, H&S, and CPFAQs,
    I
    recommend that you grab a copy of... um... rats, I had exactly the
    book
    for you and I've gone and forgotten the title. Sorry.

    :)

    Just for fun, here's Nick Keighley, *after having posted to comp.lang.c
    for roughly a year*, lending himself to marketing:

    I keep hearing about a book "C Unleashed" and I believe some of the
    regulars contributed to it. Is it available online, as I don't want
    to pay for it?

    Hope this doesn't cause offence to anyone.

    And that again let Heathfield rattle on about his book in multiple
    posts.

    Here's a *direct* plug from yet another thread:

    Richard Heathfield:
    And, if I might add one to the list? :)

    C Unleashed, by Richard Heathfield, Lawrence Kirby, and (many!)
    others,
    including a few other comp.lang.c regulars; Sams (Macmillan Computer
    Publishing), 2000. ISBN 0-672-31896-2

    Not a bad book, as it turns out, (although you should be most
    suspicious
    of any chapters written by that Heathfield character). But not a book
    for beginners.

    followed by coyness and the obligatory apology:

    Richard Heathfield:
    <grimace> Well, I was under the impression that it was already on sale
    (in the USA). This doesn't seem to be backed up by anecdotal evidence
    (such as, for example, an actual purchase!). Macmillan have provided
    me
    with a wide range of dates, the latest of which was 18th August (i.e.
    last week), and this time they sounded kinda convinced. :)

    All I can tell you for /sure/ is that I do know that at least one
    paper
    copy of the book exists, because it's sitting on my desk right now.

    I think this is drifting off-topic now, so if you want any more info,
    I
    suggest that comp.lang.c might prefer it if we take the discussion to
    email.

    For some odd reason, there were plenty of bizarre plug openings from
    strangers to the newsgroup around 2000-2001. Here's an amusing one from
    someone calling himself "Peetah_junkmail":

    Hi,

    i tried to contact Richard Heathfield, one of the authors of C
    unleashed,
    through the mail provided on the web site of the book
    (http://users.powernet.co.uk/eton/unleashed/), but I've been granted
    with
    an unexisting username from the mail server.
    As this book has its origin in this group, I'm trying here .
    I have bought this big book one year ago, but it's really not
    compatible
    with the advantage of working with a lapop. Therefore I would like to
    know
    if there is a way to get a pdf version, given that I am able to
    provide a
    proof of purchase.

    Again sorry for being off topic, but as I don't want to leech on P2P
    networks for illegal copies, this place is my last chance.

    Thanks

    Peetah

    Here's another amusing opening from some fellow named "Carlo":

    I really like the book "C unleashed", but it's too heavy. If it will
    publish
    in "light-weighted-paper" version, I will buy it.

    Carlo

    The flurry of bizarre questions about the book was an odd phenomenon for
    a
    newsgroup. Certainly I haven't witnessed anything similar on the Perl,
    Python, C++, Java, or PHP newsgroups when regular contributors write a
    book or a new edition of a previous book. But I see no conclusive
    evidence
    of a marketing stunt, and the posters appear to have had a history on
    Usenet before asking for information.

    === end of HfC ===
     
    Antoninus Twink, Dec 3, 2009
    #8
  9. On 3 Dec 2009 at 19:40, Tim Streater wrote:
    > On 03/12/2009 19:14, Antoninus Twink wrote:
    >> http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.c/msg/c29809cd75412536
    >>
    >> Here's the relevant part. Let's see if Heathfield will addre...zzzz zzzz

    >
    > Zzzzzz zzzzz ... <yawn>


    If you find the evidence of Heathfield's long history of deceit and
    underhand behavior in this group so tedious, why did you ask about it in
    the first place?

    But of course you're right - the utter monotony with which we read
    Heathfield plugging his book time after time after time might easily
    send you to sleep if it failed to produce the anger and frustration that
    it should do, when he then comes along and says: "In fact, it's a lie. I
    have almost never mentioned it".

    There is only one liar here.
     
    Antoninus Twink, Dec 3, 2009
    #9
  10. janus

    janus Guest

    Thank you all. However, what I wanted is a book(s) that would enable
    me to have pointer/pointer function in my pocket and also support me
    in my drive to writing games. Basically, I would like to have a clear
    understanding of C.

    Janus
     
    janus, Dec 3, 2009
    #10
  11. janus

    Squeamizh Guest

    On Dec 3, 11:40 am, Tim Streater <> wrote:
    > On 03/12/2009 19:14, Antoninus Twink wrote:
    >
    > > On 3 Dec 2009 at 19:05, Tim Streater wrote:
    > >> On 03/12/2009 18:57, Antoninus Twink wrote:
    > >>> It is 100% true. Han from China dug out the quotes. Of course, you
    > >>> ignored this inconvenient evidence.

    >
    > >> No such person, Twinky.


    You make an assertion that flies in the face of reality here.

    >
    > > Are you mad? Check out
    > >http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.c/msg/c29809cd75412536

    >
    > > Here's the relevant part. Let's see if Heathfield will addre...zzzz zzzz

    >
    > Zzzzzz zzzzz ... <yawn>
    >
    > Wake us up when you have something interesting to say, Twinky.


    ....and then you dismiss the refutation to your claim because it isn't
    "interesting" enough. God damn, you're dumb.
     
    Squeamizh, Dec 3, 2009
    #11
  12. janus

    Seebs Guest

    On 2009-12-03, Nick Keighley <> wrote:
    > I think you'd need to define what you by "Advanced C book". Do you
    > want to know more about the C language (you can't really beat K&R)


    I actually think that King's _C Programming: A Modern Approach_ qualifies
    as beating K&R these days. Larger, more in-depth, and covers C99 features.
    (But distinguishes them, which I think is a win.)

    -s
    --
    Copyright 2009, all wrongs reversed. Peter Seebach /
    http://www.seebs.net/log/ <-- lawsuits, religion, and funny pictures
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_Game_(Scientology) <-- get educated!
     
    Seebs, Dec 3, 2009
    #12
  13. janus

    Seebs Guest

    On 2009-12-03, janus <> wrote:
    > Thank you all. However, what I wanted is a book(s) that would enable
    > me to have pointer/pointer function in my pocket and also support me
    > in my drive to writing games. Basically, I would like to have a clear
    > understanding of C.


    http://knking.com/books/c/

    Disclaimer: I did tech review for it. However, I don't get royalties, so
    I still don't have a financial interest in the book.

    -s
    --
    Copyright 2009, all wrongs reversed. Peter Seebach /
    http://www.seebs.net/log/ <-- lawsuits, religion, and funny pictures
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_Game_(Scientology) <-- get educated!
     
    Seebs, Dec 3, 2009
    #13
  14. janus

    Seebs Guest

    On 2009-12-03, Squeamizh <> wrote:
    > You make an assertion that flies in the face of reality here.


    Not demonstrably. No one has shown that such a person exists, as opposed
    to a sock.

    > ...and then you dismiss the refutation to your claim because it isn't
    > "interesting" enough. God damn, you're dumb.


    Actually, I think he's pretty much nailed it -- the babblings of our local
    community of trolls (at least some of whom are almost certainly socks, though
    it's hard to say for sure which ones) are pretty much a waste of time.

    *plonk*

    -s
    --
    Copyright 2009, all wrongs reversed. Peter Seebach /
    http://www.seebs.net/log/ <-- lawsuits, religion, and funny pictures
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_Game_(Scientology) <-- get educated!
     
    Seebs, Dec 3, 2009
    #14
  15. On 3 Dec 2009 at 21:32, Tim Streater wrote:
    > Why did I ask about what, O soppy one?


    Do you have a screw loose or something? You show every sign of being in
    a world of your own.
     
    Antoninus Twink, Dec 3, 2009
    #15
  16. Tim Streater <> writes:
    > On 03/12/2009 19:54, Antoninus Twink wrote:

    [SNIP]
    > Why did I ask about what, O soppy one?


    Please stop feeding the trolls.

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    Nokia
    "We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
    -- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
     
    Keith Thompson, Dec 3, 2009
    #16
  17. On 3 Dec 2009 at 21:39, Tim Streater wrote:
    > "As I recall", all I've asked about is who the f*** Han from China is
    > supposed to be. Some fathead suggested googling for him, all I got was
    > pages about the Han dynasty or some such.


    <http://groups.google.com/groups/search?num=100&as_sitesearch=&as_qdr=&as_mind=1&as_minm=1&as_miny=2009&as_maxd=1&as_maxm=1&as_maxy=2009&as_ugroup=comp.lang.c&as_uauthors=han+from+china>

    It's not rocket science.
     
    Antoninus Twink, Dec 3, 2009
    #17
  18. janus

    Eric Sosman Guest

    Tim Streater wrote:
    > On 03/12/2009 21:35, Antoninus Twink wrote:
    >> On 3 Dec 2009 at 21:32, Tim Streater wrote:
    >>> Why did I ask about what, O soppy one?

    >>
    >> Do you have a screw loose or something? You show every sign of being in
    >> a world of your own.

    >
    > "As I recall", all I've asked about is who the f*** Han from China is
    > supposed to be. Some fathead suggested googling for him, all I got was
    > pages about the Han dynasty or some such. But d'ye think I really care?
    >
    > However, feel free to continue to work yourself up into a froth, it's
    > quite amusing.


    You seem easily amused by repetition.

    --
    Eric Sosman
    lid
     
    Eric Sosman, Dec 3, 2009
    #18
  19. In article <>,
    Tim Streater <> wrote:
    ....
    >> ...and then you dismiss the refutation to your claim because it isn't
    >> "interesting" enough. God damn, you're dumb.

    >
    >Keep it coming, Sock, you're providing me with a chuckle.


    And vice versa.

    And note that the best part of this little teleplay is when skipper Kiki
    or little buddy first mate default loser Bwian comes along and inveighs
    you not to "feed the trools". I see that this has already happened. It
    may happen again.
     
    Kenny McCormack, Dec 3, 2009
    #19
  20. On 3 Dec, 19:14, Antoninus Twink <> wrote:

    <snip>

    > Just for fun, here's Nick Keighley, *after having posted to comp.lang.c
    > for roughly a year*,


    what was the date? I'm sure I'd been posting to clc for quite a while
    before Unleashed came out (though memory may fail me)

    > lending himself to marketing:
    >
    >   I keep hearing about a book "C Unleashed" and I believe some of the
    >   regulars contributed to it. Is it available online, as I don't want
    >   to pay for it?
    >
    >   Hope this doesn't cause offence to anyone.


    that *sounds* like i was being tongue in cheek. I don't believe in
    stealing intellectual property.

    <snip>
     
    Nick Keighley, Dec 4, 2009
    #20
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