Book recommendation

Discussion in 'Python' started by Madhusudan Singh, Nov 24, 2004.

  1. Hi

    I am trying to teach myself Python. I have extensive prior programming
    experience in Fortran, a little in C/C++, Pascal, etc.

    So far, I have been reading online tutorials at www.python.org and a book I
    found at the library - Martin Brown's The Complete Reference Python. Is
    there a standard classic book to learn from that I could buy ?

    Say something like Metcalf and Reid's Fortran 90/95 Explained or Kernighan
    and Ritchie's The C Programming Language.
     
    Madhusudan Singh, Nov 24, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Madhusudan Singh

    StvB Guest

    There are four books I always recommend:
    1. The must-learn-Python-from-this-book book that I recommend is Diving
    Into Python by Mark Pilgrim

    1a. Then, you think of your own small/medium-size project, and start
    writing it.

    Now that you have been introduced in a friendly and painfree way,
    from Diving Into Python, and you're pumped emotionally
    from actually writing Python(1a) , start reading:

    2. O'Reilly's Learning Python, to really drive in the
    language syntax and features, and have a
    comprehensive, well-organized book on every part of Python,
    ready to check back to, when you need a lot of help on a particular
    topic.
    Just read it front and back, when you get the chance.

    And these two books are a must, IMO
    3. Python in a Nutshell
    4. Python Cookbook <-- avail online too, though



    "Madhusudan Singh" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi
    >
    > I am trying to teach myself Python. I have extensive prior programming
    > experience in Fortran, a little in C/C++, Pascal, etc.
    >
    > So far, I have been reading online tutorials at www.python.org and a book
    > I
    > found at the library - Martin Brown's The Complete Reference Python. Is
    > there a standard classic book to learn from that I could buy ?
    >
    > Say something like Metcalf and Reid's Fortran 90/95 Explained or Kernighan
    > and Ritchie's The C Programming Language.
    >
    >
     
    StvB, Nov 24, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Madhusudan Singh

    Paul Robson Guest

    On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 22:21:34 -0500, Madhusudan Singh wrote:

    > I am trying to teach myself Python. I have extensive prior programming
    > experience in Fortran, a little in C/C++, Pascal, etc.
    >
    > So far, I have been reading online tutorials at www.python.org and a book I
    > found at the library - Martin Brown's The Complete Reference Python. Is
    > there a standard classic book to learn from that I could buy ?
    >
    > Say something like Metcalf and Reid's Fortran 90/95 Explained or Kernighan
    > and Ritchie's The C Programming Language.


    Hi there Madhusudan :)

    There's a couple of brief introductions worth reading ; one is by the
    language's creator Guido van Rossum, and the other by a chap called
    Swaroop (A byte of Python I think it's called). Both of these are quick
    read introduction type things.

    A most entertaining and completely backward book is "Dive into Python"
    (all these are free downloads but you can buy the latter as a book) which
    has the approach where each section starts of with a relatively
    complex working chunk of Python code, then pulls it apart and shows you
    how all the bits work, and explains the various concepts as you go along.

    Once you've done that, if you want some useful bits of coding just to get
    the feel of it, try answering some of the Perl or Ruby Quiz-of-the-week
    questions (archives are online search for Perl|Ruby quiz of the week).

    None of the tasks are more than a page or two of python, but it's a quick
    way of getting a feel for the language.

    The other thing that's handy to have to hand is the Quick Reference which
    is about 20 or so pages and handy for a quick look up.

    There are many IDEs and Editors about from the quick and dirty through to
    full IDEs (which personally I find too much of a clutter). I personally
    like Scite which is the former.

    Remember, for i in range(100): print "Murali chucks" :)
     
    Paul Robson, Nov 24, 2004
    #3
  4. Madhusudan Singh

    Larry Bates Guest

    If you are running on Windows, "Python Programming on Win32"
    is a must buy/read.

    I also liked "Python Bible" a lot.

    Larry Bates

    Madhusudan Singh wrote:
    > Hi
    >
    > I am trying to teach myself Python. I have extensive prior programming
    > experience in Fortran, a little in C/C++, Pascal, etc.
    >
    > So far, I have been reading online tutorials at www.python.org and a book I
    > found at the library - Martin Brown's The Complete Reference Python. Is
    > there a standard classic book to learn from that I could buy ?
    >
    > Say something like Metcalf and Reid's Fortran 90/95 Explained or Kernighan
    > and Ritchie's The C Programming Language.
    >
    >
     
    Larry Bates, Nov 24, 2004
    #4
  5. Paul Robson wrote:

    > On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 22:21:34 -0500, Madhusudan Singh wrote:
    >
    >> I am trying to teach myself Python. I have extensive prior programming
    >> experience in Fortran, a little in C/C++, Pascal, etc.
    >>
    >> So far, I have been reading online tutorials at www.python.org and a book
    >> I found at the library - Martin Brown's The Complete Reference Python. Is
    >> there a standard classic book to learn from that I could buy ?
    >>
    >> Say something like Metcalf and Reid's Fortran 90/95 Explained or
    >> Kernighan and Ritchie's The C Programming Language.

    >
    > Hi there Madhusudan :)
    >


    Hi :)

    > There's a couple of brief introductions worth reading ; one is by the
    > language's creator Guido van Rossum, and the other by a chap called
    > Swaroop (A byte of Python I think it's called). Both of these are quick
    > read introduction type things.
    >
    > A most entertaining and completely backward book is "Dive into Python"
    > (all these are free downloads but you can buy the latter as a book) which
    > has the approach where each section starts of with a relatively
    > complex working chunk of Python code, then pulls it apart and shows you
    > how all the bits work, and explains the various concepts as you go along.
    >


    "Dive into Python" seems to be the favorite so far in this NG.

    > Once you've done that, if you want some useful bits of coding just to get
    > the feel of it, try answering some of the Perl or Ruby Quiz-of-the-week
    > questions (archives are online search for Perl|Ruby quiz of the week).


    perl-qotw was interesting and language agnostic (If perl can do something,
    so should Python - not that I know much perl). I will look into it on a
    regular basis when I get my bearings.

    >
    > None of the tasks are more than a page or two of python, but it's a quick
    > way of getting a feel for the language.
    >
    > The other thing that's handy to have to hand is the Quick Reference which
    > is about 20 or so pages and handy for a quick look up.


    Yep.

    >
    > There are many IDEs and Editors about from the quick and dirty through to
    > full IDEs (which personally I find too much of a clutter). I personally
    > like Scite which is the former.


    I use emacs for everything except authoring webpages. An operating system
    disguised as an editor :)

    >
    > Remember, for i in range(100): print "Murali chucks" :)


    The above is syntactically correct only if you did not install
    python-larry :)
     
    Madhusudan Singh, Nov 24, 2004
    #5
  6. Larry Bates wrote:

    > If you are running on Windows, "Python Programming on Win32"
    > is a must buy/read.
    >


    Thanks for your response. Fortunately, I inhabit a windows free world :)

    > I also liked "Python Bible" a lot.


    I will look into it.
     
    Madhusudan Singh, Nov 24, 2004
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Stefan Hellberg

    Book recommendation - Application Architecture!

    Stefan Hellberg, Jul 9, 2003, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    424
    Kevin Spencer
    Jul 9, 2003
  2. John Smith Jr.

    Book recommendation

    John Smith Jr., Jan 12, 2004, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    405
    Alvin Bruney
    Jan 15, 2004
  3. Griff

    Book recommendation

    Griff, Jun 24, 2004, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    364
  4. Saul
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    352
    Zenobia
    Jun 25, 2004
  5. Jason Williard

    Book Recommendation Request: VB.NET & C#.NET

    Jason Williard, Sep 21, 2004, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    410
    Brian Bischof
    Sep 22, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page