Bug tracking system recommendation

Discussion in 'Java' started by elektrophyte, Sep 2, 2005.

  1. elektrophyte

    elektrophyte Guest

    My organization is looking for a Web-based bug tracking system that can
    run on Linux and uses either MySQL or Oracle. It doesn't matter too
    much what language it's written in, though either Java or something
    that doesn't require an interpreter would be preferred over Perl or
    PHP. We're looking for something that can be installed easily without a
    long period of struggling to get a lot of interdependant components
    working together. We don't have a lot of extra time available for a
    long process of installing and / or maintaining the system. On the
    other hand, we definitely don't want a hosted solution. We prefer to
    keep it in-house.

    Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. I know that a lot of
    people use Bugzilla, but my sense is that it's more appropriate for
    large shops and technically-skilled users. We just have a few people
    who will be using the system. Some of the people reporting bugs will
    not be engineers and would probably be intimidated by a very complex
    UI.

    Thanks in advance for any help with this question.

    E
     
    elektrophyte, Sep 2, 2005
    #1
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  2. elektrophyte

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "elektrophyte" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My organization is looking for a Web-based bug tracking system that can
    > run on Linux and uses either MySQL or Oracle. It doesn't matter too
    > much what language it's written in, though either Java or something
    > that doesn't require an interpreter would be preferred over Perl or
    > PHP.


    It might be worth clarifying the above statement; the reasons one has
    for avoiding an interpreter is usually also reasons to avoid Java.

    > We're looking for something that can be installed easily without a
    > long period of struggling to get a lot of interdependant components
    > working together. We don't have a lot of extra time available for a
    > long process of installing and / or maintaining the system. On the
    > other hand, we definitely don't want a hosted solution. We prefer to
    > keep it in-house.


    In my experience, setting up Apache with JSP was a lot more troublesome
    than setting up Apache with PHP and MySQL. YMMV.

    > Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. I know that a lot of
    > people use Bugzilla, but my sense is that it's more appropriate for
    > large shops and technically-skilled users. We just have a few people
    > who will be using the system. Some of the people reporting bugs will
    > not be engineers and would probably be intimidated by a very complex
    > UI.


    Assuming these non-engineers are employees of your shop, it doesn't seem
    unreasonable to spend an hour or two as a "training" session to explain how
    to fill out the bug report form on Bugzilla. Regardless of what software
    you'll use, you'd probably get optimal use out of it if you do spend a few
    hours training the non-engineers: they might not know how to write effective
    bug reports! Make sure they're aware of the 3 basic pieces of information
    that make a bug report useful:

    1) How do you reproduce the bug?
    2) What did you expect to see?
    3) What did you see instead?

    Without some informal training (reading the above list may be considered
    sufficient "informal training"), the bug reporters might end up just
    submitting hard to understand bug reports anyway.

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Sep 2, 2005
    #2
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  3. elektrophyte

    Roedy Green Guest

    On 2 Sep 2005 11:49:19 -0700, "elektrophyte" <> wrote
    or quoted :

    >My organization is looking for a Web-based bug tracking system that can
    >run on Linux and uses either MySQL or Oracle. It doesn't matter too
    >much what language it's written in, though either Java or something
    >that doesn't require an interpreter would be preferred over Perl or
    >PHP. We're looking for something that can be installed easily without a
    >long period of struggling to get a lot of interdependant components
    >working together. We don't have a lot of extra time available for a
    >long process of installing and / or maintaining the system. On the
    >other hand, we definitely don't want a hosted solution. We prefer to
    >keep it in-house.


    check out Jira. It is not just bugs, but the entire project.
    see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jira.html


    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Again taking new Java programming contracts.
     
    Roedy Green, Sep 2, 2005
    #3
  4. elektrophyte

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Fri, 02 Sep 2005 19:56:49 GMT, "Oliver Wong" <>
    wrote or quoted :

    > It might be worth clarifying the above statement; the reasons one has
    >for avoiding an interpreter is usually also reasons to avoid Java.


    Java is not interpreted on the desktop, only in handhelds. It is
    JITed, natively statically complied, or hotspotted.

    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/compiler.html
    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Again taking new Java programming contracts.
     
    Roedy Green, Sep 2, 2005
    #4
  5. elektrophyte

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Fri, 02 Sep 2005 19:56:49 GMT, "Oliver Wong" <>
    wrote or quoted :

    >
    > Assuming these non-engineers are employees of your shop, it doesn't seem
    >unreasonable to spend an hour or two as a "training" session to explain how
    >to fill out the bug report form on Bugzilla. Regardless of what software
    >you'll use, you'd probably get optimal use out of it if you do spend a few
    >hours training the non-engineers: they might not know how to write effective
    >bug reports! Make sure they're aware of the 3 basic pieces of information
    >that make a bug report useful:


    I wonder if it might pay developers to have a log feature to help in
    tracking bugs. It would take a snapshot of the registry and data files
    and bundle them up in a zip, then log keystrokes and mouse clicks and
    moves (possibly abbreviating moves). Then the vendor would have an a
    way of knowing exactly what the user did and where he started from.
    Maybe there might be a way to get a screen snap even after the app has
    crashed.

    In the old days of DOS/Abundance I did a screen snap, stack trace,
    crucial application info -- e.g. what variable it was working on in
    what array in what file and error message to printer (or virtual
    printer) so that they would have something concrete to send me without
    any work on their part to copy. Now we have high speed Internet, we
    should be exploiting that rather than relying on users to tell us what
    happened.

    The other tool I have not seen used is something like PCAnywhere where
    the vendor and customer watch simultaneously as the customer causes
    the problem.

    I have found vendors much more willing to take action if accompanied
    by a screen shot. That is much more compelling proof there is a
    problem than any number of words.

    This brings up one of my pet peeves, error message filled with hex and
    other gibberish you cannot copy/paste to give to the vendor. Copying
    this to paper and transcribing is time consuming and introduces
    errors.


    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Again taking new Java programming contracts.
     
    Roedy Green, Sep 2, 2005
    #5
  6. elektrophyte

    Neill Guest

    "elektrophyte" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My organization is looking for a Web-based bug tracking system that can
    > run on Linux and uses either MySQL or Oracle. It doesn't matter too
    > much what language it's written in, though either Java or something
    > that doesn't require an interpreter would be preferred over Perl or
    > PHP. We're looking for something that can be installed easily without a
    > long period of struggling to get a lot of interdependant components
    > working together. We don't have a lot of extra time available for a
    > long process of installing and / or maintaining the system. On the
    > other hand, we definitely don't want a hosted solution. We prefer to
    > keep it in-house.
    >
    > Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. I know that a lot of
    > people use Bugzilla, but my sense is that it's more appropriate for
    > large shops and technically-skilled users. We just have a few people
    > who will be using the system. Some of the people reporting bugs will
    > not be engineers and would probably be intimidated by a very complex
    > UI.
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any help with this question.
    >
    > E
    >


    Take a look a FogBugz at http://www.fogcreek.com/

    I've been reading Joel for a long time, and like his views on software
    development.


    --

    Neill Laney
    http://www.laneyconsulting.com
     
    Neill, Sep 3, 2005
    #6
  7. elektrophyte wrote:
    > My organization is looking for a Web-based bug tracking system that can
    > run on Linux and uses either MySQL or Oracle. It doesn't matter too
    > much what language it's written in, though either Java or something
    > that doesn't require an interpreter would be preferred over Perl or
    > PHP. We're looking for something that can be installed easily without a
    > long period of struggling to get a lot of interdependant components
    > working together. We don't have a lot of extra time available for a
    > long process of installing and / or maintaining the system. On the
    > other hand, we definitely don't want a hosted solution. We prefer to
    > keep it in-house.
    >
    > Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. I know that a lot of
    > people use Bugzilla, but my sense is that it's more appropriate for
    > large shops and technically-skilled users. We just have a few people
    > who will be using the system. Some of the people reporting bugs will
    > not be engineers and would probably be intimidated by a very complex
    > UI.
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any help with this question.
    >
    > E
    >


    go with JIRA - its great.

    http://www.atlassian.com/software/jira/
     
    Andrew McDonagh, Sep 3, 2005
    #7
  8. elektrophyte

    Virgil Green Guest

    elektrophyte wrote:
    > My organization is looking for a Web-based bug tracking system that
    > can run on Linux and uses either MySQL or Oracle. It doesn't matter
    > too much what language it's written in, though either Java or
    > something that doesn't require an interpreter would be preferred over
    > Perl or PHP. We're looking for something that can be installed easily
    > without a long period of struggling to get a lot of interdependant
    > components working together. We don't have a lot of extra time
    > available for a long process of installing and / or maintaining the
    > system. On the other hand, we definitely don't want a hosted
    > solution. We prefer to keep it in-house.
    >
    > Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. I know that a lot of
    > people use Bugzilla, but my sense is that it's more appropriate for
    > large shops and technically-skilled users. We just have a few people
    > who will be using the system. Some of the people reporting bugs will
    > not be engineers and would probably be intimidated by a very complex
    > UI.
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any help with this question.
    >
    > E


    Take a look at eventum. Developed and used by the mySQL group.

    http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/other/eventum/

    It, however, PHP-based.

    Also take a look at Mantis

    http://www.mantisbt.org/

    It is also PHP-based. However, both of these are free.

    --
    Virgil
     
    Virgil Green, Sep 3, 2005
    #8
  9. elektrophyte

    Chris Smith Guest

    Oliver Wong <> wrote:
    > > We're looking for something that can be installed easily without a
    > > long period of struggling to get a lot of interdependant components
    > > working together. We don't have a lot of extra time available for a
    > > long process of installing and / or maintaining the system. On the
    > > other hand, we definitely don't want a hosted solution. We prefer to
    > > keep it in-house.

    >
    > In my experience, setting up Apache with JSP was a lot more troublesome
    > than setting up Apache with PHP and MySQL. YMMV.


    Setting up Apache with JSP is undoubtedly more troublesome than setting
    up Apache with PHP. So why in the world would you set up Apache? This
    is just a bug tracking system, after all. I find that setting up Tomcat
    (and configuring it to speak HTTP directly) is actually easier than
    setting up Apache alone.

    On the other hand, if you're looking to handle extreme levels of mostly-
    static traffic or need something that Tomcat can't do easily (for
    example, URL rewriting or running a PHP app beside the bug tracking
    system), then Apache would probably be needed.

    > Assuming these non-engineers are employees of your shop, it doesn't seem
    > unreasonable to spend an hour or two as a "training" session to explain how
    > to fill out the bug report form on Bugzilla.


    One good reason might be that the bug reporting form in BugZilla assumes
    a lot of procedural stuff that smaller vendors simply won't use. I have
    often found myself in search of a smaller bug tracking system instead of
    handling the beast that is BugZilla.

    --
    www.designacourse.com
    The Easiest Way To Train Anyone... Anywhere.

    Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
    MindIQ Corporation
     
    Chris Smith, Sep 4, 2005
    #9
  10. Check CodeBeamer, it is integrated wit version control systems such as cvs,
    subversion, vss, pvcs etc.

    http://intland.com/products/codebeamer.html

    Zsolt

    "Neill" <> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:dMjSe.40425$...
    >
    > "elektrophyte" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> My organization is looking for a Web-based bug tracking system that can
    >> run on Linux and uses either MySQL or Oracle. It doesn't matter too
    >> much what language it's written in, though either Java or something
    >> that doesn't require an interpreter would be preferred over Perl or
    >> PHP. We're looking for something that can be installed easily without a
    >> long period of struggling to get a lot of interdependant components
    >> working together. We don't have a lot of extra time available for a
    >> long process of installing and / or maintaining the system. On the
    >> other hand, we definitely don't want a hosted solution. We prefer to
    >> keep it in-house.
    >>
    >> Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. I know that a lot of
    >> people use Bugzilla, but my sense is that it's more appropriate for
    >> large shops and technically-skilled users. We just have a few people
    >> who will be using the system. Some of the people reporting bugs will
    >> not be engineers and would probably be intimidated by a very complex
    >> UI.
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance for any help with this question.
    >>
    >> E
    >>

    >
    > Take a look a FogBugz at http://www.fogcreek.com/
    >
    > I've been reading Joel for a long time, and like his views on software
    > development.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Neill Laney
    > http://www.laneyconsulting.com
    >
    >
     
    Zsolt Koppany, Sep 4, 2005
    #10
  11. elektrophyte

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "Roedy Green" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 02 Sep 2005 19:56:49 GMT, "Oliver Wong" <>
    > wrote or quoted :
    >
    >> It might be worth clarifying the above statement; the reasons one has
    >>for avoiding an interpreter is usually also reasons to avoid Java.

    >
    > Java is not interpreted on the desktop, only in handhelds. It is
    > JITed, natively statically complied, or hotspotted.


    Relunctant agreement (I agree with the general gist of what you say,
    though there are some details which make your statement not true in all
    circumstances). But I wasn't worried about whether or not Java was
    interpreted; I was just saying if one of your requirements is "no
    interpreted languages", then there's probably a root reason behind that
    requirement, and that reason might equally apply to Java as well.

    One reason to avoid interpreters is that you don't want to install extra
    software on your production machine, which may be a valid reason to avoid
    Java, for example.

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Sep 6, 2005
    #11
  12. elektrophyte

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "Chris Smith" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Oliver Wong <> wrote:
    >> Assuming these non-engineers are employees of your shop, it doesn't
    >> seem
    >> unreasonable to spend an hour or two as a "training" session to explain
    >> how
    >> to fill out the bug report form on Bugzilla.

    >
    > One good reason might be that the bug reporting form in BugZilla assumes
    > a lot of procedural stuff that smaller vendors simply won't use. I have
    > often found myself in search of a smaller bug tracking system instead of
    > handling the beast that is BugZilla.


    Good point, and this is a reason I've been looking for alternatives to
    BugZilla as well. However, the two hacks I've encountered (or editing the
    source code to just comment out the displaying of such fields), or to inform
    the testers to just ignore those fields, have been "good enough" for most
    environments I've worked in.

    Still, if you find a smaller, simpler bug tracker, let us know.

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Sep 6, 2005
    #12
  13. elektrophyte

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "Roedy Green" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I wonder if it might pay developers to have a log feature to help in
    > tracking bugs. It would take a snapshot of the registry and data files
    > and bundle them up in a zip, then log keystrokes and mouse clicks and
    > moves (possibly abbreviating moves). Then the vendor would have an a
    > way of knowing exactly what the user did and where he started from.
    > Maybe there might be a way to get a screen snap even after the app has
    > crashed.


    While this may be a good idea for software "in the wild", if you have
    internal testers whom you are paying, it might be nice to actually have
    those testers go through the effort of actually trying to narrow down and
    determine what the *MINIMAL* sequence of steps are required to reproduce the
    bug.

    > The other tool I have not seen used is something like PCAnywhere where
    > the vendor and customer watch simultaneously as the customer causes
    > the problem.


    I believe this is (relatively) commonly done when supporting the
    computer in general, rather than a particular program. That is, something
    goes wrong with a user's computer, and rather than contacting a particular
    software vendor, the user just contacts a general help desk who will watch
    the user replicate the problem and then solve it, or inform the user of who
    she needs to contact to have the problem solved.

    > This brings up one of my pet peeves, error message filled with hex and
    > other gibberish you cannot copy/paste to give to the vendor. Copying
    > this to paper and transcribing is time consuming and introduces
    > errors.


    The advantage of a hexadecimal number is that it is typically some sort
    of identificiation number that can pinpoint the exact error that occured,
    and being a non-fluffy format, can probably be typed with less effort than
    an full English message. ;)

    Of course, it sucks if this hexademical number happens to be several
    hundred hex-digits long.

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Sep 6, 2005
    #13
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