DAL, BLL, does it make sense in a reporting only scenario ?

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by craigkenisston@hotmail.com, Jun 14, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I have to create an asp.net application that will take an already
    filled database and create about 30-40 different reports from it.
    I'm new to asp.net and I started following the examples and created BLL
    classes and a DAL bases on strong type datasets.
    Now, that I understand a bit what is it and what does it do, I wonder
    if this is really necesary.
    I could use SqlDataSource to connect directly to the database stored
    procedures I created for reports, right ?
    So, what do I lose if I skip the BLL and DAL layers in this context ?
     
    , Jun 14, 2006
    #1
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  2. Its simply a question of design. There is nothing wrong with connecting
    directly to the DB if its appropriate for your scenario, and if this is
    quite a self contained application then there may well be no benefit to
    layering your system.

    Regards

    John Timney (MVP)


    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have to create an asp.net application that will take an already
    > filled database and create about 30-40 different reports from it.
    > I'm new to asp.net and I started following the examples and created BLL
    > classes and a DAL bases on strong type datasets.
    > Now, that I understand a bit what is it and what does it do, I wonder
    > if this is really necesary.
    > I could use SqlDataSource to connect directly to the database stored
    > procedures I created for reports, right ?
    > So, what do I lose if I skip the BLL and DAL layers in this context ?
    >
     
    John Timney \(MVP\), Jun 14, 2006
    #2
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  3. tdavisjr Guest

    For reporting, I don't think it makes since. No need for 2 extra
    layers just to slow things up. Howver, I would opt for using Stored
    Procs rather than dynamic sql.


    wrote:
    > I have to create an asp.net application that will take an already
    > filled database and create about 30-40 different reports from it.
    > I'm new to asp.net and I started following the examples and created BLL
    > classes and a DAL bases on strong type datasets.
    > Now, that I understand a bit what is it and what does it do, I wonder
    > if this is really necesary.
    > I could use SqlDataSource to connect directly to the database stored
    > procedures I created for reports, right ?
    > So, what do I lose if I skip the BLL and DAL layers in this context ?
     
    tdavisjr, Jun 14, 2006
    #3
  4. Hi,
    That's overkill. Reporting has nothing to do with objects, besides you're
    probably returning datasets.

    The advice: try creating a single webservice called "Reports" or whatever
    you wish. Then put all your reports in there like

    GetWeeklySales
    GetMonthlySales
    GetCEOPerks
    ....

    Then let the report app call the webservice. That way all the code is in the
    webservice and can be called in future apps and even excel apps.

    App archietects are now thinking of simplicity! FINALLY!

    Thanks

    "" wrote:

    > I have to create an asp.net application that will take an already
    > filled database and create about 30-40 different reports from it.
    > I'm new to asp.net and I started following the examples and created BLL
    > classes and a DAL bases on strong type datasets.
    > Now, that I understand a bit what is it and what does it do, I wonder
    > if this is really necesary.
    > I could use SqlDataSource to connect directly to the database stored
    > procedures I created for reports, right ?
    > So, what do I lose if I skip the BLL and DAL layers in this context ?
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Q2hyaXM=?=, Jun 15, 2006
    #4
  5. sloan Guest

    I usually create strong typed DataSets for reports.

    But I still write a DataLayer. and a "dummy" biz layer that just passes up
    the DataSet.
    I guess its habit more than anything.

    However, if you ever need to "massage" the data... you should do this in the
    biz layer, so that would be a small reason to have the 3 layers no matter
    what.

    Keep in mind, if you wrote your original code (outside of reports) in good
    layers, then your datalayer is probably returning
    IDataReader's
    and
    DataSets anyways. Thus you should be able to reuse some stuff.

    see my 2.0 and 1.1 demo's at
    spaces.msn.com/sholliday (june 2006 entries)
    the 1.1 has strong datasets in it.




    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I have to create an asp.net application that will take an already
    > filled database and create about 30-40 different reports from it.
    > I'm new to asp.net and I started following the examples and created BLL
    > classes and a DAL bases on strong type datasets.
    > Now, that I understand a bit what is it and what does it do, I wonder
    > if this is really necesary.
    > I could use SqlDataSource to connect directly to the database stored
    > procedures I created for reports, right ?
    > So, what do I lose if I skip the BLL and DAL layers in this context ?
    >
     
    sloan, Jun 15, 2006
    #5
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