ANN: Python training "text movies"

Discussion in 'Python' started by AK, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. AK

    AK Guest

    I don't know what to call these, so for now I'll call them "training
    text movies" until I come up with a better name..

    I hope these will be helpful, especially to new students of Python.

    http://lightbird.net/larks/tmovies.html


    I'll be adding more in the next few days...

    - mitya
     
    AK, Jan 13, 2013
    #1
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  2. On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 00:11:53 -0500, AK wrote:

    > I don't know what to call these, so for now I'll call them "training
    > text movies" until I come up with a better name..
    >
    > I hope these will be helpful, especially to new students of Python.
    >
    > http://lightbird.net/larks/tmovies.html



    For the benefit of those who don't have web access at the moment, or who
    don't like to click on random links they don't know anything about, would
    you like to say a few words describing what "text movies" are, and how
    you think these may be helpful?



    --
    Steven
     
    Steven D'Aprano, Jan 13, 2013
    #2
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  3. On 01/13/2013 01:35 AM, Steven D'Aprano wrote:
    > On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 00:11:53 -0500, AK wrote:
    >
    >> I don't know what to call these, so for now I'll call them "training
    >> text movies" until I come up with a better name..
    >>
    >> I hope these will be helpful, especially to new students of Python.
    >>
    >> http://lightbird.net/larks/tmovies.html

    >
    >
    > For the benefit of those who don't have web access at the moment, or who
    > don't like to click on random links they don't know anything about,

    would
    > you like to say a few words describing what "text movies" are, and how
    > you think these may be helpful?
    >
    >
    >



    Sure: they play back a list of instructions on use of string methods and
    list comprehensions along with demonstration in a mock-up of the
    interpreter with a different display effect for commands typed into (and
    printed out by) the interpeter. The speed can be changed and the
    playback can be paused.

    - mitya



    --
    Lark's Tongue Guide to Python: http://lightbird.net/larks/
     
    Mitya Sirenef, Jan 13, 2013
    #3
  4. AK

    Terry Reedy Guest

    On 1/13/2013 2:08 AM, Mitya Sirenef wrote:
    > On 01/13/2013 01:35 AM, Steven D'Aprano wrote:
    >> On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 00:11:53 -0500, AK wrote:
    > >
    > >> I don't know what to call these, so for now I'll call them "training
    > >> text movies" until I come up with a better name..
    > >>
    > >> I hope these will be helpful, especially to new students of Python.
    > >>
    > >> http://lightbird.net/larks/tmovies.html

    > >
    > >
    > > For the benefit of those who don't have web access at the moment, or who
    > > don't like to click on random links they don't know anything about,

    > would
    > > you like to say a few words describing what "text movies" are, and how
    > > you think these may be helpful?
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    > Sure: they play back a list of instructions on use of string methods and
    > list comprehensions along with demonstration in a mock-up of the
    > interpreter with a different display effect for commands typed into (and
    > printed out by) the interpeter. The speed can be changed and the
    > playback can be paused.


    They are simulated videos of an interactive interpreter session, with
    entered commands appearing all at once instead of char by char, and with
    the extra features mentioned above. I presume the purported advantage
    over an after-the-fact transcript is focusing watcher attention on each
    entry and response.

    --
    Terry Jan Reedy
     
    Terry Reedy, Jan 13, 2013
    #4
  5. On 01/13/2013 02:28 AM, Terry Reedy wrote:
    > On 1/13/2013 2:08 AM, Mitya Sirenef wrote:
    >> On 01/13/2013 01:35 AM, Steven D'Aprano wrote:
    >>> On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 00:11:53 -0500, AK wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> I don't know what to call these, so for now I'll call them "training
    >> >> text movies" until I come up with a better name..
    >> >>
    >> >> I hope these will be helpful, especially to new students of Python.
    >> >>
    >> >> http://lightbird.net/larks/tmovies.html
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > For the benefit of those who don't have web access at the moment,

    or who
    >> > don't like to click on random links they don't know anything about,

    >> would
    >> > you like to say a few words describing what "text movies" are, and how
    >> > you think these may be helpful?
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>
    >> Sure: they play back a list of instructions on use of string methods and
    >> list comprehensions along with demonstration in a mock-up of the
    >> interpreter with a different display effect for commands typed into (and
    >> printed out by) the interpeter. The speed can be changed and the
    >> playback can be paused.

    >
    > They are simulated videos of an interactive interpreter session, with
    > entered commands appearing all at once instead of char by char, and
    > with the extra features mentioned above. I presume the purported
    > advantage over an after-the-fact transcript is focusing watcher
    > attention on each entry and response.
    >


    That is right; I would also add that it may be overwhelming for a newbie
    to be reading through a large "wall of text" -- here you have blank
    space after the current paragraph so the attention is focused even more
    on the last few lines.

    Additionally, since instructions scroll automatically, I can space them
    out more than you would conventionally do in a manual.

    - mitya


    --
    Lark's Tongue Guide to Python: http://lightbird.net/larks/
     
    Mitya Sirenef, Jan 13, 2013
    #5
  6. In article <>,
    Jason Friedman <> wrote:

    > > That is right; I would also add that it may be overwhelming for a newbie
    > > to be reading through a large "wall of text" -- here you have blank
    > > space after the current paragraph so the attention is focused even more
    > > on the last few lines.
    > >
    > > Additionally, since instructions scroll automatically, I can space them
    > > out more than you would conventionally do in a manual.
    > >

    >
    > Pretty cool.


    When reading the source of the Web page which shows the scroll,
    I can't find the reference to the text displayed. Only "text"...
    How may we use the software which generates the Javascript ?
    Thanks, it's cool.

    franck
     
    Franck Ditter, Jan 14, 2013
    #6
  7. On 01/14/2013 01:34 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Jason Friedman <> wrote:
    >
    >>> That is right; I would also add that it may be overwhelming for a newbie
    >>> to be reading through a large "wall of text" -- here you have blank
    >>> space after the current paragraph so the attention is focused even more
    >>> on the last few lines.
    >>>
    >>> Additionally, since instructions scroll automatically, I can space them
    >>> out more than you would conventionally do in a manual.
    >>>

    >> Pretty cool.

    > When reading the source of the Web page which shows the scroll,
    > I can't find the reference to the text displayed. Only "text"...
    > How may we use the software which generates the Javascript ?
    > Thanks, it's cool.
    >
    > franck


    Thanks!

    the text is in var commands = ...

    You can download the generator script here:

    https://github.com/pythonbyexample/PBE/blob/master/code/jstmovie.py

    (you also need to grab tmovies dir)



    --
    Lark's Tongue Guide to Python: http://lightbird.net/larks/
     
    Mitya Sirenef, Jan 14, 2013
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:

    > On 01/14/2013 01:34 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    > > In article <>,
    > > Jason Friedman <> wrote:
    > >
    > >>> That is right; I would also add that it may be overwhelming for a newbie
    > >>> to be reading through a large "wall of text" -- here you have blank
    > >>> space after the current paragraph so the attention is focused even more
    > >>> on the last few lines.
    > >>>
    > >>> Additionally, since instructions scroll automatically, I can space them
    > >>> out more than you would conventionally do in a manual.
    > >>>
    > >> Pretty cool.

    > > When reading the source of the Web page which shows the scroll,
    > > I can't find the reference to the text displayed. Only "text"...
    > > How may we use the software which generates the Javascript ?
    > > Thanks, it's cool.
    > >
    > > franck

    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > the text is in var commands = ...
    >
    > You can download the generator script here:
    >
    > https://github.com/pythonbyexample/PBE/blob/master/code/jstmovie.py
    >
    > (you also need to grab tmovies dir)


    When looking at the source of the page :
    http://lightbird.net/larks/tmovies/strings.html
    I find commands = []
    I can't guess where the strings displayed come from...

    franck
     
    Franck Ditter, Jan 19, 2013
    #8
  9. On 01/19/2013 04:32 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 01/14/2013 01:34 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Jason Friedman <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> That is right; I would also add that it may be overwhelming for a newbie
    >>>>> to be reading through a large "wall of text" -- here you have blank
    >>>>> space after the current paragraph so the attention is focused even more
    >>>>> on the last few lines.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Additionally, since instructions scroll automatically, I can space them
    >>>>> out more than you would conventionally do in a manual.
    >>>>>
    >>>> Pretty cool.
    >>> When reading the source of the Web page which shows the scroll,
    >>> I can't find the reference to the text displayed. Only "text"...
    >>> How may we use the software which generates the Javascript ?
    >>> Thanks, it's cool.
    >>>
    >>> franck

    >> Thanks!
    >>
    >> the text is in var commands = ...
    >>
    >> You can download the generator script here:
    >>
    >> https://github.com/pythonbyexample/PBE/blob/master/code/jstmovie.py
    >>
    >> (you also need to grab tmovies dir)

    > When looking at the source of the page :
    > http://lightbird.net/larks/tmovies/strings.html
    > I find commands = []
    > I can't guess where the strings displayed come from...
    >
    > franck


    Look 10 lines below that line.


    I have also added a related page that allows you to paste your own
    text to make a movie; it's linked from the same page with the
    list of generated t-movies.

    (that page does not let you use typewriter effect or custom pauses
    though).

    - mitya



    --
    Lark's Tongue Guide to Python: http://lightbird.net/larks/
     
    Mitya Sirenef, Jan 19, 2013
    #9
  10. In article <>,
    Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:

    > On 01/19/2013 04:32 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    > > In article <>,
    > > Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> On 01/14/2013 01:34 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    > >>> In article <>,
    > >>> Jason Friedman <> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>>> That is right; I would also add that it may be overwhelming for a newbie
    > >>>>> to be reading through a large "wall of text" -- here you have blank
    > >>>>> space after the current paragraph so the attention is focused even more
    > >>>>> on the last few lines.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>> Additionally, since instructions scroll automatically, I can space them
    > >>>>> out more than you would conventionally do in a manual.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>> Pretty cool.
    > >>> When reading the source of the Web page which shows the scroll,
    > >>> I can't find the reference to the text displayed. Only "text"...
    > >>> How may we use the software which generates the Javascript ?
    > >>> Thanks, it's cool.
    > >>>
    > >>> franck
    > >> Thanks!
    > >>
    > >> the text is in var commands = ...
    > >>
    > >> You can download the generator script here:
    > >>
    > >> https://github.com/pythonbyexample/PBE/blob/master/code/jstmovie.py
    > >>
    > >> (you also need to grab tmovies dir)

    > > When looking at the source of the page :
    > > http://lightbird.net/larks/tmovies/strings.html
    > > I find commands = []
    > > I can't guess where the strings displayed come from...
    > >
    > > franck

    >
    > Look 10 lines below that line.
    >
    >
    > I have also added a related page that allows you to paste your own
    > text to make a movie; it's linked from the same page with the
    > list of generated t-movies.
    >
    > (that page does not let you use typewriter effect or custom pauses
    > though).
    >
    > - mitya


    I'm probably blind but 10 line after the line "commands = []", I find :

    var commands = [
    [
    "text",
    " "
    ],
    [
    "text",
    " "
    ],
    ....]

    but nothing concrete ! How come ?

    franck
     
    Franck Ditter, Jan 20, 2013
    #10
  11. In article <>,
    Franck Ditter <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:
    >
    > > On 01/19/2013 04:32 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    > > > In article <>,
    > > > Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> On 01/14/2013 01:34 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    > > >>> In article <>,
    > > >>> Jason Friedman <> wrote:
    > > >>>
    > > >>>>> That is right; I would also add that it may be overwhelming for a newbie
    > > >>>>> to be reading through a large "wall of text" -- here you have blank
    > > >>>>> space after the current paragraph so the attention is focused even more
    > > >>>>> on the last few lines.
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>> Additionally, since instructions scroll automatically, I can space them
    > > >>>>> out more than you would conventionally do in a manual.
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>> Pretty cool.
    > > >>> When reading the source of the Web page which shows the scroll,
    > > >>> I can't find the reference to the text displayed. Only "text"...
    > > >>> How may we use the software which generates the Javascript ?
    > > >>> Thanks, it's cool.
    > > >>>
    > > >>> franck
    > > >> Thanks!
    > > >>
    > > >> the text is in var commands = ...
    > > >>
    > > >> You can download the generator script here:
    > > >>
    > > >> https://github.com/pythonbyexample/PBE/blob/master/code/jstmovie.py
    > > >>
    > > >> (you also need to grab tmovies dir)
    > > > When looking at the source of the page :
    > > > http://lightbird.net/larks/tmovies/strings.html
    > > > I find commands = []
    > > > I can't guess where the strings displayed come from...
    > > >
    > > > franck

    > >
    > > Look 10 lines below that line.
    > >
    > >
    > > I have also added a related page that allows you to paste your own
    > > text to make a movie; it's linked from the same page with the
    > > list of generated t-movies.
    > >
    > > (that page does not let you use typewriter effect or custom pauses
    > > though).
    > >
    > > - mitya

    >
    > I'm probably blind but 10 line after the line "commands = []", I find :
    >
    > var commands = [
    > [
    > "text",
    > " "
    > ],
    > [
    > "text",
    > " "
    > ],
    > ....]
    >
    > but nothing concrete ! How come ?
    >
    > franck


    OK OK found ! Thanks.

    franck
     
    Franck Ditter, Jan 20, 2013
    #11
  12. In article <>,
    Franck Ditter <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Franck Ditter <> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>,
    > > Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:
    > >
    > > > On 01/19/2013 04:32 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    > > > > In article <>,
    > > > > Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > >> On 01/14/2013 01:34 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    > > > >>> In article <>,
    > > > >>> Jason Friedman <> wrote:
    > > > >>>
    > > > >>>>> That is right; I would also add that it may be overwhelming for a newbie
    > > > >>>>> to be reading through a large "wall of text" -- here you have blank
    > > > >>>>> space after the current paragraph so the attention is focused even more
    > > > >>>>> on the last few lines.
    > > > >>>>>
    > > > >>>>> Additionally, since instructions scroll automatically, I can space them
    > > > >>>>> out more than you would conventionally do in a manual.
    > > > >>>>>
    > > > >>>> Pretty cool.
    > > > >>> When reading the source of the Web page which shows the scroll,
    > > > >>> I can't find the reference to the text displayed. Only "text"...
    > > > >>> How may we use the software which generates the Javascript ?
    > > > >>> Thanks, it's cool.
    > > > >>>
    > > > >>> franck
    > > > >> Thanks!
    > > > >>
    > > > >> the text is in var commands = ...
    > > > >>
    > > > >> You can download the generator script here:
    > > > >>
    > > > >> https://github.com/pythonbyexample/PBE/blob/master/code/jstmovie.py
    > > > >>
    > > > >> (you also need to grab tmovies dir)
    > > > > When looking at the source of the page :
    > > > > http://lightbird.net/larks/tmovies/strings.html
    > > > > I find commands = []
    > > > > I can't guess where the strings displayed come from...
    > > > >
    > > > > franck
    > > >
    > > > Look 10 lines below that line.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > I have also added a related page that allows you to paste your own
    > > > text to make a movie; it's linked from the same page with the
    > > > list of generated t-movies.
    > > >
    > > > (that page does not let you use typewriter effect or custom pauses
    > > > though).
    > > >
    > > > - mitya

    > >
    > > I'm probably blind but 10 line after the line "commands = []", I find :
    > >
    > > var commands = [
    > > [
    > > "text",
    > > " "
    > > ],
    > > [
    > > "text",
    > > " "
    > > ],
    > > ....]
    > >
    > > but nothing concrete ! How come ?
    > >
    > > franck

    >
    > OK OK found ! Thanks.
    >
    > franck


    When executing jstmovie.py, it complains :
    'template.html' not found in tmovies...

    franck

    tmovies/template.html
     
    Franck Ditter, Jan 20, 2013
    #12
  13. On 01/20/2013 12:54 PM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Franck Ditter <> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <>,
    >> Franck Ditter <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On 01/19/2013 04:32 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    >>>>> In article <>,
    >>>>> Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On 01/14/2013 01:34 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    >>>>>>> In article <>,
    >>>>>>> Jason Friedman <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> That is right; I would also add that it may be overwhelming

    for a newbie
    >>>>>>>>> to be reading through a large "wall of text" -- here you have

    blank
    >>>>>>>>> space after the current paragraph so the attention is focused

    even more
    >>>>>>>>> on the last few lines.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Additionally, since instructions scroll automatically, I can

    space them
    >>>>>>>>> out more than you would conventionally do in a manual.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Pretty cool.
    >>>>>>> When reading the source of the Web page which shows the scroll,
    >>>>>>> I can't find the reference to the text displayed. Only "text"...
    >>>>>>> How may we use the software which generates the Javascript ?
    >>>>>>> Thanks, it's cool.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> franck
    >>>>>> Thanks!
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> the text is in var commands = ...
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> You can download the generator script here:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> https://github.com/pythonbyexample/PBE/blob/master/code/jstmovie.py
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> (you also need to grab tmovies dir)
    >>>>> When looking at the source of the page :
    >>>>> http://lightbird.net/larks/tmovies/strings.html
    >>>>> I find commands = []
    >>>>> I can't guess where the strings displayed come from...
    >>>>>
    >>>>> franck
    >>>>
    >>>> Look 10 lines below that line.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I have also added a related page that allows you to paste your own
    >>>> text to make a movie; it's linked from the same page with the
    >>>> list of generated t-movies.
    >>>>
    >>>> (that page does not let you use typewriter effect or custom pauses
    >>>> though).
    >>>>
    >>>> - mitya
    >>>
    >>> I'm probably blind but 10 line after the line "commands = []", I find :
    >>>
    >>> var commands = [
    >>> [
    >>> "text",
    >>> " "
    >>> ],
    >>> [
    >>> "text",
    >>> " "
    >>> ],
    >>> ....]
    >>>
    >>> but nothing concrete ! How come ?
    >>>
    >>> franck

    >>
    >> OK OK found ! Thanks.
    >>
    >> franck

    >
    > When executing jstmovie.py, it complains :
    > 'template.html' not found in tmovies...
    >
    > franck
    >
    > tmovies/template.html


    As I've said upthread, you need to download tmovies dir from
    the same repository where jstmovie.py is located:

    https://github.com/pythonbyexample/PBE/tree/master/code/


    - mitya



    --
    Lark's Tongue Guide to Python: http://lightbird.net/larks/

    Admiration for a quality or an art can be so strong that it deters us from
    striving to possess it. Friedrich Nietzsche
     
    Mitya Sirenef, Jan 20, 2013
    #13
  14. On Sun, 20 Jan 2013 18:54:03 +0100, Franck Ditter wrote:

    [snip quoting NINE levels deep]

    > When executing jstmovie.py, it complains : 'template.html' not found in
    > tmovies...


    Please trim unnecessary quoted text out of your replies. We don't need to
    read page after page of irrelevant comments that we've already read
    before.

    Thank you.

    If there is more quoted text than new text you have written, or quoting
    exceeds 3, maybe 4 levels deep, then there probably is too much
    unnecessary quoting.


    --
    Steven
     
    Steven D'Aprano, Jan 20, 2013
    #14
  15. AK

    rusi Guest

    On Jan 13, 12:08 pm, Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:
    > Sure: they play back a list of instructions on use of string methods and
    > list comprehensions along with demonstration in a mock-up of the
    > interpreter with a different display effect for commands typed into (and
    > printed out by) the interpeter. The speed can be changed and the
    > playback can be paused.


    Hi Mitya.
    What do you use for making these 'text-movies'?
    [Asking after some googling]
     
    rusi, Jan 21, 2013
    #15
  16. Ok I can make my way with jstmovie. Some remarks and questions :

    - Use encoding='utf-8' inside open of method __init__ of class Tutorial
    in jstmovie.py. Otherwise foreign languages are stuck.

    - To use the software outside Python, we need to have proper indentation
    as real spaces. We should be able to distinguish Arial type for usual
    text and fixed font for code.

    - Should have some colors.

    Wadda wadda <b>yadda</b> # blue annotation

    Cool and useful software,

    franck
     
    Franck Ditter, Jan 21, 2013
    #16
  17. On 01/21/2013 02:30 AM, rusi wrote:
    > On Jan 13, 12:08 pm, Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:
    >> Sure: they play back a list of instructions on use of string methods and
    >> list comprehensions along with demonstration in a mock-up of the
    >> interpreter with a different display effect for commands typed into (and
    >> printed out by) the interpeter. The speed can be changed and the
    >> playback can be paused.

    >
    > Hi Mitya.
    > What do you use for making these 'text-movies'?
    > [Asking after some googling]


    I'm using this script:

    https://github.com/pythonbyexample/PBE/tree/master/jstmovie/

    sample source file is in tmovies/src/

    -m


    --
    Lark's Tongue Guide to Python: http://lightbird.net/larks/

    Depression is rage spread thin. George Santayana
     
    Mitya Sirenef, Jan 21, 2013
    #17
  18. On 01/21/2013 03:07 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    > Ok I can make my way with jstmovie. Some remarks and questions :
    >
    > - Use encoding='utf-8' inside open of method __init__ of class Tutorial
    > in jstmovie.py. Otherwise foreign languages are stuck.
    >
    > - To use the software outside Python, we need to have proper indentation
    > as real spaces. We should be able to distinguish Arial type for usual
    > text and fixed font for code.



    Not sure I understand about indentation.. You mean like wrapping
    everything in a textarea tag? Right now everything is in div,
    which leads to all spaces being compressed in html when viewed.

    >
    >
    > - Should have some colors.
    >
    > Wadda wadda <b>yadda</b> # blue annotation



    I'm thinking of possibly using something like ReStructured text
    and having css styles. Not sure yet.

    >
    >
    > Cool and useful software,
    >
    > franck




    Thanks!

    -m


    --
    Lark's Tongue Guide to Python: http://lightbird.net/larks/

    He who would learn to fly one day must first learn to stand and walk and
    run and climb and dance; one cannot fly into flying. Friedrich Nietzsche
     
    Mitya Sirenef, Jan 21, 2013
    #18
  19. On 01/21/2013 03:07 AM, Franck Ditter wrote:
    > Ok I can make my way with jstmovie. Some remarks and questions :
    >
    > - Use encoding='utf-8' inside open of method __init__ of class Tutorial
    > in jstmovie.py. Otherwise foreign languages are stuck.
    >


    Thanks, will fix this.. -m


    --
    Lark's Tongue Guide to Python: http://lightbird.net/larks/

    By nature's kindly disposition most questions which it is beyond a man's
    power to answer do not occur to him at all. George Santayana
     
    Mitya Sirenef, Jan 21, 2013
    #19
  20. In article <>,
    Mitya Sirenef <> wrote:

    > > - To use the software outside Python, we need to have proper indentation
    > > as real spaces. We should be able to distinguish Arial type for usual
    > > text and fixed font for code.

    >
    >
    > Not sure I understand about indentation.. You mean like wrapping
    > everything in a textarea tag? Right now everything is in div,
    > which leads to all spaces being compressed in html when viewed.


    SOme spaces are translated in &nbsp;, others in actual spaces.
    Say for Scheme, if I write this in foo.txt :

    > (define z (* 3+2i 1+i)) ; notation a+bi

    abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

    I get this in foo.html (spaces missing) :

    > (define z (* 3+2i 1+i))                 ; notation a+bi 

    abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 

    franck
     
    Franck Ditter, Jan 21, 2013
    #20
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